Company Does You Wrong

Topic 21339 | Page 1

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Jeffrey D.'s Comment
member avatar

Who does a driver get should of when a company turns you in for things you did not do?

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

Without knowing anymore about your situation I would have to say a lawyer. Just know that big companies have multiple lawyers on payroll and they are probably better than the lawyer you can afford. If you truly are innocent of whatever the company "turned you in for," then it may be worth it to seek legal counsel. Your question is very broad and vague though, so it may be hard to get answers here.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Jeffrey, welcome to our forum!

There's no way for us to answer this one unless you explain to us what's going on. I'll personally make it a point to respond to you, but there's way too much left out here for us to even have a clue what's going on.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

"turned you in" as in reported you to DOT for something or your states DMV? or as in put something on your DAC? or do you mean pulled you in amd terminated you?

getting a lawyer should not be your first step. there are people to talk to...fleet managers..supervisors...safety departmemts...etc. lawyers and law suits are drastic.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to Trucking Truth. We're glad you're here. We also need a bunch more background on your post before anyone can give you any bit of useful information.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Jeff, if you decide to continue in this forum, it's OK to put the details out here. There's no hate or flame, just unvarnished honesty. We are here to help you figure out what's going on.

More details get you a more definite answer.

Jeffrey D.'s Comment
member avatar

Last Saturday evening the truck I was driving broke down. I called the owner and told him. He said to get it off the road and go home. I felt that the truck had issues any way. All was good on my pretrip except a small radiator leak. Anyway I told the owner I wasn't going to drive for him anymore so he turned me in for abandoning the truck. What do I do?

Jeff

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

He said to get it off the road and go home??? That seems unusual.

If he put it on your DAC that you abandoned the truck you can file a dispute with HireRight, the company that manages the DAC. The owner would basically have to prove that you did indeed abandon the truck or they'll remove it from your record.

Regardless, most companies realize that the DAC is loaded with false claims. It's pretty much the first place anyone goes to be vindictive. Personally I've had two different people make false claims against me during my career. It's very common, unfortunately.

The DAC really has very little credibility with anyone at this point. Any company you apply to will ask you to explain your side of it if they see that on the report.

I would file a dispute with HireRight. That's about all you can do. It isn't worth pursuing beyond that.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Assuming you still have access to the truck, Call the owner, and agree to take it wherever he wants it delivered, and hand over the keys personally. Get the whole conversation and agreement in writing, or recorded. Take pictures of the truck to protect against any future damage claims.

If you don't have the truck, you can still call him, and work something out possibly. Just be very level headed, and professional about the whole thing.

There are other avenues, too, but I am still a rookie, and am unfamiliar with them.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

You did abandon the vehicle. You should of finished the load after the truck was repaired and made arrangements to return it to their yard before quitting.

That is a stain on your DAC you will have to own. The only way to get it removed is to implore your previous employer. Other than that, you have the right to dispute it and leave your own statement about it on your DAC. That way it will give any future employers a chance to read your side. If they even bother reading any statements about it after they see the abandonment.

My best suggestion is to own your mistake. If you find a company that is willing to give you a chance, admit you handled the situation all wrong and emotionally. Let them know you have learned a valuable lesson from your mistake.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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