Companies Who Use Automatic Trucks Based In Los Angeles, CA

Topic 21010 | Page 1

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Reptar310's Comment
member avatar

I know there are several threads about companies who use automatics. I am specifically looking for companies with yards in Los Angeles, who do local work here. Smaller companies like the ones who run out of the port/rail yards, LTL , local pickup and deliveries, etc. It seems that all the companies in the threads I've seen are talking about megas that are based on the East Coast and Midwest. Anyone know of any who are based in Los Angeles, CA?

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Richard, welcome to the forum!

Are you a new driver? We usually recommend the larger companies as the best places to start your career. I don't like the idea of starting out as a local driver, but we don't know you yet and it's hard to advise you based on what you've presented us with.

As a general rule the large carriers are some of the finest trucking companies to work for. They have great well maintained equipment, consistent freight, and financial stability. If you are wanting to drive an automatic truck, the large carriers are once again your more logical choice - many of them are transitioning their fleets to auto shift trucks now.

Also many of the large carriers do rail and port work, but they are going to want you to gain some experience with them as an Over the Road driver first before they let you in on that type of job. There is a reason for that. Local work demands a skill set that is best developed by gaining some real world experience as an OTR driver first.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

John M.'s Comment
member avatar

Werner has a terminal in Fontana we might have what your looking for

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Reptar310's Comment
member avatar

Hello Richard, welcome to the forum!

Are you a new driver? We usually recommend the larger companies as the best places to start your career. I don't like the idea of starting out as a local driver, but we don't know you yet and it's hard to advise you based on what you've presented us with.

As a general rule the large carriers are some of the finest trucking companies to work for. They have great well maintained equipment, consistent freight, and financial stability. If you are wanting to drive an automatic truck, the large carriers are once again your more logical choice - many of them are transitioning their fleets to auto shift trucks now.

Also many of the large carriers do rail and port work, but they are going to want you to gain some experience with them as an Over the Road driver first before they let you in on that type of job. There is a reason for that. Local work demands a skill set that is best developed by gaining some real world experience as an OTR driver first.

I actually do have 1.5 years experience otr, and another 9 months as a yard jockey. I just prefer driving an automatic in LA traffic. I don't particularly want to work for a mega again, but would be willing to if it were local work in an automatic truck.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

JB Hunt probably runs the rail yards out that way.

You can also check out our Truck Driving Jobs for more ideas.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I know there are several threads about companies who use automatics. I am specifically looking for companies with yards in Los Angeles, who do local work here. Smaller companies like the ones who run out of the port/rail yards, LTL , local pickup and deliveries, etc. It seems that all the companies in the threads I've seen are talking about megas that are based on the East Coast and Midwest. Anyone know of any who are based in Los Angeles, CA?

Where they're based is of little consequence.

All of the "bigs" run the rail yards; JB Hunt being #1 followed by Schneider, UPS, HUB Group, Swift, and Prime. Try not to sign-on with a small Mom & Pop drayage operator. You'll likely be driving junk, possibly as a 1099 sub-contractor.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Reptar310's Comment
member avatar

JB Hunt probably runs the rail yards out that way.

You can also check out our Truck Driving Jobs for more ideas.

I have checked them out. They are going all auto, but they're just starting the process according to their recruiters. I may just settle for them if I don't find anything else soon.

Schneider is an option but they'll only hire people that live within 20 miles of their yard, which I don't. And I don't want to ever go back to Swift.

Really I was hoping somebody on here would know of a midsize company that run autos here in LA. I know Sysco does, but they're way East of Los Angeles in Walnut. I have found 2 small port intermodal companies who run all auto's, but they unfortunately pay 1099.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

What does the size of the company have to do with anything? You're one guy driving one truck. Who cares how many trucks a company has?

Rob's Comment
member avatar

I see you mention Sysco in your comment. Are you aware of the manual labor involved? It is definitely a job that requires you to do hard, physical labor your entire shift which could last 14 hours. I worked in Sysco's warehouse for 2 years and in 2 different DC's (Tampa/st pete, and Des Moines) and when I left ,4 months ago they were still primarily manual transmissions. They were buying automatics to replace the manuals that they were getting rid of but that's a process that's going to take a while and many senior guys would have option to take one before you, being the new guy. I would definitely inquire about that prior to getting hired if its important to you. Sysco also has overnight shuttle runs that they do however both places I worked guys with seniority had those.

I am currently finishing my 10th week of 12 week training period with PFG, fresh out of CDL school, doing same thing Sysco does. I had posted what one of my weeks were in the "training diaries" section. One big difference in my market with PFG and Sysco is at PFG we run 28 foot PUP trailers with 500 to 600 cases, sysco runs 48's with 800 -1200 cases but Sysco also has more dock stops (bump the dock and use a pallet jack rather than 2 wheeling it down the ramp). If you're serious about food service ill try to answer questions the best i can in my limited experience, or I will ask one of my trainers.

Lastly, know that injuries seem to be alot more common in foodservice. Doesn't matter what company the drivers drive for. I've talked to drivers from several companies around town and they all warn me it isn't a question of IF you'll have an injury, such as falling out of the trailer, its a question of WHEN will it happen. Once fulfill my one year contract for my CDL training I will probably look at other avenues.

double-quotes-start.png

JB Hunt probably runs the rail yards out that way.

You can also check out our Truck Driving Jobs for more ideas.

double-quotes-end.png

I have checked them out. They are going all auto, but they're just starting the process according to their recruiters. I may just settle for them if I don't find anything else soon.

Schneider is an option but they'll only hire people that live within 20 miles of their yard, which I don't. And I don't want to ever go back to Swift.

Really I was hoping somebody on here would know of a midsize company that run autos here in LA. I know Sysco does, but they're way East of Los Angeles in Walnut. I have found 2 small port intermodal companies who run all auto's, but they unfortunately pay 1099.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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