Random Question About Flashing Lights

Topic 21229 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
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Great point on the lights. During the pre-trip get into the habit of wiggling the electrical connector where it enters the socket on the trailer. If the lights flicker, there is a short in the connection. Many time the pins are loose or fouled by accumulated dirt. I keep a can of dri-air for blowing out dirt from the pin connector and socket. Sometimes the connections are just plain worn. I also carry wooden coffee stirrers to use as a shim to tighten up worn connections.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Pianoman's Comment
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I also carry wooden coffee stirrers to use as a shim to tighten up worn connections.

I just use my keys. That is, when I don't leave them locked in the truck.

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

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I also carry wooden coffee stirrers to use as a shim to tighten up worn connections.

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I just use my keys. That is, when I don't leave them locked in the truck.

rofl-3.gif

Laughing with you, not at you...

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Misery indeed loves company!

Jim A.'s Comment
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I keep a small screwdriver in the door pocket for that. When I drove for swift a lot of their trailer pins in the connector would get closed. slip the blade in the slot on trl pin a little it would tighten them up no more bad connection

Patrick C.'s Comment
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The only thing that comes to mind is in Germany. On the autobahn those cars that are hauling butt will flash their lights when they are several hundred meters behind you to let you know they are approaching rapidly and to get out of their way.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

It's a European thing... when overtaking another vehicle you are supposed to flash your lights in order to let the vehicle ahead know that you are passing. I am originally from Boston, MA and have seen this practice often. You have to understand that the 14 north east states are like their own country and drivers are crazy there!! Lol

icecold24k's Comment
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I am originally from Boston, MA and have seen this practice often. You have to understand that the 14 north east states are like their own country and drivers are crazy there!! Lol

Yes I must agree with this 100%. It is a whole different world up there lol.

Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

I was thinking the only reason they would be flashing at you from a lane to the left of you as they passed you would be to let you know they were there. However, if they were flashing at you from a lane to the right of you then maybe they were trying to tell you that you had cleared them and could move over in front of them it you wanted to. I was told many years ago if you wanted to let a trucker know they had room to get in front of you and did not have a CB you could simply turn off your headlights and then back on to inform them when it was safe to complete the passing maneuver and they typically would flash their trailer lights to you to say thank you. Some people may not feel comfortable turning lights off so instead may feel better just going from low to high to low instead.

Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

I've seen people do it to trucks all the time, and I do live in New England. Also, in the trips I've been on, I've noticed people at a lot more courteous when it comes to high beams. Up here, people almost never turn off their brights on 2 lane roads in the middle of the night. Unlike most kids, on car rides, I like to look out of the window. I find myself squinting so badly when in those situations. Even after my mom flashes them to let them know, they still don't turn them off. Either that or they turn them off the second they're about to go by us.

As for the flashing, I know lots of people do it when you are blinding them w/ high beams. When you say passing, do you mean on 4 lane highway or 2 lane passing zone? If it's 2 lane, maybe they are doing it to "warn" anyone who may or may not be coming the other way? Just a thought...

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

I've seen people do it to trucks all the time, and I do live in New England. Also, in the trips I've been on, I've noticed people at a lot more courteous when it comes to high beams. Up here, people almost never turn off their brights on 2 lane roads in the middle of the night. Unlike most kids, on car rides, I like to look out of the window. I find myself squinting so badly when in those situations. Even after my mom flashes them to let them know, they still don't turn them off. Either that or they turn them off the second they're about to go by us.

As for the flashing, I know lots of people do it when you are blinding them w/ high beams. When you say passing, do you mean on 4 lane highway or 2 lane passing zone? If it's 2 lane, maybe they are doing it to "warn" anyone who may or may not be coming the other way? Just a thought...

I was actually referring to highways that have two or more lanes travelling in the same direction.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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