Manual In A Car Vs Manual In A Truck

Topic 21037 | Page 1

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Bryan Q.'s Comment
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So I as I come close to deciding what company I want to work for. I have a question about manual trucks. I own a 6 speed car. Is shifting a truck similar to shifting in a car ? Or is much more complicated ?

Old School's Comment
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Is shifting a truck similar to shifting in a car ? Or is much more complicated ?

Bryan, let's just say it's different. There are no synchronizers in a big rig transmission so you have got to time your shifts properly with the proper RPM and road speed. It's really awkward for most people who are accustomed to a manual car. It's all part of the learning curve.

Patrick C.'s Comment
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If ya can't find it, grind it! If the gear don't work for ya, make your own. LoL

Errol V.'s Comment
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So I as I come close to deciding what company I want to work for. I have a question about manual trucks. I own a 6 speed car. Is shifting a truck similar to shifting in a car ? Or is much more complicated ?

Old School is correct, POV's and big rigs don't match. But he left out the part that says you'll get used to it. You'll start by worrying about RPMs and such. But if you pay attention, and work to avoid frustration, you'll get it.

For training, and probably your road exam, you must practice double clutching when you shift both up and down. Later, you can glide shift, and hardly use the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Rob's Comment
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If ya can't find it, grind it! If the gear don't work for ya, make your own. LoL

Hahahahaha!!!!! That has been waaay too common of an occurrence for me. Most of my training I've been in an automatic, then randomly get thrown into the manual. This past wednesday I was in the manual and surprisingly shifted perfectly.....well, perfectly up until we got off the interstate 2 blocks from our yard. I forgot to put the splitter down and tried to take off in 9th and killed the truck. Side note had too much weight/cargo to fit in typical 28' PUP trailer, so I had a 36' (?) . It was a longer than usual run of about 240 miles....made me feel like more of a truck driver. rofl-3.gif

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Peter S.'s Comment
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Your biggest issue will be two fold . First you don't want to get your CDL on an automatic. If you do , unless they changed law , you will be restricted to companies that have automatic transmissions because it will be a restriction on your license . Second is when you go to work for your first company, try not to work for a company with an automatic equipped fleet . You really want to spend as much of your first to years as possible with a manual transmission. Fact is manual transmissions are becoming more common but most trucks are still manual and better suited for some areas of the country , not to mention the advantages of a manual over automatic in certain climatic or terrain situations . I've been driving almost seven years now and I still won't drive an automatic regularly, mainly because I don't drive local . I have driven them for short periods of time and will admit the big advantage to them is , Big City Driving ... But even still as a rookie get as much manual experience as possible. It will keep more doors open for prospective companies if and when you decide it's time to move on from another company.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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Second is when you go to work for your first company, try not to work for a company with an automatic equipped fleet. You really want to spend as much of your first to years as possible with a manual transmission

I have to disagree with this for two reasons:

1) It doesn't take very long to learn the basics of shifting. You don't need two years to become some ninja shifter. As long as you learn on a standard and get your license on a standard you're fine. You know how to shift. If you drive an automatic for a while and then eventually go back to a manual you'll have the hang of it again within a few days. It's not that complicated.

2) Very few major companies are going to have standards much longer. Most of them have already changed over to manuals or are in the process. I don't believe someone should be limiting their choices on who they go to work for based on the type of transmission they have.

Make sure you train on a standard and take your CDL exam on a standard. I do think that's important. But then go to work for the company that suits you best. Don't worry about the type of transmissions they have.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
TommyGun's Comment
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I drove manual transmissions in cars for almost 20 years before learning a 10 speed in school.

It's different.

The hesitation that you have to learn when to double clutch is counter-intuitive.

"Half Clutch-Neutral-Half Clutch-Shift"

It's really weird.

They told us in school that guys that drive sticks in 4 wheelers have the hardest time adapting because you have to unlearn habits you get away in cars because they are synchonized transmissions.

They were right in terms of learning to double clutch.

Upshifting is confusing at first too. Its totally opposite for your brain to think to rev the engine in order to slow down, lol.

Learn the shift pattern, watch how instructors do it, and watch how successful students do it.

There is a timing to it as well.

Funnily enough, if you know the beginning of the Addams Family theme song, thats the rhythum and speed you should shift.

"Da da da da....*snap* *snap* Da da da da....*snap* *snap*

The snapping of the fingers indicate when you need to touch the clutch.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Bryan Q.'s Comment
member avatar

Funnily enough, if you know the beginning of the Addams Family theme song, thats the rhythum and speed you should shift.

"Da da da da....*snap* *snap* Da da da da....*snap* *snap*

The snapping of the fingers indicate when you need to touch the clutch.

Thanks for that and thank all of you for the replies

I guess I have to learn to not go into nutreal to slow down confused.gif

G-Town's Comment
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I guess I have to learn to not go into nutreal to slow down

That's an understatement. Keeping the truck in gear when slowing down (up to an 80k GVCW) is absolutely vital !!! I could get into other related details of this, but they are all moot if not in-gear.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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