Trucking Company That Hires For Tanker Directly Out Of CDL School?

Topic 21216 | Page 3

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C T.'s Comment
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Maverick doesn't have dry van , and even if we did it would never be slow enough to swap sides. I don't know how serious or devoted you are to your beliefs. Have you considered what some flatbed loads could be used for? I don't ask because I don't care, but we haul lots of building products. What if you're delivering something that is helping to build something against what you believe in? Just something else to consider.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Indalecio,

I very much respect an individual who actually follows their beliefs. Too many people pick and choose what they want and don't want to follow which is very wrong. Its a shame.

I wouldn't ever recommend tanker for a rookie. I think you'll be fine no matter what trailer you have. Companies do respect the drivers personal religion. I have met plenty of muslims who refuse to haul pork and/or alcohol for example.

It will hurt your wallet and you may have to pass a load here and there which may result in sitting for a day until a load becomes available. But don't let money become your goal.

Either way, Prime's tanker division rarely does alcohol. They do a lot of cooking oil, syrup, chocolate from what I heard when I worked there.

Good luck my friend.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Indalecio's Comment
member avatar

Thank you. I may indeed take you upon your advice and simply go tot he flatbed division with prime this December, or wait for maverick to call me in jan/feb, as I do not wish to sabotage my career by crashing a tanker lol. Your advice has been thoroughly helpful either way. I will likely just go to Prime, because I really need to kickstart my finances and can't afford Maverick's waiting period.

Thanks for everyone's input!

Indalecio,

I very much respect an individual who actually follows their beliefs. Too many people pick and choose what they want and don't want to follow which is very wrong. Its a shame.

I wouldn't ever recommend tanker for a rookie. I think you'll be fine no matter what trailer you have. Companies do respect the drivers personal religion. I have met plenty of muslims who refuse to haul pork and/or alcohol for example.

It will hurt your wallet and you may have to pass a load here and there which may result in sitting for a day until a load becomes available. But don't let money become your goal.

Either way, Prime's tanker division rarely does alcohol. They do a lot of cooking oil, syrup, chocolate from what I heard when I worked there.

Good luck my friend.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Indalecio, not trying to persuade you to run dry van , but you really seem to think that dry van means you WILL be hauling alcohol. That is completely FALSE. SOME companies do haul a lot of alcohol. Others don't. I am willing to bet MOST dry van companies RARELY haul alcohol. I HAVE NOT ONCE HAD AN ALCOHOL LOAD IN OVER 14 MONTHS. Not once!!! I just can't let blind ignorance rule the day. So, Dry Van does NOT mean hauling alcohol. The very few alcohol loads Wolding does do are ALL brokered loads. We have zero direct alcohol loads. It would VERY easy to avoid alcohol loads. There are certain companies where alcohol loads are a staple of their business. Millis Transfer comes to mind. But not every dry van company is run beer and booze all over the country. I personally think you may have watched Smokey and the Bandit one too many times.

Drive Safe and God Speed.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I think it's great that you want to start with something like flatbed (I'm not as gun-hoe about tanker considering winter is coming up). If that's what you want to do, go for it. But Patrick does have a good point--not all dry van companies run alcohol all the time. Millis is a no-go, and Swift also hauls a lot of beer. Although Swift has alot of dedicated accounts that don't haul alcohol at all (like Home Depot dedicated or Lowe's). Same sort of thing with a place like Werner and Schneider--they haul plenty of beer also but probably have plenty of dedicated accounts that don't haul any alcohol.

I really like your idea of going over to Prime. That's probably what I would do if I were in your shoes. They pay rookies well and you can always jump over to their tanker division if you decide you don't like flatbed. They will do a good job of training you as well.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I talked with a guy in the Prime tanker division and he said those west coast runs for wine are very rare, and that by staying regional I could avoid those deliveries if they know ahead of time, about my beliefs. I have considered flatbed just to have 0% chance of carrying anything like alcohol, but then people say that if volume for flatbed is slow, they put you on dry van , which may very well contain it.

So it's like I can't win for losing. Tanker is a lower chance it seems like, but flatbed is an option. Ultimately as long as my creator sees me making an effort to do the right thing, he will forgive me if I have to deliver it once in a blue moon and "take one for the team."

Such is life.

I'm a flatbedder at Prime, and I've never heard of anyone going to dry-vans during slow times.

1- In my experience we really don't slow down, especially as a company driver. There may be times of the year where freight rates are down for lease ops, but us company drivers get cpm regardless of rates, and will always stay running.

2- Our flatbed trucks aren't set up to pull vans. The 5th wheel is mounted in a different spot and the headache rack would prevent me from hooking up to a van.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

Yes going along with Turtles post here. I did flatbed all last winter and can assure you as a company driver I didn't feel any slow down at all. I know some of the lease guys may have issues in the winter although I am not sure, but as a company driver you are only concerned with the miles and could care less about revenue on the load and I can assure you the miles are there year round in flatbed.

Indalecio's Comment
member avatar

Well it looks like Prime Flatbed is where I'll start and then move over to Tanker at a later time. Thanks all!

Indalecio's Comment
member avatar

Of course Swift decides to throw me another IMMEDIATE option to come with them next week for the flatbed division. As if my decision making wasn't already confused enough.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Of course Swift decides to throw me another IMMEDIATE option to come with them next week for the flatbed division. As if my decision making wasn't already confused enough.

How can we help? We have successful drivers with Swift (like me) and Prime.

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