Request For Training And Work As A Driver

Topic 21050 | Page 1

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Zahari K.'s Comment
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Hello! My name is Zahari Krastev from Bulgaria. I and my wife Christina Krasteva we are due to arrive in the US in September 2018 with GREEN CARD /with the status of permanent residents/. I am a mechanical engineer, I have a professional driver's license since 1999 - category "C" according to European standard / truck without trailer with load capacity over 3500 kg / So far I have worked in the transport sector as head of transport and maintenance fleet. I also own a license for professional competence for international road haulage - European Union. I like the driving profession and my desire is to train and work as a truck driver. I received information about job requirements as a professional truck driver in the United States, and that it is necessary to undergo professional training for the issuance and obtaining of a US license. My question is: Can I start training with the opportunity to work after completing the course under these circumstances? We have not yet defined the area of residence because it will depend on the area of training and the area of employment afterwards. Do I need an American driving license to enroll for CDL school and work if so, what is the minimum period for possession of a US driving license ? Because my license to drive an international format is recognized in the US for 6 months, and I can reissue it with a US license within 1 month after my arrival.

I will look forward, to your reply! Regards! Zahari Krastev

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the Trucking Truth Forum.

Yes you must have a valid US Driver's License and establish 1 year of driving experience before applying for the CLP and enrolling in a school.

In the mean time it doesn't hurt to begin reading these threads...Good Luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, most companies hire from a lot of places. Once you find an employer you like, they will most likely hire from all across the country. So in your case, where you decide to live is really your own choice. You also may want to consider where consistent freight is because if you live there, you can quickly get back out onto the road after home time. It's not required, but some people like to live near a terminal so that they have easy access right to it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

millionmiler24's Comment
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Also, most companies hire from a lot of places. Once you find an employer you like, they will most likely hire from all across the country. So in your case, where you decide to live is really your own choice. You also may want to consider where consistent freight is because if you live there, you can quickly get back out onto the road after home time. It's not required, but some people like to live near a terminal so that they have easy access right to it.

When it comes to establishing residence do so from either the midwest or the south. Brett the owner of this site, told me that and I have since moved to Iowa and are so far perfectly happy there. The cost of living is low and there are ample opportunities for truck driving jobs there. When you are starting off I recommend staying OTR for minimum your first year, however 3 years OTR accident free will pretty much guarantee you a job most places unless something happens that could negatively affect ya.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Zahari K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for your attention and the advice! Can anyone describe what the step-by-step procedure is to start working as a truck driver immediately after my arrival in the US?

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

You won't be able to start immediately. First you need to get here, then get a regular Driver's license. Hold that license for a minimum of 1 year, then you can go to a CDL school to learn how to drive a truck and get your CDL-A.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Zahari K.'s Comment
member avatar

Is this a requirement for all states? Or does each company set its own rules? I see requirements from companies who want to own and retain a driving license from 3 to 6 months, from 6 to 12 months, from 1 to 3 years to start the course. I became acquainted with the law on the issue of driving licenses, and nowhere does it say that you have to keep one year driving license in order to have the right to enroll for a professional driver's license CDL-A. Obviously this is a company policy. Please if anyone knows and can recommend me a transport company that can and wants to invest in the learning and preparation of new drivers without experience, to share here / without these conditions for holding a driver's license for one year/ only with a new and fresh license /

and honorable colleagues, I would be grateful if someone could explain the meaning of holding a driver's license a year. What's the point of sitting in the cabinet at home for a year and I do not drive, owning and retaining a license does not give the experience, the experience comes with riding.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

You asked for the first steps...Susan outlined them for you. Three of us (2 moderators) basically gave you a similar answer.

You cannot apply for a CDL learners permit without first having a valid State issued driver's license (non commercial).

You must establish a permanent residence within a state before you can apply for the non commercial license.

Considering you are totally unfamiliar with US highways, driving laws, and have never driven in the US, safely operating a non-commercial vehicle for a period of one year is in your best interest and the rest of the motoring public.

