What Should I Do If A Company Does Not Pay?

Topic 21535 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Here is what I would do. Assuming you're on paper logs and they are still paying for fuel. I would secure my next job, deliver my current load and let your dispatch know I'm heading straight to their HQ. Once there, I would do like Rainy said and document that I am satisfactorily delivering all of their equipment to them. I would also have prepared a letter of resignation effective upon receipt of delivering their equipment to them. Also, state in your resignation letter how much money they owe you and they can either pay that to you in cash right then or they can send you a check. Just think it through and make the best decision for you.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Like Scott writes, if you're quitting you don't need no stinking dispatch, just head for a terminal , document your truck and hand them the keys.

The other shoe to drop is to take your logs and documented work done, plus maybe the last paycheck stub you got to the state Labor Board. They should investigate any charge that the company is withholding all your pay. (No, it's not like in TV where the problem is fixed in a few days, it might take months.)

When small companies get strapped for cash, someone will lose, and often, amazingly, it's the employees.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Michael C.'s Comment
member avatar

Small company less than ten trucks. Not paying your check. Who is paying for the fuel? The fuel card still works? Who is dispatching you? Drive to the Yard and see them in person. Be respectful. Dont say things you might regret.

Fuel card still work. Dispatcher calls me for the loads. When I ask about my money, dispatcher tell me to talk to the owner. I ask to get a load to their location so I can drop the truck off. Basically the dispatcher will tell I already booked you for this load. If you don't take it, you just abandon a load

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Michael C.'s Comment
member avatar

But DO NOT abandon the truck just anywhere. THAT can destroy your DAC. Be sure to drop it where they tell you. get it in writing that you dropped it. it would be best to drive it to their terminal , get a receipt then get a ticket from another company for the bus. record a video with your phone that you dropped it and the condition of the truck.

you say they are not responding, yet you are driving 650 miles per day. how? how are they dispatching you?

Put a message in yhe QC stating you need an emergency response to your message or that you are headed into the terminal.

thats what i would do. take it to them, record it as proof, and record the truck condition so they cant try to bill you for damages

The dispatcher call me for the loads to be picked and where to go. Basically get the threats if I don't take this load I'm abandoning a load because they already got me down to pick it up

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Michael C.'s Comment
member avatar

Small company less than ten trucks. Not paying your check. Who is paying for the fuel? The fuel card still works? Who is dispatching you? Drive to the Yard and see them in person. Be respectful. Dont say things you might regret.

Fuel card for the fuel, dispatcher send me the load. When I tell them I'm bring their truck back. Dispatcher tells me I already put you in for this load. If you don't pick up the load and deliver. You just abandon a load

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I don't think there's much else we can tell you, unfortunately. This is not an uncommon occurrence with small companies. They wind up financially strapped and they start doing desperate things.

I would just land a new job and get out of the situation with as little stress as possible. I don't think you're going to get paid no matter what you do at this point. Either just drive the truck back to the terminal empty or pick up the load and bring it back to the terminal. Either way it doesn't really matter. Just make sure you return the truck, take pictures of it at the terminal so they can't dispute the fact that you've returned it, and move onto a new job.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Small company less than ten trucks. Not paying your check. Who is paying for the fuel? The fuel card still works? Who is dispatching you? Drive to the Yard and see them in person. Be respectful. Dont say things you might regret.

double-quotes-end.png

Fuel card for the fuel, dispatcher send me the load. When I tell them I'm bring their truck back. Dispatcher tells me I already put you in for this load. If you don't pick up the load and deliver. You just abandon a load

So, like I said before, deliver the load you have then head straight for HQ. Don't talk to dispatch. Document everything. Get receipts for everything. Document with videos on your phone. Make a video journal. Contact your states department of labor. DO NOT ABANDON TRUCK. Good luck.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

Agree with Rainy & Big Scott. When you drop your next load, head to the terminal.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

I only read a few of the responses here. I have been in your shoes before. I worked for a small company over 20 years ago. It was owned by an inlaw of mine and his partner. They also had three trucks. When he could not afford to pay me I quit and let it slide one week the next week I contacted wage and hour in that state and was told they would have to pay me within 14 days by law. On the 15th day I was still not paid so I called up the local teamsters union. Turns out I went to school with the guy that answered the phone. I told him my situation and he told me to talk to the other drivers about turning the company union. In the mean time he sent a couple drivers over to the lot the next day that miraculously broke down (Broken air hose) right in front of the exit of the lot the trucks were parked in. While this was going on I was talking to the drivers when the cops arrived and realized what was really happening. The drivers told the cop a tow truck was on the way from his company. A company union rep arrived later and simply gave him a new air line. Which they hooked up and the truck driver cleared the driveway. Then the union rep proceeded to talk to the other drivers to try and sign them up with the union. They were not interested in joining the union but they also were not interested in working for a man that could not be counted on to pay them so they quit.

Im not sure if that would work or not today but I could not resist sharing it with you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert J.'s Comment
member avatar

I have never worked for a large company in my life that had problems paying its employees.

In my experience, that is only an issue with small companies.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More