How Do I Get Into Oilfield Work?

Topic 20983 | Page 1

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James O.'s Comment
member avatar

I'll be done with cdl school in a couple weeks. We always have recruiters come in and give presentations, but they're mostly mega carriers. I keep hearing about big money in the oil fields. I don't care if I have to work for 35k/year for a couple years before I make good money. I don't care if I'll live in the middle of nowhere. I just want to put myself in a position (get my foot in the door) where I can be making big money down the road. Any suggestions on companies or ways to get working in this? Thanks in advance.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Just saying oilfield is pretty vague because there's all kinds of hauling involved with energy companies. What do you want to haul? Where do you live? What kind of environment do you want to work in would be a few questions. The other suggestion would be to hold off for a bit longer. It's slowly coming back but the guys making money are the ones who stuck it out during the slow times and the companies know them and their reputation. The new guys are still struggling at the moment.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Jim hears:

I keep hearing about big money in the oil fields.

James, that may be true. But "big money" isn't free. You will work, hard, for it. Also, oil is a business that has its real ups and downs. "Everybody" gets a job, working 70 hours a week. Then the price of oil drops or something, and suddenly there's lots of unemployed people in Wyoming and Texas. Is that what you're looking for?

ACO476's Comment
member avatar

I'll be done with cdl school in a couple weeks. We always have recruiters come in and give presentations, but they're mostly mega carriers. I keep hearing about big money in the oil fields. I don't care if I have to work for 35k/year for a couple years before I make good money. I don't care if I'll live in the middle of nowhere. I just want to put myself in a position (get my foot in the door) where I can be making big money down the road. Any suggestions on companies or ways to get working in this? Thanks in advance.

If you live in Texas, try Schlumberger, Par 5 Energy Services, 9 Energy Services, or Basic Energy Services. There are numerous other water haulers for the oil fields too. Where do you live exactly?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
James O.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'll be done with cdl school in a couple weeks. We always have recruiters come in and give presentations, but they're mostly mega carriers. I keep hearing about big money in the oil fields. I don't care if I have to work for 35k/year for a couple years before I make good money. I don't care if I'll live in the middle of nowhere. I just want to put myself in a position (get my foot in the door) where I can be making big money down the road. Any suggestions on companies or ways to get working in this? Thanks in advance.

double-quotes-end.png

If you live in Texas, try Schlumberger, Par 5 Energy Services, 9 Energy Services, or Basic Energy Services. There are numerous other water haulers for the oil fields too. Where do you live exactly?

I live in Portland Oregon. But but that doesn't matter because I can move wherever I need to.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

James, I'm curious - what kind of annual income are you expecting from your trucking career. This is a great career for those who put in the commitment to excel at it. I've never heard a success story from anyone who approached it as a quick way to make big money.

If you'd be willing to throw a number out there of what kind of annual salary you think you should be worth, then I'm sure we could help point you in the right direction, and help you understand how to achieve your goals.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
ACO476's Comment
member avatar

James,

I can’t help you out with Portland, but you can check those Texas companies I listed. You can add Halliburton to that list too.

Good luck to you in your endeavors.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

There's a long list of companies I could recommend as well as a list to avoid but you do need to get some experience under your belt first. Driving in the oil fields isn't the easiest of work and it's very very easy to put yourself in a nasty position. Plus, you need to get some knowledge regarding simple repairs or you'll spend too much time sitting, many times in the middle of nowhere. That being said, yes you can make very good money once things really start rolling, easily more than you can make in most other aspects of trucking but you spend a lot of time sitting.

James O.'s Comment
member avatar

James, I'm curious - what kind of annual income are you expecting from your trucking career. This is a great career for those who put in the commitment to excel at it. I've never heard a success story from anyone who approached it as a quick way to make big money.

If you'd be willing to throw a number out there of what kind of annual salary you think you should be worth, then I'm sure we could help point you in the right direction, and help you understand how to achieve your goals.

I only need to make 40,000 a year. I would be willing to do that for 2 years before I could get a better job. I haven't even finished school yet, so I can't say what I'm worth.. but I'm hoping 40k is average for a first year driver.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

You can easily achieve $40k your first year with some effort and discipline no matter what company you work for. So, besides oil field work what are you wanting to do? Flatbed, dry van , reefer , tanker, dry bulk tanker? Answer that and you know at least where to start looking.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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