Cheating On Logbook/e-logs

Topic 21228 | Page 1

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Mark .'s Comment
member avatar

I realize a driver may get violations on logbooks/e-logs when the driver had not intended to cheat. My question is, can a truck driver make a living (lets say $30K and up) without intentionally cheating on the logbook/e-logs or does a truck driver have to cheat the log books to make living?

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
can a truck driver make a living (lets say $30K and up) without intentionally cheating on the logbook/e-logs

Yes, and it can be done easily. A hard working individual could even double your suggested dollar amount.

Keep in mind that doing this job requires not only long hours, but erratic ones also. Sometimes I may work all night, or half the day and long into the night - my schedule is determined by my loads. A successful driver really determines his own worth, and therefore his paycheck by his willingness to be creative and flexible with the demands of the job.

Generally a decent rookie driver will make close to 40,000 dollars or maybe better his rookie year. All during that year he will be learning how to improve his performance and results.

Remember that it is just as critically important to your employer that you are not "cheating" your logs as it is to you. Regardless of what you may have read, these major carriers do everything they can to keep you turning the miles without cheating the HOS rules.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mark .'s Comment
member avatar

I just edited my question so there's no confusion on a "yes" response?

I realize a driver may get violations on logbooks/e-logs when the driver had not intended to cheat. My question is, can a truck driver make a living (lets say $30K and up) without intentionally cheating on the logbook?

I just edited my question so there's no confusion on a "yes" response?

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

As long as you are understanding that you don't have to cheat, and that your employer will be fully expecting you to obey the rules, then there is no confusion on my part.

Part of this whole e-logs thing is to keep both the driver, and the company, compliant with the law. The days of running two and three log books are over.

Is that clear enough?

Mark .'s Comment
member avatar

As long as you are understanding that you don't have to cheat, and that your employer will be fully expecting you to obey the rules, then there is no confusion on my part.

Part of this whole e-logs thing is to keep both the driver, and the company, compliant with the law. The days of running two and three log books are over.

Is that clear enough?

Thank you for your response Old School. With my clarifying the question, I did not mean to imply that there was confusion on your part. I had just reread my post and asked the same question in two different ways so I didn't want there to be any confusion with anybody. I should have reworded the question before posting it. Yes, you were clear and again, thank you for your response.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Mark, keeping your logs is a little bit confusing during that first year. It is all just a small part of the steep learning curve we talk about here. Most rookie drivers short change themselves when it comes to their logs. Learning to conserve your drive time is all part of the time management skills that a rookie driver will develop over time. Even after years of driving I'm still learning little tricks that help me be more productive.

You don't need to concern yourself with anyone pushing you to cheat, or even with thinking you can't make any money because of the restrictions you're working under. It's easy to find people complaining of such things on line, but if you had any way to verify who these people were you'd find that they do not understand how to make this career work. This job requires individuals who can think for themselves and are willing to really learn how to work efficiently under the current regulations.

One of the best things a rookie driver can do for himself is...

Learn The Logbook Rules (HOS)

You may find this article about The Hardest Part About Starting A Truck Driving Career to be of intetest to you. It's not so much about keeping your logs, but it may help you get a feel for the things that cause people to stumble when looking into getting started at this career.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
MC1371's Comment
member avatar

Short answer. Yes! You can make decent money running elogs. No you don't have to be "creative" beyond a few minor tips.

I run elogs , and I don't cheat. Year to date I'm over 50k gross pay.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
member avatar

Got to chime in here. The term "cheat" can be loosley used. Running elogs a driver can't "cheat" the drive line. I expect that was the most abused on paper. That said, fueling on duty and going off duty while washing windshield is technically "cheating"..... Sitting 7 hours at a shipper and going on duty to check in and going off while you sit back against door, not getting loaded, is technically (per the law) "cheating" I don't know about you other guys/gals but run an OTR reefer without "cheating" as mentioned above and tell about how good your 34 hour resets every 6-7 days pay... Really!

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Got to chime in here. The term "cheat" can be loosley used. Running elogs a driver can't "cheat" the drive line. I expect that was the most abused on paper. That said, fueling on duty and going off duty while washing windshield is technically "cheating"..... Sitting 7 hours at a shipper and going on duty to check in and going off while you sit back against door, not getting loaded, is technically (per the law) "cheating" I don't know about you other guys/gals but run an OTR reefer without "cheating" as mentioned above and tell about how good your 34 hour resets every 6-7 days pay... Really!

I gotta agree with you here, not possible to run reefer and make a good living without "cheating" like this. According to the letter of the law, technically you should be On Duty while waiting in a dock. But truth is nobody does it except noobs who don't know any better--we all log off duty or sleeper. And I've never heard of anyone getting cited for doing this as long as you log some On Duty time when you arrive at the shipper. It's considered acceptable to log Sleeper while being loaded or unloaded.

Besides logging Sleeper for live loads/unloads, which is considered acceptable anyway, I don't cheat at all and I'm on track to make about 70k this coming year. So it's totally possible to make a good living without breaking a bunch of rules all the time.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Without cheeting, in six months, I have grossed over $19,000. This puts me on track to hit $40,000 or close to it. My pay will go up as I drive.

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