All the US trucking companies care about is US driving experience and that you can keep a job in the US. You have no history here. Build one; establish residence, get your drivers license and find a job. There are no shortcuts.

Beyond that...if you want to call around to various companies, have at it...review this link:

Trucking Company Reviews

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I became acquainted with the law on the issue of driving licenses, and nowhere does it say that you have to keep one year driving license in order to have the right to enroll for a professional driver's license CDL-A

You may want to contact someone at the Department Of Motor Vehicles about this. It might be a rule that is set by the states. I'm not really sure. I know I've seen it before but I'm not sure if that's a Federal law or varies by state.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Zahari K.'s Comment
member avatar

It is clear that I will arrive in the United States will settle somewhere and get my green card and SSN and will renew my BG license with US license. So far, everything is clear, is not it? From there what? For example - I do not have a car I have nothing to drive, there is no way to gain experience with driving.

CDL Federal Requirements The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) regulates the rules and requirements for commercial drivers across the country. Though each state has its own application process, all states must adhere to federal requirements set forth by the FMCSA. Federal CDL Application Requirements The basic steps required by every state in accordance with FMCSA regulations to receive a commercial learner's permit and a commercial driver's license are as follows: Test for and obtain a commercial learner's permit (CLP). Hold your CLP for a minimum of 14 days. Take the road skills test for your commercial driver's license (CDL). If you are applying for any endorsements on your CDL, you may have additional knowledge and road skills exams. Commercial Learner's Permit In addition to any state-specific forms, tests, and identity/citizenship documents, the FMCSA requires all CLP applicants to provide: Your current driver's license. A 10 Year Driver History. Your state may check this electronically in their system, or require you to bring in a copy of your driving record. Contact your licensing office for details. A Medical Examination self-certification form. This documentation is needed to certify from a qualifying medical examiner that you will be physically able to operate a commercial vehicle. For details on how to self-certify, visit the FMCSA's Self-Certification FAQs. In addition, you will need to: Pass a knowledge and skills test. Tests may vary slightly according to state. However, minimum federal requirements require: A minimum of 30 questions. A passing score of at least 80%. Pay the associated fees. These will vary according to your state. Again, the application process, additional forms, fees, identity documents, and other requirements are at the discretion of your state. Please contact your local commercial driver licensing office for specifics on what your state requires, or visit our state-specific CDL guides. You're required to hold your CLP for at least 14 days before applying for your full commercial driver's license, as per federal guidelines. Your state may require you to hold it for longer. Commercial Driver's License Once you've satisfied the requirements above and practiced on the road with a driver possessing a CDL license, you may then apply for a CDL. Federal regulations states that you must: Hold your commercial learner's permit for at least 14 days. Provide a vehicle for your skills test of the same type that you plan to test for and drive once licensed. Pass the CDL skills test, which consists of 3 parts: Vehicle inspection. Basic controls exam. Road test. Some states may require additional steps, such as the completion of a CDL training course. CDL Endorsements & Waivers If you plan to add an endorsement to your CDL, additional testing, applications, and security checks may be needed. Examples of endorsements include: Tank vehicles. Passenger vehicles or school buses. Carrying hazardous materials. If you are a military veteran with experience driving military vehicles, you may be eligible to have your CDL skills test waived. For more information, visit our Veterans CDL Skills Test Waiver page. Other industries that states have the right to waive some of the CDL requirements for include: Farming. Emergency medical. Firefighters. Workers removing snow and ice. Contact your local commercial driver licensing office for details if you work in any of these industries.

So far I read the federal law that I do not have to wait for a year, it also writes to check for the state. And having done this, he even writes that I can apply directly to the CDL without having a normal license.

And how do you comment on this?

Applying Without a Regular VA License It's not required to have a regular Virginia driver's license to apply for a CDL, but if you do not currently hold a regular VA driver's license, you must bring additional documents with you to the Department of Motor Vehicles.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

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