Hard Braking Event

Topic 21314 | Page 1

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Kash's Comment
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Who else deals with this hard braking critical event stuff? I’m getting really tired of it. I just got a hard braking and now they’re pulling me into the office later. They’re trying to say I was tailgating when I know I wasn’t. Considering there’s a thing on the dash that beeps loud if I do. This is just getting ridiculous.. I feel like if I even cough the wrong way my dm is gonna call me into the office. Smh, I know I’m not the only one dealing with this right? Anyone know companies that don’t use CER?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I think most companies have the critical event sensors in their trucks.. I know mine certainly does and I don't work for a mega carrier.

Maybe you should review the Smith System of driving. Sometimes hard brakes are unavoidable if say another vehicle cut over too closely in front of you. But being more vigilant about safety and watching your speed, following distance, etc., will certainly reduce the likelihood of having a hard brake event.

Stay safe.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Kash, guess who has all the marbles? Your company, who does not want to chance having to pay out big bucks for a simple rear ender.

The truck has a sensor that reads and reports tailgate distance to the office. At Swift the magic number is one second apart. This is actually too close for comfort for me, but I was still called in to discuss my tailgating twice the three weeks.

I recently posted a big article on using the Adaptive Cruise Control to manage that tailgating. Read it.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Are you hard breaking or are the trucks sensors breaking at bridges for you? Most companies can tell if it's you or the truck. My truck starts beeping at me when I'm 1.4 seconds behind someone.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Are you hard breaking or are the trucks sensors breaking at bridges for you? Most companies can tell if it's you or the truck. My truck starts beeping at me when I'm 1.4 seconds behind someone.

A hard brake event by itself will notify your DM and/or FM. And tailgating will also notify your office.

Kash, you need to modify your driving style so the sensors don't tattle on you. If you're going to fight the system (as in"They’re trying to say I was tailgating when I know I wasn’t.") you'll soon be looking elsewhere for employment.

Also when Safety pulls you in, don't get out the "but .... buts". Life will be harder on you if you don't learn how to handle both your driving and your attitude.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Joshua P.'s Comment
member avatar

I got two hard breaks one i almost missed a turn and second a light changing red, both times were empty now both times there was nobody in front of me so when my dm pulled it up, what you have to say would be plausible. So if you get a bs event they can look it up on the computer, prime has a line graph showing the speed, following distance and other vehicle speed as the second line, that will say alot and can prove your story. Also if you have a dashcam you can show your company the footage in your own defense.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Tom W.'s Comment
member avatar

I know it is frustrating having to go in and explain every time the alarm goes off. Over time though as long as you never get involved in any accidents or incidents then the office folks likely will hassle you about it less and less when you do get some critical event.

In fact just last night a car came to a complete stop at night on tx highway 34 right in front of me. 65 to zero in about eight seconds for no reason that I could see. I got the hard breaking trigger but not a word from anyone in the office about it.

Just a couple years ago I would have been signing papers and getting the talk from one of the route planners.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

At Swift, the safety person says you get five tailgating calls in the previous 12 months. I don't plan to find out what happens next.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

My first hard brake happened while I was on a back road in the middle of BF Colorado early in the morning. I was empty, legal speed limit just changed to 65mph, was just 45. I was building up speed when all of a sudden, about 12 deer (yes I counted them), meandered across the road just barely in view.

Once my DBL (Schneider for DM) was in the office a few hours later, I got a message asking what happened assuming wildlife. I replied later with the story and didn't hear a thing afterwards.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Reyn R.'s Comment
member avatar

I saw a truck get cut off so drastically that there was only a split second reaction time to avoid crushing that little car. The car was in the left lane directly next to the truck who was in the right lane. The car sped up & cut off the truck to make a right turn directly in front of the truck!! Craziest maneuver I've ever witnessed... Well I've seen quite a few, but this struck me in such a way that the first thing I will install in my truck will be a dash cam, just for crazy moments just like this. That trucker was visibly shaken. His truck looked like a giant piece of jello, shaking back n forth from that hard brake! Be safe out there ladies & gentlemen. God be with each & everyone of you!

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