Wannabe Trucker

Topic 21328 | Page 1

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Andy S.'s Comment
member avatar

Just lost my job and i'm 59, been thinking about this for sometime, now that i'm getting serious about making the commitment but don't know the details of everyday life. looking for some feedback on the following:

1. When you get time off, does the company rig go to the closest terminal , and you have to drive your personal car home or does the rig go home with the driver?

2. When you pick up a trailer and you head to the scales, what happens if you're stopped by a trooper or you get to the scales and its to heavy? Who pays?

3. Who typically pays for Turnpike and highway toll transponders and refills?

4. I'm very particular to how my rig would look, both interior and exterior, are there truck washes on a regular bases? who pays?

I'm thinking about hanging out at local truck stop and talking to some of the drivers about there experiences. Your thoughts?

Thank youconfused.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Andy thinks:

I'm thinking about hanging out at local truck stop and talking to some of the drivers about there experiences. Your thoughts?

Sorry, at the moment I don't have time for extended answers. They will come. But talking to anonymous truck drivers is a mistake - no accountability on their part. I suggest you hang out here.

Quick answers: #1, most companies allow you to get near your house with the rig. A nearby truck stop is good. #2: Troopers are human too. If you are getting to the nearest scale, your ok. It's rare that a state trooper hauls a truck scale with them. You'll be passing a CAT scale before you hit a chicken coop. #3: Your company will get you a turnpike pass thingy in the truck, or at very least will quickly refund that expense. #4: This varies among companies. The inside is mostly up to you.

Check these out to get you started on your new career:

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Many companies allow you to take the truck home, if you have room for it on your property. Otherwise, you find the nearest truck stop or make a deal with a local big box store to leave it on home time. Most major truck stops have CAT scales. They usually cost $11.00 for the first weigh and $2.00 per reweigh. You'll learn more about that while out with a trainer. There are phone apps to help you find the nearest. If you don't have a smart phone, there are directories at the truck stops. As Errol, said companies have transponders in the trucks for the tolls. I have never been to a truck wash except at the terminal. Each company has their own policy on how often they will pay for a truck wash. You don't always have time for it. You can wash it more often at your expense. In addition to the links Errol gave you, these can also help. Company-Sponsored Training Programs are a great way to earn while you learn.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Cat Scales:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Andy S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks!

Andy thinks:

double-quotes-start.png

I'm thinking about hanging out at local truck stop and talking to some of the drivers about there experiences. Your thoughts?

double-quotes-end.png

Sorry, at the moment I don't have time for extended answers. They will come. But talking to anonymous truck drivers is a mistake - no accountability on their part. I suggest you hang out here.

Quick answers: #1, most companies allow you to get near your house with the rig. A nearby truck stop is good. #2: Troopers are human too. If you are getting to the nearest scale, your ok. It's rare that a state trooper hauls a truck scale with them. You'll be passing a CAT scale before you hit a chicken coop. #3: Your company will get you a turnpike pass thingy in the truck, or at very least will quickly refund that expense. #4: This varies among companies. The inside is mostly up to you.

Check these out to get you started on your new career:

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Andy S.'s Comment
member avatar

What about equipment, like Truckers GPS, etc.? anything to purchase? Thanks

Thanks!

double-quotes-start.png

Andy thinks:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I'm thinking about hanging out at local truck stop and talking to some of the drivers about there experiences. Your thoughts?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Sorry, at the moment I don't have time for extended answers. They will come. But talking to anonymous truck drivers is a mistake - no accountability on their part. I suggest you hang out here.

Quick answers: #1, most companies allow you to get near your house with the rig. A nearby truck stop is good. #2: Troopers are human too. If you are getting to the nearest scale, your ok. It's rare that a state trooper hauls a truck scale with them. You'll be passing a CAT scale before you hit a chicken coop. #3: Your company will get you a turnpike pass thingy in the truck, or at very least will quickly refund that expense. #4: This varies among companies. The inside is mostly up to you.

Check these out to get you started on your new career:

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
What about equipment, like Truckers GPS, etc.? anything to purchase? Thanks

This might help: Items To Bring To CDL School, Training, and OTR

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
member avatar

I'll Give you my situation.

*Disclaimer- This is just my company. I'm sure it varies a tad from company to company.

I take the tractor home. Have room for it

You get pretty good at weights. I know my gross of product before I roll. My tractor has a dash gauge that gives me approximate weight on driver axles. At very least I'm confident that I'm not over 80k before I scale out

I driver reefer. We are at truck washes after every load 95% of time for trailer "wash outs". Since we are food grade carriers its the law. We get tractor wash every 10-14 days. It ain't cheap!! Company pays

I use GPS that encompassed within my trucks mobile computer system coupled with good old atlas

Don't hang around truck stops like Errol says....I don't even like doing that but seem inclined fairly regular like.

There is plenty to chew on right here within TT.....Have a seat and stick around....

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

The main thing to take for school is clothes, at least seven days worth., toiletries, any meds, cell phone and chargers. Look at the link Errol gave you, you'll get some awesome info from that. Depending on what company you go with may also require different things.

Team 1 Trucker's Comment
member avatar

Andy, I’m 57, just started this new adventure ( yes it’s a career, but it’s MUCH more). For what it’s worth, here are my observations.

Trucking Truth and this forum are your best source for SOLID VERIFIABLE INFORMATION

High Road is the best online CDL training program you will find

You will NEVER get enough sleep while on the road

You WILL make mistakes

You WILL get lost

You WILL get frustrated (for me it’s the “hurry up and wait”)

Others (friends and family) will think you are crazy

You WILL have experiences that you NEVER DREAMED OF

You will meet some of the BEST and encounter some of the WORST that humanity has to offer

If you are serious, want to learn and are up for the challenges that WILL come, you are in for a great new life.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

My company pays for 2 truck washes per.month and unlimited at the terminals. i pay for tbr rain X $8 cause i like it. its tax deductible.

scale tickets are also reimbursed. anything a company doesnt pay for is tax deductible. we have a company provide GPS but i also have a rand mcnally. GPS are tools and not as reliable as the atlas.

companies differ on what you can add. my company has a detail shop where you can buy and have them install CBs, refrigerators, tv, satellites. many have phone and tv packages that get deducted from your pay at a cheaper fleet rate.

the most imoortant thing to concentrate on is learning to drive the rig safely and get through training. too many new drivers focus on the wrong issues and dont make it out of training, let alone a full year.

good luck

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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