Best School In Dallas.

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Stephen M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi!

I'm wonder which school in Dallas is the best to go with, and wondering whats the best way to get CDL A. I don't want to do the company sponsored CDL program thing. I would like to go to an independent school here in Dallas and go from there. Is an accredited school worth it? Also wondering if its even worth going to school for CDL, I could pay some guy to teach me with his truck over the weekend and get me prepared for everything that's on the exam for about a thousands dollars. Lemme know what you guys think. Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rob's Comment
member avatar

I can't help with best school in Dallas, but I am curious why you are against company sponsored training. Many members here have taken advantage of that and are very successful. As far as paying some person to teach you I would strongly advise against it. Most companies require 160 hours of schooling because that's what their insurance company requires. I understand its cheaper to do it that way but in reality its likely going to be a waste of money. There are no shortcuts when it comes to learning to SAFELY operate a truck.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Stephen, welcome to Trucking Truth's forum!

Rob is exactly right - as a greenhorn rookie driver you will have a very difficult time getting hired without being able to produce a certificate of training that indicates 160 hours of a combination of classroom and driving training. Paying "Bubba" to teach you "everything" over the weekend will be a really good waste of money. Believe it or not, at the beginning of your career, that certificate is of more value than your shiny new CDL license.

Now, I'm assuming you've already done a little research and determined that you don't want to be a "slave" to some company's contractual obligation. If my assumption is correct then I hope you'll take a little time to read this great article that will help you understand Why We Like Company Sponsored Training.

All of us here are successful truck drivers, and we will always shoot straight with you. Unfortunately most trucking forums and chat rooms are made up of wannabes and failures which gives newcomers a really skewed look into this industry. You'll need some professional training, and we are pretty fond of the Company-Sponsored Training Programs.

By the way, take a look at tge following links. There's a tremendous amount of great help in them and I'm sure you will benefit from the time you spend with them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

We also have a listing of schools in Texas: truck driving schools in Texas

The guys above are right, though. Company sponsored training is a fantastic opportunity, but even if you choose not to go that route make sure you do go to a solid private school. These resources will help you understand how to choose a truck driving school:

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

I did company sponsored due to not having money to afford to be trained. Got fronted the training and all I had to do was 13 months to pay it off. You got to do what works with you, but I feel it's makes the most sense to do it with a company because most companies who take greenhorns already have their own schools.

Also another thing to consider. A company who had already invested in you will look past hiccups. I have hit another trucks mirror, broke a trailer door, and bent 2 wheels. They took me in talked to me and put me back out on the road. Your in a good spot for trucking regardless. Good luck!

Stephen M.'s Comment
member avatar

I can't help with best school in Dallas, but I am curious why you are against company sponsored training. Many members here have taken advantage of that and are very successful. As far as paying some person to teach you I would strongly advise against it. Most companies require 160 hours of schooling because that's what their insurance company requires. I understand its cheaper to do it that way but in reality its likely going to be a waste of money. There are no shortcuts when it comes to learning to SAFELY operate a truck.

I just rather pay 4k for a school and get more options and get the tuition reimbursements than 6-7k contract. If a regional or local job doesn't come along I'll do the OTR for about 3 months and get on a local company. I called international trucking school and they said its 200 hour class. Yeah I agree with doing the weekend CDL for 1k doesn't sound safe. I'll stick with a school, just trying to figure out witch one...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Stephen M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Stephen, welcome to Trucking Truth's forum!

Rob is exactly right - as a greenhorn rookie driver you will have a very difficult time getting hired without being able to produce a certificate of training that indicates 160 hours of a combination of classroom and driving training. Paying "Bubba" to teach you "everything" over the weekend will be a really good waste of money. Believe it or not, at the beginning of your career, that certificate is of more value than your shiny new CDL license.

Now, I'm assuming you've already done a little research and determined that you don't want to be a "slave" to some company's contractual obligation. If my assumption is correct then I hope you'll take a little time to read this great article that will help you understand Why We Like Company Sponsored Training.

All of us here are successful truck drivers, and we will always shoot straight with you. Unfortunately most trucking forums and chat rooms are made up of wannabes and failures which gives newcomers a really skewed look into this industry. You'll need some professional training, and we are pretty fond of the Company-Sponsored Training Programs.

By the way, take a look at tge following links. There's a tremendous amount of great help in them and I'm sure you will benefit from the time you spend with them.

Thanks so much for all the info! Looks like I'll be going with a private school like TDI or International trucking school. Defiantly be attending a accredited 160+ school. I'll be reading ever link you sent. I'm just trying to decide between TDI or International.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

You won't be able to get any local gigs with 3 months experience man. As it was mentioned before, there are no shortcuts. With 3 months, you're still considered a student. Most companies would make you go through orientation and training all over again. Company sponsored, private school or a community college/tech school is the way to go. What's the hurry if I may ask?

Rob's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I can't help with best school in Dallas, but I am curious why you are against company sponsored training. Many members here have taken advantage of that and are very successful. As far as paying some person to teach you I would strongly advise against it. Most companies require 160 hours of schooling because that's what their insurance company requires. I understand its cheaper to do it that way but in reality its likely going to be a waste of money. There are no shortcuts when it comes to learning to SAFELY operate a truck.

double-quotes-end.png

I just rather pay 4k for a school and get more options and get the tuition reimbursements than 6-7k contract. If a regional or local job doesn't come along I'll do the OTR for about 3 months and get on a local company. I called international trucking school and they said its 200 hour class. Yeah I agree with doing the weekend CDL for 1k doesn't sound safe. I'll stick with a school, just trying to figure out witch one...

Your statement about having more options if you pay your own way....while its true some companies hire recent grads but don't offer company sponsored training , don't fall into the trap we see here far too frequently of thinking your a "free agent". Too many people hear that there's a driver shortage and think that these companies are just gonna drool over ANYBODY that holds a CDL. What many people fail to see is its a shortage of experienced drivers who are DEPENDABLE, SAFE, RELIABLE. I didn't see you mention anything of that matter in your post, just want to make sure you understand that. Whether you go with paid training, or community college/private school you will still learn the bare minimum to pass the test. Your real learning will begin during training at whom ever you decide to work for.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Stephen looks for options:

I just rather pay 4k for a school and get more options and get the tuition reimbursements

What are "more" options? Once a company agrees to reimburse your tuition, you will sign a contract and be beholden to them to (still) pay that off.

You will be that mythical free agent if you just bite the tuition bullet on your own. But then again, as C.T. points out, you're still a rookie. Plan to stick with your first company for at least a year, if not more. There are several companies that hire recent grads (new CDL). Look in Trucking Company Reviews

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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