Any Current Barr Nunn Drivers?

Topic 21139 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Freebird's Comment
member avatar

Looking for what's the miles like weekly and if their reputation is good? Your thoughts of company? Is the pay as great as they advertise?

Thanks for your time and appreciate the info!

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

I don't drive for them. In fact I don't drive at all yet. But I like the way their pay scale is set up. Seems like they have a lot of little incentives too.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Looking for what's the miles like weekly and if their reputation is good?

Freebird, you've been around here an awful long time to be asking questions like that.

Is their reputation good? What do you think might have a dungeon in their basement or they're running a ponzi scheme?

As far as miles are concerned, every major trucking company has all of the miles you could ever handle for their Top Tier Drivers. There's no such thing as a major company that can't keep you moving. Now if you're not getting the job done they'll probably choose to make you sit around if that's what it takes to keep their better drivers moving. But if you're a great driver then any major company is going to run you as hard as you want to run.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Freebird's Comment
member avatar

Lol they might. I don't wanna get tied up to a chair in the dungeon man.

True about the miles. But with .51 cpm wasn't sure if the average miles even good drivers get would me much lower than with a company paying .41 cpm.

Thanks for the response.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Allow me to jump into this discussion with a little bit of business logic.

Brett made this statement...

As far as miles are concerned, every major trucking company has all of the miles you could ever handle for their Top Tier Drivers. There's no such thing as a major company that can't keep you moving.

Freebird still isn't convinced though...

True about the miles. But with .51 cpm wasn't sure if the average miles even good drivers get would me much lower than with a company paying .41 cpm.

As truck drivers we always seem to be vulnerable to fears that are based on misinformation in the first place. This whole commonly held notion that companies who are paying higher cents per mile are going to hold their drivers back so that they run less miles, is absolute baloney. This whole business is based on moving freight. The more freight you move, the more potential you have at making money. This is true for the company as well as it is for the driver. I don't know how these baseless rumors and innuendo keep their legs underneath them, but they are like household roaches who seem to keep showing back up no matter how hard you fight against them.

This is a results oriented business. Top performers make the top pay. Top performing trucking companies manage to squeeze out a profit, and their top performing drivers get rewarded accordingly. One of the foundational principles of success in a commodities business is that you have got to do a great volume of work. Nobody puts a business plan together in this business that takes the rogue approach of "paying their employees higher wages, and then having them produce less work." It is ludicrous!

Now, there are certain jobs in this industry that will be limited in a way, but it is still up to the driver to understand how to maximize his efforts for the best results. There are flat-bed jobs that I know of where the drivers work a small enough region of the country so that they are routed home each weekend. That in itself is a limiting factor, but worth it for the people who want to be home every weekend. The flat-bed companies have realized an efficiency in breaking things down like this so that they are working in a region where there is plenty of their type of freight that allows for just such a job. You are not going to run 3,500 miles a week and go home every weekend, but a really good driver will soon learn how to capitalize on his own efforts at time management so that he can turn this gig into a "gravy train" for both he and the company. Successful trucking companies are made of successful drivers - that is a link that is undeniable in the industry.

Now, let me give this one caveat. I have noticed that sometimes recruiting departments can be a little sketchy with the way they represent driver's pay. If you notice one company that seems to advertise a much higher CPM rate than most others, I would look into it further. I have noticed some of them are merely quoting the high end of their "sliding scale pay." While not an outright falsehood, it is a little misleading to do this. But, this reality still remains: The best drivers earn the best money.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I will throw this out there. When looking at driver salary, you have to factor the ability to earn bonuses. For example: I get paid 37 cpm. I always make the high mileage bonus. (Which is ridiculously easy to achieve at only 2,500 miles a week) I get an additional 4.5 cpm every quarter. Now I am past 1 year of safe driving, I am eligible for my safety bonus. 1 cpm paid every quarter. Add it all up, I make 42.5 cpm (0.425 dpm) hauling dry van. So for me to consider a different company, that is the pay point that would have to be exceeded.

Some companies offer higher cpm, but do not offer other bonuses or their other bonuses are difficult to achieve.

Drive Safe and God Speed

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Ernie drove for them but not for long.

Show yourself Ernie!

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

To add to this, yes a good cpm is nice but is worthless if you can't run a truck. If a driver is a hard worker and runs hard they'll make good money. If I recall correctly old school made great money at Western express back in the day with a lower cpm. It wouldn't make sense for any company to short drivers on miles purposely. They don't make money that way. I make .51 right now, not including bonuses and tarp pay. I've had a few 3000 mile weeks and still got home on Friday. It's doable.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Freebird's Comment
member avatar

I appreciate all of your guys response and honesty. That's what's great about TT. You get "real" responses. Not ppl going off on a rant about the good or bad.

I spoke with a recruiter today more in depth. I'm one who has a hard time trusting them because the business they're in is to get you in the door and they'll do whatever it takes.

I like the pay scale, the main terminal is 20 minutes away, the bonuses and their equipment sounds good. However, their layover pay and detention pay (although it is after only an hour) doesn't sound promising.

Layover is $50 the first 34 hours, then 50$ every 24 hrs after that. To me, that is horrid. Slow freight and your out on the road getting $50 a day, say something that the planner or dispatcher takes the wrong way, your starving.

They've offered me a job band set up an orientation but I'll be taking some time to think about the switch.

That layover pay worries me, cause I know there are slow times where you sit and I'm not one who really wants to be sitting out there for only 50$ a day. I'm wanting to make the 1500-1700 They claim their drivers average on a weekly basis.

Thanks again guys!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
That layover pay worries me

Freebird, you take an unusual approach to this career. I have never based my trucking decisions on what is going to happen if I am stuck sitting.

You will serve yourself much better by concerning yourself with what you can do to keep yourself rolling. A really great driver will be able to keep himself moving well, and when that occasional delay does happen then he learns to enjoy getting to take a little break.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Truck Driver Salary
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More