JB Hunt Intermodal Offered Me A Job

Topic 20963 | Page 1

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Cory D.'s Comment
member avatar

JB Hunt is offering me a job in the Intermodal division, I'll be in a tighter region area being mainly southeast compared to my current position at Schneider.

With JB Hunt I'll be making 7 cents more being 41cpm, 14$ detention pay and I forgot what the pay was for both normal stops and hazmat stop I believe it was 17$. They said I'll be bring home 1000-1300$ a week running 2000 miles plus I'll be home every week because it's a dedicated account. Recruiter says I'll be making 58k a year with a possibility of making 65K a year.

So my questions are.....

How is the Intermodal Division? What are your thoughts?

Since I'll be delivering to railroad areas how does it differs from going to a distribution center?

Is the pay really that good for hauling railroad parts?

Is hauling a container similar to a dryvan?

What training does the division offers that I should be aware of?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Good luck with all that! Personally, I'd like to never set steer tire in a rail yard ever again. The check-in procedure getting on-site is laborious, you've got to really inspect the container for damage(s), if you're bringing a container into a rail yard it cannot be damaged (punctured side from forklift)... I suppose if you're doing it all the time it all becomes second nature and goes much more smoothly, but it seems like a huge hassle to me; must be why they pay so well.

Containers are shorter than dry vans.

The intermodal training will consist mostly of container securement and rail yard procedures.

There should never be a lack of work... last week in a LA rail yard picking up an intermodal tanker, I saw many, many JB Hunt chassis and containers, and driving to AZ, then Los Angeles, then to AR, I saw a hundred trains carrying countless JB Hunt containers.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Cory D.'s Comment
member avatar

Good luck with all that! Personally, I'd like to never set steer tire in a rail yard ever again. The check-in procedure getting on-site is laborious, you've got to really inspect the container for damage(s), if you're bringing a container into a rail yard it cannot be damaged (punctured side from forklift)... I suppose if you're doing it all the time it all becomes second nature and goes much more smoothly, but it seems like a huge hassle to me; must be why they pay so well.

Containers are shorter than dry vans.

The intermodal training will consist mostly of container securement and rail yard procedures.

There should never be a lack of work... last week in a LA rail yard picking up an intermodal tanker, I saw many, many JB Hunt chassis and containers, and driving to AZ, then Los Angeles, then to AR, I saw a hundred trains carrying countless JB Hunt containers.

Interesting, so I assume they're a 48 then?

Been looking at some videos on intermodal trying to educate myself on the division and what the procedure is like, the guy at JB Hunt told me they have it where they can get in and get out compared to other intermodals companies.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

When my family moved to Ecuador, the two sizes of containers we priced were 20ft and 40ft; I do not know if they come longer than 40ft. The guy at JB Hunt should know; I'm fairly certain I've never seen one on a 53ft long trailer however, on the road or in a rail yard.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Cory, that's one situation where you're definitely going to want to talk with several JB Hunt drivers to find out the real scoop. Most OTR jobs are cookie cutter jobs so your experience won't vary much from company to company. But with Intermodal at JB, that's going to be different than most other jobs out there.

I strongly suspect JB is going to have some pretty nice advantages over most companies that go to railyards. That company is enormous and they're in deep with the railroads. Intermodal is their specialty. So there is going to be a lot of systems in place that help keep them moving a lot better than other carriers.

But that type of job isn't for everyone.

Definitely seek out several of their drivers and see what they have to say.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Cory, Brett gave you good advice in regards to understanding JBH intermodal operation.

On occasion I have pulled out of a rail yard. The Pre-trip inspection of the equipment you are under is critical because it is subjected to greater handling abuse and DOT many times will setup camp outside of the yard entrance.

JBH primarily runs domestic containers and trailers; 53' steel or composite containers (aka: cans) both dry and refrigerated and also 53' trailers. 48' cans were phased out beginning about 10 years ago. I haven't seen one in years.

The boxes Pete referred to are international containers (aka: ISO) and come in 20' and 40' sizes. Although there are also 45' ISO containers I believe they have been or are in the process of being completely phased out.

Per Brett's point, find an intermodal ramp and hang out near the gate. The JBH drivers will talk to you...at least for a couple of minutes.

Good luck.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Cory D.'s Comment
member avatar

I'll be sure to ask some questions from a JBH Intermodal driver and gather some info on the division.

Thanks everyone.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

Up here in the northeast the only JB Hunt containers I ever see are 53' ones. I do see a lot of 40's, but when it comes to JB Hunt it's 99% of the time 53'. But, being the opposite side of the country, that might be different.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I run Intermodal out of Portland Oregon, all the JB Hunt containers I see are 53'. I've pulled 20, 40, 45, and 53 foot cans.

I've noticed 53's are mostly run out of the railyards and the shorter are out of the ports.

53's are just like pulling dry van.

The first time I go to a new railyard or port that I've never been to its a bit confusing and easy to get lost. Especially some of the big Ports. But after one time through you pretty much know the routine for next time.

I like Intermodal so far, never been a shortage of work for the short time that I've been doing it.

Also first time backing a short trailer is crazy how fast it turns.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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