California Based Companies Or Companies That Have Terminals In California?

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James H.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey! Im obviously brand new here and i don't have much forum experience so please forgive any mistakes. Im here for advise and guidence and i want to say thank you in advance to all the professionals that take the time to sit down to read and reply with positve answers. I received my CDL last month, I went through a CDL school and i had a blast the whole 4 weeks of class and passed my exams with no problems! I have been planning this for months so i saved enough cash to pay for school as well as pay the rent and child support while i took time from my current job to attend CDL school so i guess what im trying to say is i take this pretty seriously. During my 4 weeks of school a few recruiters as well as drivers speaking on behalf of their company would drop by the class to talk to the students. these all seemed like fairly good companies but not exactly what im looking for. I don't have a long list of demands i only have a few request and none of these are really deal breakers.

I was wondering if any one could give me the name of any California based companies or companies that have terminals in California? I have read that a lot of companies are pulling out of California and i don't blame them but i want to maybe one day relocate back to California. As of right now im based in Mobile Alabama and i have a AL CDL. Im looking to drive OTR im mostly interested in flat bed so i have had TMC in my sights for months. I have read mostly good about them and i like their equipment but they are based out of Iowa .

Most of the recruiters promised more home time and some promised every weekend off. Im currently a Chief Engineer and i have been going to sea for 18 years now and i usually work a minimum of 4 weeks out. My daughter is getting older now and she has adjusted to me being gone long periods of time. She understands its my job So i would like to work for a company that lets me work as much as possible. I figured the more i drive the quicker i learn.

I didn't realize this until i started getting serious and really started looking into trucking but there seems to be a lot of companies going to automatic transmissions? Im sure the work great but i tested in a 10 speed and i would like to stay on a manual transmission if possible .

another thing that turned me off to some big companies is the team driving thing. I know the money is better but i would much rather drive solo. Maybe after i get confident enough i will be willing to have a student now and then but i don't think im cut out for team driving.

These are just a few of the questions i have. As i said before im a recent CDL school graduate and that makes me less then a rookie and i also understand that as a newbie i will have a fair amount of dues to pay before im able to find that perfect company. Im mostly interested in flat bed because i was thinking it would maybe help me someday get into the heavy haul or oversize cargo trucking? I grew up around heavy equipment and trucks and spent many weekends as a kid riding in the passenger seat of a 359 day cab with my dad but i have never driven professionally . Thanks to anyone who reads this and is able to point me in the right direction.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Hey! Im obviously brand new here and i don't have much forum experience so please forgive any mistakes. Im here for advise and guidence and i want to say thank you in advance to all the professionals that take the time to sit down to read and reply with positve answers. I received my CDL last month, I went through a CDL school and i had a blast the whole 4 weeks of class and passed my exams with no problems! I have been planning this for months so i saved enough cash to pay for school as well as pay the rent and child support while i took time from my current job to attend CDL school so i guess what im trying to say is i take this pretty seriously. During my 4 weeks of school a few recruiters as well as drivers speaking on behalf of their company would drop by the class to talk to the students. these all seemed like fairly good companies but not exactly what im looking for. I don't have a long list of demands i only have a few request and none of these are really deal breakers.

I was wondering if any one could give me the name of any California based companies or companies that have terminals in California? I have read that a lot of companies are pulling out of California and i don't blame them but i want to maybe one day relocate back to California. As of right now im based in Mobile Alabama and i have a AL CDL. Im looking to drive OTR im mostly interested in flat bed so i have had TMC in my sights for months. I have read mostly good about them and i like their equipment but they are based out of Iowa .

Most of the recruiters promised more home time and some promised every weekend off. Im currently a Chief Engineer and i have been going to sea for 18 years now and i usually work a minimum of 4 weeks out. My daughter is getting older now and she has adjusted to me being gone long periods of time. She understands its my job So i would like to work for a company that lets me work as much as possible. I figured the more i drive the quicker i learn.

I didn't realize this until i started getting serious and really started looking into trucking but there seems to be a lot of companies going to automatic transmissions? Im sure the work great but i tested in a 10 speed and i would like to stay on a manual transmission if possible .

another thing that turned me off to some big companies is the team driving thing. I know the money is better but i would much rather drive solo. Maybe after i get confident enough i will be willing to have a student now and then but i don't think im cut out for team driving.

These are just a few of the questions i have. As i said before im a recent CDL school graduate and that makes me less then a rookie and i also understand that as a newbie i will have a fair amount of dues to pay before im able to find that perfect company. Im mostly interested in flat bed because i was thinking it would maybe help me someday get into the heavy haul or oversize cargo trucking? I grew up around heavy equipment and trucks and spent many weekends as a kid riding in the passenger seat of a 359 day cab with my dad but i have never driven professionally . Thanks to anyone who reads this and is able to point me in the right direction.

Swift does Flatbed and has a terminal in Fontana, CA.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hey! Im obviously brand new here and i don't have much forum experience so please forgive any mistakes. Im here for advise and guidence and i want to say thank you in advance to all the professionals that take the time to sit down to read and reply with positve answers. I received my CDL last month, I went through a CDL school and i had a blast the whole 4 weeks of class and passed my exams with no problems! I have been planning this for months so i saved enough cash to pay for school as well as pay the rent and child support while i took time from my current job to attend CDL school so i guess what im trying to say is i take this pretty seriously. During my 4 weeks of school a few recruiters as well as drivers speaking on behalf of their company would drop by the class to talk to the students. these all seemed like fairly good companies but not exactly what im looking for. I don't have a long list of demands i only have a few request and none of these are really deal breakers.

