Linehaul Questions.

Topic 20964 | Page 1

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Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Planning to change over to linehaul sometime next year. Already working on getting my endorsements. I'll more than likely be living in Phoenix or Albuqerque when this time comes.

Why should I consider not taking or taking a union job?

Are all of these companies line runs based on seniority or do they hire as needed? Don't know if it would be worth the risk if I get hired on somewhere and end up being starved out waiting for bids.

Lastly what's it like pulling doubles?

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm sure 6 string will reply at some point. I started around the same time you did, maybe a month or so earlier. I got 1.5 years in now and was also looking into linehaul. The biggest hindrance for me was and still is location. I'm just a little too far out from these places to really try and work for one. Anyway, seniority is key at these places. They tend to hire seasonally but usually from within. Linehaul is where the money is. Flatbed has been good for the wallet but I'd like to go that direction eventually.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Cold War Surplus's Comment
member avatar

You're probably going to take the company that will hire you. Every region is different in linehaul but these jobs pay well and LTL carriers usually don't struggle as much as OTR carriers to find drivers. I've heard stories of trainees being offered linehaul positions right out of school in the Northeast. In the Northwest there's a regional LTL carrier (Penninsula Truck Lines) that wants five years of verified OTR experience before they'll consider you. Consider my remarks as applicable to the Northwest market, but other markets aren't that different.

The big advantage with the union carriers is the insurance. Usually, it's thrown in at no charge to you beyond paying union dues. Unions were exempted from Obamacare so you can still get a, "Cadillac plan". The big hitch is the wages. Yellow/YRC/New Penn/Holland/Reddaway starting pay is on the low end of the scale (51.56 cpm/$20.83/hr. to start) and then there's the 15% giveback - they deduct 15% of your earnings back! UPS wages are o.k., but they tend to starve out new drivers giving them 1 or 2 runs a week. Compare Yellow's starting wage with SAIA (64 cpm w/2 years exp.), Old Dominion (68 cpm), Estes (68 cpm).

As an entry-level linehaul driver you'll be working the extra board (sometimes called the system). A typical linehaul terminal will have 12-15 drivers on bid runs and those drivers will have 3 or 4 weeks of vacation time each so 36-60 weeks where they will need someone to fill in for them. Bid driver sick days and extra freight during the busy season will fill out your runs. Seniority comes into play when bidding on a regular run. After you've worked the extra board for a year or two you will probably have enough seniority to get a bid run. Seniority also comes into play for weekend work.

Traditionally, P&D drivers get promoted into linehaul but their wives usually veto this in favor of having them home at night. The big problem you're going to face is external competition. If a terminal has one opening and another driver with a clean record and 5 years of experience applies you won't get called back. If that other driver doesn't apply you will get the job.

Pulling doubles and triples isn't the hard part - wrestling with the dollies to hitch your set is the hard part. It can be extra difficult if you're doing it in an uneven, gravel lot. The driving part isn't that much different than pulling a single 53' dry van. Doubles and triples have fewer accidents than singles. Parking can be a challenge since 84' of trailers takes up a lot more room than a single and backing up isn't an option.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I just finished my first week solo on Linehaul with Old Dominion last week, they hired me as a extra board driver making .55 a mile. Ill be filling in as needed on drivers dedicated runs as well as running the shorter runs. I can't speak as too the benefits vs draw backs of a union company as OD is non union. At least with my terminal they have been looking for people to run extra on the weekends all 5 weeks I have worked for them.

So far I haven't noticed too much difference on the road compared to a 53' although with that said it was interesting on Saturday running empties in heavy rain. So far the biggest challenge and time killer for me has been getting everything lined up to hook up the set and moving the dolly around,

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

You're probably going to take the company that will hire you. Every region is different in linehaul but these jobs pay well and LTL carriers usually don't struggle as much as OTR carriers to find drivers. I've heard stories of trainees being offered linehaul positions right out of school in the Northeast. In the Northwest there's a regional LTL carrier (Penninsula Truck Lines) that wants five years of verified OTR experience before they'll consider you. Consider my remarks as applicable to the Northwest market, but other markets aren't that different.

The big advantage with the union carriers is the insurance. Usually, it's thrown in at no charge to you beyond paying union dues. Unions were exempted from Obamacare so you can still get a, "Cadillac plan". The big hitch is the wages. Yellow/YRC/New Penn/Holland/Reddaway starting pay is on the low end of the scale (51.56 cpm/$20.83/hr. to start) and then there's the 15% giveback - they deduct 15% of your earnings back! UPS wages are o.k., but they tend to starve out new drivers giving them 1 or 2 runs a week. Compare Yellow's starting wage with SAIA (64 cpm w/2 years exp.), Old Dominion (68 cpm), Estes (68 cpm).

As an entry-level linehaul driver you'll be working the extra board (sometimes called the system). A typical linehaul terminal will have 12-15 drivers on bid runs and those drivers will have 3 or 4 weeks of vacation time each so 36-60 weeks where they will need someone to fill in for them. Bid driver sick days and extra freight during the busy season will fill out your runs. Seniority comes into play when bidding on a regular run. After you've worked the extra board for a year or two you will probably have enough seniority to get a bid run. Seniority also comes into play for weekend work.

Traditionally, P&D drivers get promoted into linehaul but their wives usually veto this in favor of having them home at night. The big problem you're going to face is external competition. If a terminal has one opening and another driver with a clean record and 5 years of experience applies you won't get called back. If that other driver doesn't apply you will get the job.

Pulling doubles and triples isn't the hard part - wrestling with the dollies to hitch your set is the hard part. It can be extra difficult if you're doing it in an uneven, gravel lot. The driving part isn't that much different than pulling a single 53' dry van. Doubles and triples have fewer accidents than singles. Parking can be a challenge since 84' of trailers takes up a lot more room than a single and backing up isn't an option.

Thanks for the input. Pretty much covered what I was wondering about.

I just finished my first week solo on Linehaul with Old Dominion last week, they hired me as a extra board driver making .55 a mile. Ill be filling in as needed on drivers dedicated runs as well as running the shorter runs. I can't speak as too the benefits vs draw backs of a union company as OD is non union. At least with my terminal they have been looking for people to run extra on the weekends all 5 weeks I have worked for them.

So far I haven't noticed too much difference on the road compared to a 53' although with that said it was interesting on Saturday running empties in heavy rain. So far the biggest challenge and time killer for me has been getting everything lined up to hook up the set and moving the dolly around,

Awesome to hear. I am not scared of nights or weekends so that should really help me in the beginning from what it sounds like!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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