Tax Credit For Hire/Training Exchange: Incentives For New Driver Bringing A Check To The Party?

Topic 21874 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
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Snapshot of your future situation: - Still an Honorably discharged Vet (Army) - Unemployed (> 6 months)

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***Seeking trucking company sponsorship through CVTA or NAPFTDS certified school.

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Now, I know there are plenty of companies out there offering tuition reimbursement for schooling. I don't have the cash and the credit financing terms out there for non title IV school funding is just ri****ulous so neither are a consideration for me.

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This "sponsorship" you seek is called going to school based on the company you will work for, for an allotted period of time to repay it out of your paychecks. If this isn't something you are interested in, then you should find a different career field. No company is going to negotiate your terms, there are too many holes in them, and to be honest it is an extremely far reach to ask for as a "newb". Lastly, the world doesn't revolve around you.

I'm just a rookie getting back into trucking, so maybe my explanation holds no value or validity, but I do know through common sense that this is audacious, to say the least.

Good luck to you.

Dilly-Dilly

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Ahhh, Victor is more than a Free Agent, he is even bringing a check to the party!

I can only assume he is asking us to help him find a company that would be interested in this "wonderful opportunity" because he simply can't understand why he hasn't found them yet.

Earth to Victor... Trucking companies are not looking for a tax break when they look for drivers. They already know how to run their business and capitalize on tax incentives. What they need badly is productive professional drivers who understand how to make things happen in an extremely competitive environment.

So far your laundry list of things you seem to think you are bringing to the table is devoid of anything that qualifies you as having anything of value to offer them. That's a really bad position to start a negotiation from.

Keep us posted on those negotiations, we would love to know how that works out for ya!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Well, I had a long response to this and it got lost before I could post it. Here's the deal. When I was eligible for WOTC, it did nothing to help me get a job. That was when the economy was in the toilet and they didn't care then. Yes there is a driver shortage and freight rates are high. I don't see the companies jumping to raise driver pay or perks. You have nothing to offer a company to start any kind of negotiations. If you want to drive a truck and not pay for your training then tou must go with Paid CDL Training Programs. There are other companies who will train you. I was trained by and work for CFI. With them, after training you are required to drive for them for one year. During that time your CPM will go from 33 to 35 to 37 to 41. These jumps will be at mileage itervals. After training you are at 33, at 60,000 miles you go to 35 at 90,000 miles you go to 37 and at 120,000 miles you are at 41. That usually takes a year. CFI reimburses for you permit, endorsements, and HazMat background check. Other that that you will not have to pay anything for training. Just work for one year. CFI is inveting $4000.00 into you for training. They are not going to negotiate your pay. In this industry you must start at the bottom and move up by proving you are a responsible driver. That means, you make your pickups and deliveries early or on time. You communicate any problems or issues and don't get tickets or have accident.

To learn about training, read our training diaries section. To find out about how to do this job, read through rhis general section. Let me repeat, no company will negotiate with you. They may take the tax credit, but you'll never know.

Can one get a CDL without school? sure. However, just about every OTR company requires a certificate that you had at least 160 hours of training. Yes, you could find a small, local company to hire and train you. In certain areas there are dock to driver opportunities. In rural ares there are farms that may train you. There are many ways to get a CDL. However, for what most people need, pay, benefits and job security, those jobs usually require at least one year of OTR driving. Just look at different company's web sites and job requirements. Good luck to you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

Yes I think the military will be willing to negotiate a deal with you. Please give them a call.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I thought about this topic all day today. Well, actually about 14 seconds, and I came to the conclusion that Victor should start his very own trucking company! Fill it with likeminded "professionals".good-luck.gif

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett, can you pretty please with sugar on top get us our popcorn emoji.

::turning on the popcorn maker and heating the oil::

Anybody else want some?

Reyn R.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett, can you pretty please with sugar on top get us our popcorn emoji.

::turning on the popcorn maker and heating the oil::

Anybody else want some?

I would definitely pull up a couch & help you with that popcorn but Victor is MIA. It’s thoroughly more entertaining when “they” keep digging a deeper hole than the crater they start with.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Kinda like a terminator movie.

He'll be back, lol

Reyn R.'s Comment
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Kinda like a terminator movie.

He'll be back, lol

Let me get my recliner then! rofl-2.gifrofl-1.gifrofl-3.gif

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I just want a big can of Troll Spray!

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