Load Locks

Topic 21003 | Page 3

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G-Town's Comment
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Danielsahn wrote:

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It makes me wonder, though, if we should be using the straps, as pallets come off after each stop.

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Yes. No wondering, thats what I said; "strap-up before departing the first stop." We are required to do just that. Likely the same is required for the Johnstown DC.

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I will ask my mentor why he doesn't strap up, when he returns from his 34. I asked another driver, and was told to not worry about it. Now, I am worrying about it.

Nothing like a little contradicting information.

What matters more is what the DM(s) says. If you were to ask many of the drivers I work with, they'd echo the same message you received from the other driver you spoke to. It's a Walmart policy and written into the SLA's (service level agreements) of the Swift contract; if anything "dumps" after the first stop, Swift is responsible (especially if JIT perishable cargo, which is what we are hauling). For us drivers on the Walmart Account it's a delivery failure, negatively affecting bonus pay and Swift's performance record evaluation.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

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Danielsahn wrote:

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double-quotes-start.png

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It makes me wonder, though, if we should be using the straps, as pallets come off after each stop.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Yes. No wondering, thats what I said; "strap-up before departing the first stop." We are required to do just that. Likely the same is required for the Johnstown DC.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I will ask my mentor why he doesn't strap up, when he returns from his 34. I asked another driver, and was told to not worry about it. Now, I am worrying about it.

double-quotes-end.png

Nothing like a little contradicting information.

What matters more is what the DM(s) says. If you were to ask many of the drivers I work with, they'd echo the same message you received from the other driver you spoke to. It's a Walmart policy and written into the SLA's (service level agreements) of the Swift contract; if anything "dumps" after the first stop, Swift is responsible (especially if JIT perishable cargo, which is what we are hauling). For us drivers on the Walmart Account it's a delivery failure, negatively affecting bonus pay and Swift's performance record evaluation.

One of the reasons I love this site. I spoke with my DM. It is a requirement. However, he leaves it up to each driver's discretion, on whether to use them. I will have my mentor show me the ropes. An extra 5 minutes to secure the pallets can only save my arse. Thanks Gtown.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Dainelsahn wrote:

One of the reasons I love this site. I spoke with my DM. It is a requirement. However, he leaves it up to each driver's discretion, on whether to use them. I will have my mentor show me the ropes. An extra 5 minutes to secure the pallets can only save my arse. Thanks Gtown.

You're welcome and thanks for the plug. I'm sure Brett appreciates hearing that sort of feedback...

Yes. Glad you checked, better safe than sorry. And five minutes is an accurate time estimate required to do this. It also bodes well for you that you'd have the foresight and initiative to ask such a question. My rule of thumb on this topic: if the pallet is above 4.0' high, I strap it in. That said, Meat and Produce (M&P) pallets tend to be lower in height, less dense and more stable. FDD (Freezer, Deli, Dairy) tend to be higher stacked pallets (8'), more dense (heavier), and far less stable.

One additional question and point for you on WM load securement; has your Mentor demonstrated how-to secure the bulkheads to the logistics tracks? Case in point, many times you'll have two-three pallets remaining in zone-3; same number in the center section, zone 2 after your first or second stop. This creates a large space between the bulkhead isolating zone 2 from zone 3, creating zero stability behind/supporting the back of the remaining pallets in zone 3, allowing the bulkhead halves to pivot freely like a huge pet door. There are adjustable logistics straps built into the bulkheads used for securing to the interior sides of the reefer and center 3 or 4 velcro straps for fastening the center seem of the bulkhead sides. Securing the bulkhead in combination with the straps, basically surrounds the pallets with a securement point. There will be little chance to fall in any direction.

