My First Flatbed Load

Topic 21515 | Page 1

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Tracy H.'s Comment
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I have been driving Van for Roehl for 3-4 months now (on my own after all training.) And wanted to try flatbed, and if I hated it I can alway go back to Van - that was one of the reasons I went with Roehl from the beginning. This is a load that I found out later is a harder one as all the metal rods are cover in grease so they slide all over. Took 4 bulkheads, 17 straps, 2 steel tarps & 1 lumber tarp. I guess if I was going to get one from he beginning might as well be a harder one. I drove it from Chicago to Dallas. Really no shifting to much, but I felt a LOT better with all the bulkheads in place. Only hard thing was a sleet storm from St. Louis to Mt Vernin, 20-25 MPH. Now for my Christmas off time & head back out ion the 1st. I will post more on here if you guys want me to.....

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Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Matt H.'s Comment
member avatar

I haven't heard the term "bulkhead" used with regard to securing flatbed loads. I'm assuming it's something in between the separate piles so they can't shift front to back?

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Matt H.'s Comment
member avatar

I see now. The stacks of dunnage chained down in between. I've never noticed anything like that before. I haul dry van. Also for Roehl. In my previous career as an Ironworker I unloaded many trailers of structural steel, rebar, precast, etc. I might try flatbed with Roehl someday.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Very nicely done. I'm sure they told you that there's no such thing as being too secure and you did a great job with the choker/ belly wrap/ gut wrap / whatever term they taught you lol. Having those on there keeps the bundle nice and snug which relieves some of the fear of pieces sliding or walking out. Your front bulkhead is ideal and the other two are good although I think you'll find with experience that they really aren't needed. The key though is that you do what you're comfortable with because that's all that matters but we also have to juggle time. You did an excellent job and it looks very professional, keep up the good work. If the customer allows chains, they work better as chokers than straps will in many cases and won't loosen up.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Robert J.'s Comment
member avatar

Properly securing loads like that looks like it would be a lot of fun. I'm just an outside observer as I'm not yet a trucker, so I may be wrong, but flatbedding seems to be more challenging (and fun) than driving a dry van.

It looks like you're getting a nice workout as well. Good luck with your career.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Tracy H.'s Comment
member avatar

Matt

That is the nice thing at Roehl - if you try it & do not like it - just go back to Van......

I see now. The stacks of dunnage chained down in between. I've never noticed anything like that before. I haul dry van. Also for Roehl. In my previous career as an Ironworker I unloaded many trailers of structural steel, rebar, precast, etc. I might try flatbed with Roehl someday.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey welcome to the flatbed side. It's really not too bad once you "get it". I wouldn't really say these loads are hard, but definitely dangerous for a 1st load. I noticed they loaded you terribly but not much you can do sometimes. They tell us not to have any gaps between the bundles so you'd only need one or two bulkheads. Also, I was wondering why you needed a lumber tarp? We're your 2 steel tarps not long enough?

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Tracy H.'s Comment
member avatar

You got it about the tarp - I was about 10 feet short with the 2 steel's & 2 feet short with the lumber & one steel tarp...

Hey welcome to the flatbed side. It's really not too bad once you "get it". I wouldn't really say these loads are hard, but definitely dangerous for a 1st load. I noticed they loaded you terribly but not much you can do sometimes. They tell us not to have any gaps between the bundles so you'd only need one or two bulkheads. Also, I was wondering why you needed a lumber tarp? We're your 2 steel tarps not long enough?

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

You don't have any canvas or half tarps I'm assuming? I don't know the size of your tarps but our lumber tarps are 8ft drops. That would be a nightmare for such a low profile load.

Tracy H.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes LOTS of tucking was done for that. Really didn't like that part but...... Did that one forst so the steel tarps went quick... :)

You don't have any canvas or half tarps I'm assuming? I don't know the size of your tarps but our lumber tarps are 8ft drops. That would be a nightmare for such a low profile load.

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