Leaving A Job

Topic 21112 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Johnny Boy's Comment
member avatar

I started with a new company about a month ago. I could list the reasons but im going tp just simplify it and say i am not comfortable with this job and the kind of stress it puts on me. I have an offer for anither job but the orientation starts next week. If i send a message over qualcomm and tell them not to diapatch me next week because im bringing the truck in this weekend, can they hit me with a quit under dispatch on my DAC report?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I'd highly recommend you give proper notice to your current employer and tell the new company why you have to wait a few weeks to start. They'll understand and appreciate your honesty and professionalism.

That said.. why so distressed about a new job? Maybe someone here can offer advice?

Johnny Boy's Comment
member avatar

This new job is flatbed heavy haul. Pullins steel coils. I knew, and was prepared for the increased amount of physocal work so that isnt the problem. The problems i have are odd. I will use today as an example,

I started at 7 am and made a delivery with no issue. The trailer i have isnt a normal flatbed, its a coil wagon as they dont have any heavy haul flatbeds available right now, and my dispatcher tried to send me (for the fourth time) to a place that will not load it. I informed her of this and she got me a new load. The new load would have put me 1,000 lbs overweight so i told her and she got me a third load that i could carry. I was picking up in indiana and need to print a permit for the overweight load, she couldnt get me the permit for whatever reason and eventually emailed it to me and my phone wont print on the trucks printer. I decide to go ahead and pick the load up and hope the permit being on my phone will be acceptable. I get to the shipper and find out the appointment to get loaded was for 16:00 not 17:00 as my qualcomm stated (my fault for not checking if the load info was for est or cst i suppose) i call about that and get the man thats on call after 5pm. I accepted part of the responsibility for being late but mentioned that it might be good to let new drivers (ie, me) know things like that.

Things like this happen several times a week and it wouldnt be a problem but when i call about these issues they get ****ed off. They dont say anything out kf the way, i just hear it in their voices, but it makes me very uncomfortable and nervous about calling when i have issues. (Sounds *****y, but ive not had this problem at my previous two jobs) They have driver facing cameras and i was told before i showed up for orientation that they didnt. Half the time my dispatcher doesnt know what im going to get loaded with (number of coils, weight, etc). I would like to give a proper notice but im not sure how much longer i can deal with this.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Johnny Boy ,,.are you a job jumper? You say you started this job a month ago and then you say you didn’t have this problem at your 2 other jobs. Assuming, of course, that you started driving when you joined this forum that would put you at 3 jobs in a year and a half. You’ll never reach top tier driver with any company if you continue to bail when things are not going good. I would suggest you stick it out there and give them a chance to work out any kinks.

I wouldn’t want a lot of jobs in a short period on my resume...it doesn’t look good. Two weeks is the appropriate timeframe as far as notice. Good luck

Johnny Boy's Comment
member avatar

The first two jobs are kind of one job. I worked for covenant then moved to a company they own called star. I did start driving when i joined this forum though, and jumping jobs is a concern of mine. The problem is you never really know what a job is like unless you work it and the was thjngs are going here so far are pretty rough. I probably should give them some more time "to work the kinks out." It just seems like this is how things work in this company and its wearing me down with stress

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More