Load Locks

Topic 21003 | Page 1

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Serah D.'s Comment
member avatar

If you have none, is it a DOT violation?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

I don't think it is a DOT violation.

Some shippers will require them, before they let you drive away with their product. Some companies have a policy of requiring them, in addition to the door seal. Plus, it is just a really good idea, protecting you from any liability should your trailer get broken into, and you didn't have a load lock to prevent it from happening.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Big T's Comment
member avatar

Load locks are bars placed in the trailer to help keep the cargo "locked" in place. They are not actual locks.

You are responsible to make sure the load is secure if possible. That may mean using load locks, straps, airbags, etc. Some loads dont require anything at all.

It is a good idea to make sure you carry them because some customers will require them. I also carry a couple straps even though I have yet to see one of our reefer trailers that can use them. If it exists I'll find it when I don't have them lol.

I don't think it is a DOT violation.

Some shippers will require them, before they let you drive away with their product. Some companies have a policy of requiring them, in addition to the door seal. Plus, it is just a really good idea, protecting you from any liability should your trailer get broken into, and you didn't have a load lock to prevent it from happening.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Added info: most tractors have load lock racks installed. If not, check with your shop.

Although it's entirely possible to buy load locks, don't. Ask at the shop (maybe while you're getting the racks put on), there might be a stack leaning in a corner somewhere. 2-3 are sufficient. Get them this way because every once in a while you won't have a chance to get into the back and retrieve them.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Added info: most tractors have load lock racks installed. If not, check with your shop.

Although it's entirely possible to buy load locks, don't. Ask at the shop (maybe while you're getting the racks put on), there might be a stack leaning in a corner somewhere. 2-3 are sufficient. Get them this way because every once in a while you won't have a chance to get into the back and retrieve them.

Errol's 100% right here. Next time your truck is in the shop, check with them and see if they have some spare load locks you can put on the rack on your truck. The rack if I am correct should hold 4 full size load locks.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

CFI only uses straps. You start with 4 and evatually have more than you'll ever need. Some of our bigger accounts require us to leave 2 straps. We will get 2 with the load.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

CFI only uses straps. You start with 4 and evatually have more than you'll ever need. Some of our bigger accounts require us to leave 2 straps. We will get 2 with the load.

Yup, straps are way easier to use, cleaner, and easier to stow. I accumulated 3-4 just from finding them in empty trailers. (A receiver will nearly always leave any packing equipment in the trailer.)

Problem is, older trailers don't have the hooking hardware on the inside walls.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Load locks are bars placed in the trailer to help keep the cargo "locked" in place. They are not actual locks.

You are responsible to make sure the load is secure if possible. That may mean using load locks, straps, airbags, etc. Some loads dont require anything at all.

It is a good idea to make sure you carry them because some customers will require them. I also carry a couple straps even though I have yet to see one of our reefer trailers that can use them. If it exists I'll find it when I don't have them lol.

double-quotes-start.png

I don't think it is a DOT violation.

Some shippers will require them, before they let you drive away with their product. Some companies have a policy of requiring them, in addition to the door seal. Plus, it is just a really good idea, protecting you from any liability should your trailer get broken into, and you didn't have a load lock to prevent it from happening.

double-quotes-end.png

Oops, I totally read that wrong! Thanks for the clarification 😊

We don't carry any, and I have yet to come across one in any of the trailers we pull.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Serah D.'s Comment
member avatar

So you all agree its not a DOT violation not to havd them? How would you know wben to use them if customer has already locked doors and put a seal? Most of my loads are drop/hook.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Danialsahn wrote:

We don't carry any, and I have yet to come across one in any of the trailers we pull.

Daniel for any Walmart Dedicated reefer load destined for stores or Sams, must me strapped up before departing the first stop. Otherwise if there is damage, driver is held responsible. All of the Walmart reefers have logistics tracks; some have two, the newer ones 305000-310999 series have 4.

Although I am not 100% certain Johnstown D. C. has that policy, but our D.C. sure does. I carry four straps.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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