Trucking Is About Standing Your Ground

Topic 20985 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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“kill them with kindness.”

Oh man, that was my Grandma's favorite saying and she was sure right about that. It takes a lot of discipline sometimes to be kind in tough circumstances, but it almost always pays off in a big way.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
rookie the cookie's Comment
member avatar

I understand you man and i know it takes a lot of patience and self control to be a trucker and you guys know a lot better then me so I'm gonna start doing what you guys told me nd m sure it'll work because it worked for you guys for a long time.but i hope shippers and receivers get more responsible and start doing better time management .

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Kay, the longer you do this, the more you will figure out which places are slow. If you go to any type of grocery DC, plan on at least 4 hours of your life being used up. Also you will gain familiarity with certain DCs. You will come to know roughly how long each specific place takes. If you are going to someplace unfamiliar ask your dispatch what the average wait time is there. Trucking companies do keep track of that sort of thing. They can tell you the average load/unload time was x hours. At least gives a middle of the road idea. Also building a rapport with customers is a good thing. If you are always nice and kind, workers will begin to remember you. Mainly because you are the odd one out that was nice. Before you know it, they will do the little xtra to get you done quicker.

Prime example: There is a scrap place in Nashville, TN. I frequently go to it, especially on my way going out for my time on the road or coming in for hometime. I have built a rapport with the dock workers. Great guys btw. At first I would take 1.5 to 3 hours to get loaded. Now when I show up, the guy working the dock will grab a second person and run 2 forklifts in and out of my trailer. I am literally loaded, scaled, paperwork in hand and on my way within 30 mins of getting in the dock.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I understand you man and i know it takes a lot of patience and self control to be a trucker and you guys know a lot better then me so I'm gonna start doing what you guys told me nd m sure it'll work because it worked for you guys for a long time.but i hope shippers and receivers get more responsible and start doing better time management .

Dude I'm impressed. I almost never see someone respond like this on this site. Thanks for taking these drivers' advice. I wish you the best.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

I take it you're a refer driver. I pull dry van and most of my DC runs are drop hook. When I have a live load/unload I get there early, check in and wait for a door. If I am there two hours or more, I get paid detention. I rarely run out of time at a shipper/receiver and always try to plan where I'll sleep. I treat everyone I deal with with the utmost respect. Please amd thank you very much are always used. I am representing my company and my job depends on their business. I don't have problems with the people I deal with. A big part of this job is clock management. This is learned over time. Even the best laid plans can blow up in your face. Communicate with your dispatch any delays as soon as you know. Let your company handle your problems. I know refer takes longer at shippers/receivers. I know at least one refer driver who from time to time takes an 8 hour SB break while in the door. Learning the 8/2 split can ne a lifesaver sometimes. I hope this helps.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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