Is Driving In The Northeast Really That Bad?

Topic 21030 | Page 1

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Ferret's Comment
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I'm from Connecticut and I drive almost exclusively in New England/Tri-State area. Rush hour is terrible but other than that you can cruise the speed limit or just under fine. I can think of only 1 time I've been stuck in terrible traffic and that was in Chicago. I just don't get why the north east gets so much hate because I love it.

Big Scott's Comment
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Because of traffic, terrain and lack of parking. You can get more miles in one day driving out West then in the Northeast. There are exceptions.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Go out West or down South sometime and you'll see what everyone's talking about. The Northeast is loaded with narrow roads, tough backing situations, heavy traffic, expensive tolls, aggressive drivers, lack of parking, and heavy truck restrictions.

The cities in the Northeast are the oldest in the country and there's a ton of infrastructure that was built long before anyone imagined trucks as large as they are today. Many of the traffic patterns were also designed quite poorly. I'm originally from Buffalo. They built a "hub and spoke" model for the roads. Sounded cute at the time I'm sure but it's a nightmare to navigate.

Now I live in the Adirondacks. 99% of the people in this country that have never been to Upstate New York have no idea that the vast majority of New York State is beautiful mountain wilderness.

All cities have tough traffic throughout the country. Doesn't matter where you are. But OTR driving overall is certainly the most difficult in the Northeast. It's not even debatable, really.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I will still take NYC over Atlanta any day of the week. At least I get paid xtra to sit in traffic, lol.

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

Ferret, It's not really the driving. The PA turnpike is a great trip, and I still get a kick out of tunnels. For a vacation, sure love to run around all of New England.

Professionally, I'll take a pass. Those picturesque, historic towns in Mass, NY, just not designed or even updated to accommodate 80' of truck efficiently.

Running all day up and down the hills is a mile killer for the OTR folk.

If you're regional or dedicated and the pay works then nothing at all wrong with running up there.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar
If you're regional or dedicated and the pay works then nothing at all wrong with running up there (northeast).

100% agree with this. I am never out of the NE, and fortunately once away from the major cities, absolutely beautiful country to drive through. Especially like now, the peak of fall color.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Go out West or down South sometime and you'll see what everyone's talking about. The Northeast is loaded with narrow roads, tough backing situations, heavy traffic, expensive tolls, aggressive drivers, lack of parking, and heavy truck restrictions.

The cities in the Northeast are the oldest in the country and there's a ton of infrastructure that was built long before anyone imagined trucks as large as they are today. Many of the traffic patterns were also designed quite poorly. I'm originally from Buffalo. They built a "hub and spoke" model for the roads. Sounded cute at the time I'm sure but it's a nightmare to navigate.

Now I live in the Adirondacks. 99% of the people in this country that have never been to Upstate New York have no idea that the vast majority of New York State is beautiful mountain wilderness.

All cities have tough traffic throughout the country. Doesn't matter where you are. But OTR driving overall is certainly the most difficult in the Northeast. It's not even debatable, really.

I have also been up in the adirondacks, and I must say it is absolutley beautiful up there. I have been through New York quite a lot. Very pretty. The cities though are huge man.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I have also been up in the adirondacks, and I must say it is absolutely beautiful up there

It certainly is. It truly is a mountain wilderness paradise up here.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I joked to my FM.once that if i slid on ice in WY, id go off the road and hit a cow and fence. but in NY??? its over the guard rail and down 2000 ft.

winter shutdown

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been up and down the east coast, and lived in RI for my entire life. No money to be made; Every road is slow going and hilly, therefore getting you fewer miles. You can go through 200 miles of midwest in a few hours. You can go through 200 miles of New England in a few days.

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