I was wondering if any one could give me the name of any California based companies or companies that have terminals in California? I have read that a lot of companies are pulling out of California and i don't blame them but i want to maybe one day relocate back to California. As of right now im based in Mobile Alabama and i have a AL CDL. Im looking to drive OTR im mostly interested in flat bed so i have had TMC in my sights for months. I have read mostly good about them and i like their equipment but they are based out of Iowa .

Most of the recruiters promised more home time and some promised every weekend off. Im currently a Chief Engineer and i have been going to sea for 18 years now and i usually work a minimum of 4 weeks out. My daughter is getting older now and she has adjusted to me being gone long periods of time. She understands its my job So i would like to work for a company that lets me work as much as possible. I figured the more i drive the quicker i learn.

I didn't realize this until i started getting serious and really started looking into trucking but there seems to be a lot of companies going to automatic transmissions? Im sure the work great but i tested in a 10 speed and i would like to stay on a manual transmission if possible .

another thing that turned me off to some big companies is the team driving thing. I know the money is better but i would much rather drive solo. Maybe after i get confident enough i will be willing to have a student now and then but i don't think im cut out for team driving.

These are just a few of the questions i have. As i said before im a recent CDL school graduate and that makes me less then a rookie and i also understand that as a newbie i will have a fair amount of dues to pay before im able to find that perfect company. Im mostly interested in flat bed because i was thinking it would maybe help me someday get into the heavy haul or oversize cargo trucking? I grew up around heavy equipment and trucks and spent many weekends as a kid riding in the passenger seat of a 359 day cab with my dad but i have never driven professionally . Thanks to anyone who reads this and is able to point me in the right direction.

double-quotes-end.png

Swift does Flatbed and has a terminal in Fontana, CA.

Fontana, Jurupa Valley, San Diego, Lathrop, Willows, drop yard in Calexico, Rail yard in Stockton and Montabello, and various dedicated accounts throughout the state.

You only have to team when with a trainer. Other than that swift doesn't force teams. I also believe swift has a dedicated glass account of the west coast, not sure if it's still around being that i haven't seen those flatbeds in a while.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello James, and welcome to our forum!

First off I think you'd really enjoy what you learn by reading as much as you can in these two links:

  • Truck Driver's Career Guide
  • Brett's Book: The Raw Truth About Trucking (free online version)

    Secondly because of the transient nature of this job, you don't need to live near a terminal. In the last five years I've worked for two companies, both of which had my home terminal four or five states away from my home in Texas. Proximity to a terminal is neither a priority or a game changer. As long as you reside in a company's hiring area, you should be in good shape. What constitutes their hiring area is simply the fact that they handle freight in that area. Most of them show a map of their hiring area on their web sites.

    Also this statement of yours sort of stood out to me...

    i also understand that as a newbie i will have a fair amount of dues to pay before im able to find that perfect company.

    We absolutely don't fall into this modern day trap of thinking there's a few magical companies out there that we will one day discover after several years of being mistreated by the "mega starter companies." Most of us in here work for the large carriers. They are some of the most successfully managed trucking companies in the country. We make great money and are treated exceptionally well. Don't let the miscreant online whiners and complainers drag you down into their imaginary world of bondage and slavery. It's all a bunch foolishness and lies from people who will never figure out how to succeed at this career.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Hello James, and welcome to our forum!

First off I think you'd really enjoy what you learn by reading as much as you can in these two links:

  • Truck Driver's Career Guide
  • Brett's Book: The Raw Truth About Trucking (free online version)

    Secondly because of the transient nature of this job, you don't need to live near a terminal. In the last five years I've worked for two companies, both of which had my home terminal four or five states away from my home in Texas. Proximity to a terminal is neither a priority or a game changer. As long as you reside in a company's hiring area, you should be in good shape. What constitutes their hiring area is simply the fact that they handle freight in that area. Most of them show a map of their hiring area on their web sites.

    Also this statement of yours sort of stood out to me...

    double-quotes-start.png

    i also understand that as a newbie i will have a fair amount of dues to pay before im able to find that perfect company.

    double-quotes-end.png

    We absolutely don't fall into this modern day trap of thinking there's a few magical companies out there that we will one day discover after several years of being mistreated by the "mega starter companies." Most of us in here work for the large carriers. They are some of the most successfully managed trucking companies in the country. We make great money and are treated exceptionally well. Don't let the miscreant online whiners and complainers drag you down into their imaginary world of bondage and slavery. It's all a bunch foolishness and lies from people who will never figure out how to succeed at this career.

Hey, OS, how are you enjoyin your vacation? I bet it was much needed on your part.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Haha, I'm back at work now!

But I did enjoy it.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Haha, I'm back at work now!

But I did enjoy it.

Have you seen my last 2 posts on here?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Yes sir, I'm very proud of you and hope you do well in your new capacity as a trainer.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Yes sir, I'm very proud of you and hope you do well in your new capacity as a trainer.

Thanks so much. Hopefully I will get to meet ya out there on the road someday. Every time I see a Gray SAPA Volvo pullin a flatbed, I always think its you. If we ever do meet, I will sure buy ya lunch when we do meet up.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Welcome James, Roehl Transport has a Fontana Ca terminal. A buddy of mine runs curtainside and from what he says they have a pretty good flatbed freight base out there. I'm originally from the Central Valley Fresno area and every time I go out for a visit I see their flatbeds up and down I-5.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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