Not Looking Forward To Training.

Topic 21020 | Page 1

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NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Need suggestions on which companies offer the most painless on road training for rookies. I understand that I need to learn as much as possible. But I'm not looking forward to living with a stranger for a month. Not the end of the world. I've been in jail before. But not desirable. Which companies have the shortest (but still informative) training programs. Oh btw I'll be getting my CDL through a private school. TDI. Anybody been there??

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I graduated from TDI, Milton, FL about three years ago. I went with Schneider, partially because orientation is only 17 days. I don’t know how your jail time (i.e. conviction) will impact getting hired by Schneider though.

Good luck!

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

I graduated from TDI, Milton, FL about three years ago. I went with Schneider, partially because orientation is only 17 days. I don’t know how your jail time (i.e. conviction) will impact getting hired by Schneider though.

Good luck!

Schneider definitely has a short but sweet training program. 3 weeks total, no team training, in a hotel with another trainee when not on the road.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

How was TDI?? Lots of recruiters there daily like they say? High success rate? I don't have any felony conviction so I should be ok to go to any company. Are you OTR , regional what? Like it?

I graduated from TDI, Milton, FL about three years ago. I went with Schneider, partially because orientation is only 17 days. I don’t know how your jail time (i.e. conviction) will impact getting hired by Schneider though.

Good luck!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I understand that I need to learn as much as possible. But I'm not looking forward to living with a stranger for a month. Not the end of the world.

Look, I understand you've probably read some horror stories, because there's plenty of them. I had a terrible trainer myself. Today that experience is a distant memory. Training, while important, is a drop in the bucket of your new career. Today I'm a very successful driver who really never gives a thought to the difficult time I had with my trainer.

Don't let yourself get too anxious about it. Go with the flow and you might just be real fortunate and have a good experience with your trainer.

There are several things about training for this job that make it tough...

- The long hours are surprisingly hard on folks who are accustomed to working eight hour days and then relaxing at home. That's a rude awakening that makes people doubt their decision to do this. They tend to blame their trainer for pushing them too hard. The fact is, that's how trucking works, and the trainer is accustomed to that.

- The complete seperation from friends and family also hits folks hard when they first go out with their trainer. I can't tell you how many grown men have admitted in here that they broke down crying during their training time. You will experience a "roller coaster" effect on your emotions. The long hours, the fatigue, and the separation from everyone and everything you are comfortable with has this non relenting pressure on your emotions that makes people feel they have made a foolish decision and all they want is "out of here." Once again people tend to push these feelings off as displeasure with their trainer.

- The frustrations of feeling that you are not making sufficient progress with things like backing that big ole 53 foot trailer in between two other semis at the truck stop when you are "dog tired" from the 14 hour day you just pushed through. Then realizing, when all you want to do is lay your head on your pillow, that your trainer wants you to plan out a 2,300 mile imaginary trip for him so that he can make sure you are prepared for all this stuff. Once again, these situations make you just want to scratch their eye balls out.

Training is hard, even with a good trainer. For most people it will be the longest four weeks of their life. But, it's really short, especially if you can keep the big picture in focus. I've been out here almost five years now, and loving every minute of this "grand adventure." I did not enjoy my training, but I never think of it at all. It's only a memory at this point.

Keep your eyes on the prize and get past those frustrations that every trainee goes through. Trust me, when you get assigned your truck and hook to that first load, you'll be thinking, "OMG, what do I do now? Oh I just wish I could ask my trainer to show me what to do now."

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Need suggestions on which companies offer the most painless on road training for rookies. I understand that I need to learn as much as possible. But I'm not looking forward to living with a stranger for a month. Not the end of the world. I've been in jail before. But not desirable. Which companies have the shortest (but still informative) training programs. Oh btw I'll be getting my CDL through a private school. TDI. Anybody been there??

What, exactly, are you looking for, NeeklODN? "Painless road training"? "Shortest training programs"?

Look through the CDL Training Diaries to see what trucking life is like. This isn't a cruise in the Caribbean. Trucking is a 24/7 type job, often outside in any weather.

As for "living with a stranger", remember first, these people are chosen by the company to help rookies get their feet wet. So these guys aren't just of the street. As your mentor's help is the best way to firm up your trucking game. Learn from them. That's what you're literally paid to do.

No shortcuts. If you're not in a training situation for 4-6 weeks, you won't learn anything.

NeeklODN, fear not, this is the best place to get your questions answered. Check out the resources on the three-bar menu (top left).

Here's some reading material for you:

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Painless? No offense, but I chuckled when I saw your subject line. Quite frankly many times the pain you speak of is self-inflicted by the student. Training is a two-way street, requiring the student to effectively communicate with their trainer, including practicing good listening skills. I constantly suggest to "Own Your Training", making the most of it. Because once solo, when it's all said and done, you'll quickly realize just how short it really was.

No matter what, the time you spend in training can only scratch the surface of what is truly required to be successful at this job. I strongly suggest reading the links that Errol replied with and heeding his advice and that of Old School. We have all been through this. Although many of us had really good training experiences, some unfortunately haven't. Either way it's arguably the most important step required for building your skills and knowledge foundation. I suggest approaching it with conviction, an open mind, and a very positive attitude.

The below link might help you to better understand the dynamics of training...good luck.

On the Road With a Trainer

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

By the way, Steve L: that's the campus I'm headed to! Small world. How is Schneider about getting you home on time?

I graduated from TDI, Milton, FL about three years ago. I went with Schneider, partially because orientation is only 17 days. I don’t know how your jail time (i.e. conviction) will impact getting hired by Schneider though.

Good luck!

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Errol v ,

I know that there will be struggles and stress. That goes without saying for any job/career. Right now I work 12 hour days already so I'm not so much worried about the hours. I just don't want to end up stuck with some bum who's messy/dirty or doesn't know how to respect people. I do understand that this is a mountain that I will have to climb myself. Just looking to see which programs are LESS painful. Thank you all for your replies. I'm excited to start my new career.

double-quotes-start.png

Need suggestions on which companies offer the most painless on road training for rookies. I understand that I need to learn as much as possible. But I'm not looking forward to living with a stranger for a month. Not the end of the world. I've been in jail before. But not desirable. Which companies have the shortest (but still informative) training programs. Oh btw I'll be getting my CDL through a private school. TDI. Anybody been there??

double-quotes-end.png

What, exactly, are you looking for, NeeklODN? "Painless road training"? "Shortest training programs"?

Look through the CDL Training Diaries to see what trucking life is like. This isn't a cruise in the Caribbean. Trucking is a 24/7 type job, often outside in any weather.

As for "living with a stranger", remember first, these people are chosen by the company to help rookies get their feet wet. So these guys aren't just of the street. As your mentor's help is the best way to firm up your trucking game. Learn from them. That's what you're literally paid to do.

No shortcuts. If you're not in a training situation for 4-6 weeks, you won't learn anything.

NeeklODN, fear not, this is the best place to get your questions answered. Check out the resources on the three-bar menu (top left).

Here's some reading material for you:

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

First of all relax. "some bum..." is very rare as they don't last long as trainers. You will be better off choosing a company that fits your needs. What needs? Type of frieght, dry van , flatbed,refer, tanker. Do you want to have a pet or rider with you? Home time? How much and how often? There are more options. Look here.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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