The above approach has never (knock on wood) failed me.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Dainelsahn wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

One of the reasons I love this site. I spoke with my DM. It is a requirement. However, he leaves it up to each driver's discretion, on whether to use them. I will have my mentor show me the ropes. An extra 5 minutes to secure the pallets can only save my arse. Thanks Gtown.

double-quotes-end.png

You're welcome and thanks for the plug. I'm sure Brett appreciates hearing that sort of feedback...

Yes. Glad you checked, better safe than sorry. And five minutes is an accurate time estimate required to do this. It also bodes well for you that you'd have the foresight and initiative to ask such a question. My rule of thumb on this topic: if the pallet is above 4.0' high, I strap it in. That said, Meat and Produce (M&P) pallets tend to be lower in height, less dense and more stable. FDD (Freezer, Deli, Dairy) tend to be higher stacked pallets (8'), more dense (heavier), and far less stable.

One additional question and point for you on WM load securement; has your Mentor demonstrated how-to secure the bulkheads to the logistics tracks? Case in point, many times you'll have two-three pallets remaining in zone-3; same number in the center section, zone 2 after your first or second stop. This creates a large space between the bulkhead isolating zone 2 from zone 3, creating zero stability behind/supporting the back of the remaining pallets in zone 3, allowing the bulkhead halves to pivot freely like a huge pet door. There are adjustable logistics straps built into the bulkheads used for securing to the interior sides of the reefer and center 3 or 4 velcro straps for fastening the center seem of the bulkhead sides. Securing the bulkhead in combination with the straps, basically surrounds the pallets with a securement point. There will be little chance to fall in any direction.

The above approach has never (knock on wood) failed me.

Yes he has. And we put the bulkhead doors right up to the next zone pallets if we can. And all the way forward, for the pallets in those zones to be placed as far forward as possible.

I have already lost skin to locking those doors in place, lol. Also, I think they discriminate against short people. I can barely reach the hook clips sometimes when lifting the doors.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

ShortRound's Comment
member avatar

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Dainelsahn wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

One of the reasons I love this site. I spoke with my DM. It is a requirement. However, he leaves it up to each driver's discretion, on whether to use them. I will have my mentor show me the ropes. An extra 5 minutes to secure the pallets can only save my arse. Thanks Gtown.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You're welcome and thanks for the plug. I'm sure Brett appreciates hearing that sort of feedback...

Yes. Glad you checked, better safe than sorry. And five minutes is an accurate time estimate required to do this. It also bodes well for you that you'd have the foresight and initiative to ask such a question. My rule of thumb on this topic: if the pallet is above 4.0' high, I strap it in. That said, Meat and Produce (M&P) pallets tend to be lower in height, less dense and more stable. FDD (Freezer, Deli, Dairy) tend to be higher stacked pallets (8'), more dense (heavier), and far less stable.

One additional question and point for you on WM load securement; has your Mentor demonstrated how-to secure the bulkheads to the logistics tracks? Case in point, many times you'll have two-three pallets remaining in zone-3; same number in the center section, zone 2 after your first or second stop. This creates a large space between the bulkhead isolating zone 2 from zone 3, creating zero stability behind/supporting the back of the remaining pallets in zone 3, allowing the bulkhead halves to pivot freely like a huge pet door. There are adjustable logistics straps built into the bulkheads used for securing to the interior sides of the reefer and center 3 or 4 velcro straps for fastening the center seem of the bulkhead sides. Securing the bulkhead in combination with the straps, basically surrounds the pallets with a securement point. There will be little chance to fall in any direction.

The above approach has never (knock on wood) failed me.

double-quotes-end.png

Yes he has. And we put the bulkhead doors right up to the next zone pallets if we can. And all the way forward, for the pallets in those zones to be placed as far forward as possible.

I have already lost skin to locking those doors in place, lol. Also, I think they discriminate against short people. I can barely reach the hook clips sometimes when lifting the doors.

I found a "5th wheel puller" works perfect for reaching those hooks for the bulkheads. I'm 5'2" and struggled with them for a couple months before I had the epiphany of using my "5th wheel puller".

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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