Hard Braking Event

Topic 21314 | Page 2

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Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

If you can count them, that's when you know it's bad. Lol.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Kash you have well over two years of truck driving experience. TWO YEARS, not two months!!! I'd expect a post like this from a rookie with only a few months of experience. You're not "that".

The root cause of hard braking events should be no surprise to you...by now you should have mastered space management, developed above average situational awareness skills, know right from wrong in a truck, proactively adjust to traffic flow, and understand timing of stale traffic lights. If done correctly, all of the above should reduce the chance of a hard braking event to less than a percent. However careless, ambivalent driving is just that, and not to be blamed on technology, a zealous DM or a safety guy doing their job in an attempt to prevent you from killing yourself and others around you.

In over 5 years I've had three hard braking events in total, two in my first three months, the other one, 3 years ago. All three were my responsibility and I owned my mistake.

A quick review of your previous posts... you've had a "July Fourth Parade" of issues. In no particular order

  • Threatened to press charges against your mentor
  • Quit Swift after 5 days (cause they were too strict)
  • Smoked weed which prevented you from going to Melton
  • Back at Swift again, complained about hard braking events with Swift, left or fired from Swift
  • Accident in parking lot, couple of tickets, went to Werner
  • Complained about Werner orientation, claim all recruiters lie, left Werner and went to Schneider
  • Lane changing violations in a car
  • Ripped a fuel hose off a pump at a TS
  • Had your GF on your truck without getting permission from your company

I invite you all to read Kash's rather colorful posting history...

Kash for your own safety and the well being of everyone around you; please f'ing pay attention, take responsibility for your actions/decisions, do your job and stop wasting our time whining the blues about your chronic screw-ups and conflicts.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Reyn R.'s Comment
member avatar

A quick review of your previous posts... you've had a "July Fourth Parade" of issues. In no particular order; threatened to press charges against your mentor, quit Swift after 5 days (cause they were too strict), smoked weed which prevented you from going to Melton, back at Swift again, complained about hard braking events with Swift, left or fired from Swift, accident in parking lot, couple of tickets, went to Werner, complained about Werner orientation, claim all recruiters lie, left Werner, went to Schneider, lane changing violations in a car, ripped a fuel hose off a pump at a TS and having your GF on your truck without getting permission from your company.

Kash for your own safety and the well being of everyone around you; please f'ing pay attention, take responsibility for your actions/decisions, do your job and stop wasting our time whining the blues about your chronic screw-ups and conflicts.

Woah! That’s not a good memory, that’s a digital hard drive for a brain! Note to self, don’t screw up in my truck but if I do? Definitely not posting it on here!

I only hope Kash reads that laundry list of errors on his part & takes heed to grow up by owning his screw ups. It can only go 2 ways: he puts in the effort & becomes safer or the road will push back until he’s out of a job. Either way, only Kash can control how Kash responds to reasonable criticism. We either learn or we burn.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jim A.'s Comment
member avatar

I have had 2 hard braking events both when bob tailing. Both were when i was driving under 10mph. I BT every day and have learned easy on the brake pedal. LOL

Jim A.'s Comment
member avatar

I invite you all to read Kash's rather colorful posting history...

Wow just read his history just wow

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I just got my first CE today. it was a front end collision that activated my on guard and hit the brakes. no one was around. Not even a bird. I called the mechanic that said something could have flown up off the ground and hit or blocked the sensor causing it. He also said the radar plate sometimes need to be adjusted similar to headlamp directions.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I invite you all to read Kash's rather colorful posting history...

Wow!!!

Kash, I've gotta say you have a remarkable history for such a short time in this industry. I've gotta agree 100% with G-Town here. I think it's time for you to get your act together, don't you?

Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

Reading that history is just... wow. Like G-Town said, own up to yourself, maybe try again in a year or two. Because now, nobody's gonna want you.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Thanks G-Town.

I almost brought up Kash's history on his last post, but decided to just wait and see if he would start owning up to his mistakes. I'm glad you pointed it out.

Kash, it's really easy to let yourself fall into the typical driver's approach of this all being a struggle of "us against those stupid people in the office." That approach will ruin your chance at any type of real success in this career. If you're having hard braking events, about 98% of them are going to be driver error.

What separates the professionals from the mediocre drivers is their ability to properly analyze why things are going wrong for them. You are a long ways from that ability at this point because you aren't even recognizing these events as being "critical."

You are hung up on thinking this is all a huge waste of your time having those stupid people in the office analyze your every move. You have developed a long list of reasons why you are considered a "high risk" driver at this point. They are merely trying to put the ball in your court to see what you will do with it. They are trying to help lead you into the path of success. So far you've given them very little reason to continue their efforts with you.

Own your mistakes and realize that you alone are responsible for what happens with that rig. I know you've seen us pointing out the essential value of maintaining a proper following distance. That one factor alone will help you tremendously. You don't have to drive fast or aggressively to turn big miles out here. I drive my rig like an 85 year old little lady who is scared to death she's gonna wreck the thing - I can still average well over 3,000 miles each week.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

This guy had me confused because not only did he change his name more than a few times "Kahzi, Z, Kash"....but he listed his residence in FL, stated he was from NH, but asked about chamging his CDL to NV in "two weeks". Then a month later "I live in Arizona". He came off the swift dedicated in AZ to go back OTR to get home to NH more WHAT????

He also started at 21 (2 years ago)....was fearful he would get fired from Werner for having "a girlfriend on the truck"....but hates OTR because he rarely sees his "wife and daughter".

He went to Werner for a Hazmat dedicated running the northeast and NYC so he could be home. Then he left there because when comimg back out, he sat too long waiting for a load...near home....WHAT????

my head is spinning

oh dear god. please someone tell me tbis guy isnt running Hazmat in NYC while running red lights, pulling out fuel hoses, and having accidents in the parking lot.

he claimed he got fired from swift AFTER being snowed in at home for a week, then requesting 12 days off....."my DM told Phoenix I quit"...they probably didnt know where the hell HOME was.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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