Company Sponsored Training. Time From Beginning Of Training To Solo

Topic 20962 | Page 1

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Terri D.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry, I am still picking your knowledge brains.

As you know I am scheduled to start community college training. But, I keep playing different scenarios in my mind. I want good knowledgeable training. Pay is secondary. I want to learn the industry.

Questions I have been asking myself;

How long is the average company sponsored training from beginning to solo? My schooling will be 8 weeks. That's just getting my CDL A ( already have NC permit and Medical card). No job at end. So ultimately will a company training put me in a better position as far as time training to solo?

After training, and experience I ultimately want to be home a couple days a week here in NC near 95. And frankly ultimately home more in time. I know it decreases pay but time with hubby is important. I obviously need income but need a balance as well. I am fine with that.

I want to a be a reliable and productive employee. I will be dedicated to my job.

If company sponsored is a better choice for my situation what companies would you suggest for my hiring area of I 95 corridor in NC close to Smithfield and Dunn.

I know a specific company is not the deciding factor. It is the effort and performance and proving yourself. But I know you all know the companies that would fit my needs and my area.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Different companies have different times. With CFI it was 4 weeks of CDL school to get my class A CDL. Then 4 days of orientation and about 3 weeks out with a trainer. You can look at the training diaries to see how long other companies are. With most Company-Sponsored Training Programs you will be getting paid while out with a trainer. I hope that helps.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

I did 4 weeks of CDL training, 3 days of orientation, 5 weeks out with a trainer, 3 days of re-orientation, and then hit the road as a solo driver. This was with Central Refrigerated back in 2011.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Terri breaks it down:

How long is the average company sponsored training from beginning to solo? My schooling will be 8 weeks. That's just getting my CDL A ( already have NC permit and Medical card). No job at end. So ultimately will a company training put me in a better position as far as time training to solo?

Yes, school can easily take 8 weeks, private or company school. On landing a job, you will be in road training for 4-6 weeks. During that time, do not plan on any home time, though you may get lucky. Depends on your trainer driver and company policies.

I went to Swift's Academy, starting first week of December. Officially went solo Feb. 2. That's about three months.

As for that all important home time, the rate is you earn one day home for each week on the road. So about once a month you can stay home four days. I talked to my DM and wife a two week out, one weekend home schedule.

Some companies do have schedules with more home time and less driving, with smaller paychecks, you know.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Re: expediency, company-sponsored training is going to see you solo approx. 4 wks. sooner than getting your CDL thru the community college + company orientation/training/evaluations. Look at Errol's example... early December- to - early February: two months (sorry Errol, not three). That's about right. Four weeks of CDL schooling, 3-4 wks of OTR training, plus several days of evaluations. Then solo. I went to a private school for my CDL... 4 1/2 wks of CDL school, followed by 4 wks of company training & evaluations, then solo. You're already into your community college for the same amount of time, and you haven't even begun your company's training program yet.

As far as looking for a company within the geographical parameters you mentioned, the company doesn't need to be based that close... most companies have drop lots or approved locations spread out across the country where you can leave your truck, or allow you to drive your truck home.

Hope this helps... ask more questions if you'd like clarification.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Sorry, I am still picking your knowledge brains.

Don't apologize for asking questions. Offering our knowledge brains is what we do and we enjoy it. That's like apologizing to Dairy Queen for ordering ice cream.

Terri, what I suggest you do is focus on finding a company that's going to offer you the home time you need. I would apply to any companies you can find who meet your criteria and see who offers you a position. If they happen to be a Company-Sponsored Training Program then go through their schooling. If they don't have their own training program then make sure they'll hire students from the school you plan on attending and go through a private school.

People tend to believe they'll have a lot more options for choosing a company than they actually will. There isn't going to be 30 companies who will offer you a position. It will more than likely only be a handful, especially once you narrow your choices to those who can get you home on weekends.

So make a list of the companies that meet your criteria, apply to them all, see who offers you a position, and then decide what training you'll need to land a job there.

You can apply to a bunch of company-sponsored programs at once here on our website with one quick form:

Apply For Company-Sponsored Training

You can also go through our Truck Driving Jobs and fill out applications individually for the companies you won't find on our quick form.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Terri D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you all!! Keep it coming.

People tend to believe they'll have a lot more options for choosing a company than they actually will. There isn't going to be 30 companies who will offer you a position. It will more than likely only be a handful

This is exactly what I started thinking about with the research here on this site. Which got me thinking, if I have OTR training for at least a 6 weeks if not more with a trainer until solo then maybe its may make more since to go company sponsored. In the diaries I don't see many taking 2 months to hit the road with a trainer.

I have enough (just) for private schooling which appears to be much cheaper than what companies quote as payback but that is not my focus. I want to learn the industry. I look at training the same as my training in my Paramedic career. Book learning and clinicals are a knowledge base but is in no way the reality of the actual job.

I would love to be OTR one day but I have to acknowledge I have someone at home that loves me and I will also respect that. However he has no income right now so I have to factor that in as well. He is currently starting a business but we all know that takes time.

I have been looking at many companies (honestly the more I look the more confused I get).

An established company (A must) Home time. (A must) Ride alongs (A must) Pets (A want)

I saw Roehl has: HOMEtime Plus™

7/7. Get up to 26 weeks off a year, driving 7 days out with 7 days at home.

7/4-7/3. Average 120 days off each year and get home every other week. Drive for 7 days with 4 days at home, followed by another 7 days with 3 days at home.

14/7. Get high miles and extended home time. Drive 14 days and enjoy 7 off.

But I need to reach out as I am not seeing hiring in my area.

Do other companies have such schedules?

Again you guys and gals are simply wonderful. Fabulous site.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I saw Roehl has: HOMEtime Plus™

But I need to reach out as I am not seeing hiring in my area.

Do other companies have such schedules?

Roehl has a very unique set of opportunities for home time and I don't know of any other companies that offer anything similar. Roehl does hire from North Carolina and they are one of the companies you can apply to through our application:

Apply For Company-Sponsored Training

I have been looking at many companies (honestly the more I look the more confused I get).

I know. That happens to everyone. Don't approach it from the standpoint of evaluating different companies and then choosing the one you want. Start with yourself - start with what you want and then find the companies that match your preferences for the home time you want and the type of freight you'd like to haul. Apply to all of those companies and then see who offers you an opportunity. Then you'll have a short list of companies that you can evaluate on a deeper level to find the one that suits you best.

In fact, North Carolina is one of the most popular hiring areas so you'll have more choices than many others will.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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