US Xpress Home Daily Account In Auburn Indiana (feedback Requested)

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Jim C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi guys, I'm a first time poster and long time reader. I'm making a career change (I'm 35 and have a family). I'm nearly set to go to US Xpress' sponsored school in St. Louis and then to their dedicated Wal-Mart home daily account in Auburn Indiana.

The recruiter promised it's home daily and 2 days off per week, and that it pays around $65k per year to start. The problem is (and what has me feeling uncomfortable) is when I research reviews of this location is sounds like there is quite a gap between the recruiter's info and what I'm reading.

Some drivers are reporting making WAY less money, being off only one day per week, and having very little family time. The whole point of me considering taking this opportunity is to give me family time (vs going OTR). I'm also looking to move my family from TX to IN for this opportunity, so it's a big deal.

I'd love any feedback you guys have or have heard.

Thanks so much!

Jim

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Jim, and thanks for introducing yourself!

You stated that you are a long time reader - that's good! I know that you have seen how we ALWAYS stress that the best way to make a good start at this career is to go OTR first. There are good solid reasons why we teach that. You have your reasons for wanting to jump right into one of the toughest assignments there is, but there is no way you can do that effectively and expect to make top dollar. I don't have a lot of time here, but I want to address a couple of things that you are asking about.

The recruiter promised it's home daily and 2 days off per week, and that it pays around $65k per year to start. The problem is (and what has me feeling uncomfortable) is when I research reviews of this location is sounds like there is quite a gap between the recruiter's info and what I'm reading.

Here's the deal, and I know you have read what we teach about this trucking truth: Trucking is performance based. We teach this all the time. What a recruiter is going to be bad about doing is quoting a number to you of what some experienced drivers who start working on that account are making. It sounds good, and it isn't necessarily a falsehood. A rookie driver is going to have a really difficult time jumping right in there and earning that type of money. You have got to realize that this career is totally different from anything you've been involved with before. In most jobs they tell you what your salary is and that's what you get, or maybe they will tell you what you are going to be paid hourly, and if you happen to get some overtime you will make a little extra. In trucking there is no way that a recruiter can tell you what you are going to make. I work on a dedicated account and I earn almost twice as much than some of the other guys. I emphasized the word earn for a reason. I don't necessarily have a higher rate of pay, but I definitely am outperforming some of them.

The whole point of me considering taking this opportunity is to give me family time (vs going OTR). I'm also looking to move my family from TX to IN for this opportunity, so it's a big deal.

Surely you have seen how we also tell people all the time that these home daily jobs do not really give a person any quality home time. Truckers work long hours and are totally spent at the end of their day. Home daily jobs usually entail going home, eating, (showering if you think you have the time) and then hitting the sack so you can get up and start again very early in the morning. It is absolutely not going to be anything close to 9-5 with a lunch hour! to earn 65,000 dollars you will be working very close to 80 hours a week.

I'm not trying to crush your hopes and dreams, I'm a straight shooter, and I want you to know that this would be a very risky thing to uproot your family for. Here's what I recommend. Pursue the licensing,, through a school or a Paid CDL Training Program and commit to doing one year of OTR first. This is really where you will learn whether or not you are cut out for this work and whether you can succeed at it or not. Trust me, a lot of people find out real quick that they are in over their heads. I certainly would not do that to my family when there is a 95% failure rate of rookie drivers who are thinking they can do this job.

Please, don't go right into a job like that and uproot your family to follow you in that path. Make a sensible approach to starting this career, and hopefully you won't do any collateral damage to your family at the same time. I don't doubt you could make that job work for you, but you need to learn the business first. The best approach is to take this one step at a time, and I believe that first step needs to be gradually getting yourself accustomed to this career by going OTR for that first year. It really is the best way to accomplish what you are after.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Correct me if I'm wrong, but is this the job they've been posting? I believe they were offering 10k sign on to relocate to Indiana. If this is that job, there's got to be a reason they'd offer such a deal. Old school covered most of what you needed to know. We see lots of drivers go directly into daily gigs and run into trouble because of the nature of the local business. Not saying that it can't be done but it will be difficult.

Jim C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you, Old School. I appreciate your very well thought out reply. I'm married with three young girls, two of which we just adopted last fall. Being gone OTR for a year is something I simply cannot do. If I was single I think I'd really enjoy it, but I'm simply not in a position to do that.

For that reason, I've been studying all the home daily options. I hear what you're saying about what "home daily" really is, and it does appear that not all that glitters is gold!

Another option is I pay the $5k out of pocket (which I can do) and go to my local CDL school in Killeen, TX. It's 4 weeks and is a certified school. That would open some doors, I'm sure, but in my area there are not a lot of home daily choices. But, it would at least put me one notch above the student population.

What are your thoughts on running LTL with XPO? I see they have many jobs available and it would appear that I'd qualify upon graduating from school.

Love to hear your thoughts on that, Old School, as well as general advice. If you were in my shoes and had to have local to start, what would you do? And, as I mentioned before, we are willing to relocate for the right opportunity.

Thanks, sir!

Jim

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob's Comment
member avatar

No offense, but I think your crazy to relocate for your first trucking job, when you haven't even started yet. I don't know the exact figure, but the amount of rookies who don't make it the first year is astronomical. Many fail, or give up shortly after training. Old school truly does know best. Starting OTR is the best move career wise. I understand your worry about being gone all the time, but it's only one year. So many more doors will open up for you . Dedicated and local positions require a lot more skill and patience. I started locally, and I can honestly say that I feel it is pure LUCK I have not hit anything. I've had numerous close calls....typically (not always) local companies have a lot more interested drivers waiting for their chance to get on so (in my opinion) are a lot less likely to be as forgiving when it comes to accidents/incidents. If you take that position and get into a couple minor incidents, which isn't all too uncommon, how are you going to find another position that will take you on being a rookie with limited experience but numerous accidents.

OTR isn't ideal for most families but it really will set you up for a lot better opportunities in the future.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Jim, adding to what Old School, CT and Rob provided;...

0142701001518483411.jpg

...although I am Walmart Dedicated through Swift; the DC operation and process is virtually the same for all of Walmart's Transportation Partners delivering grocery (search on my name an Walmart, lots of info). We have a couple of drivers on the forum who either currently run Wally Store Loads or have in the past.

I was OTR for over 3 months before I committed to the Walmart account. Even with that under my belt, the transition was a significant challenge, a different mindset requiring constant hustle and lots of close quarter maneuvering. It took me the better part of 6 months before I began to perform at a proficient level.

The 65k number is not consistent with rookie level expectations, and will definitely require 6 days per week, averaging no less than 12 hour days. You will make a ton of mistakes in the first few months significantly reducing compensation potential.

You'll want to understand how their Walmart drivers are paid; CPM , dispatch pay and stop pay. What performance and safety incentives are in place? What is the weekly mileage expectations and average stops per load. 65k annual compensation quotation does not accurately express how you will be paid for your first year.

Ask if and/or how you will trained on the account. That's more important than pay. If you are Road-trained on the account for 4-5 weeks, it might work for you.

Tough gig for an entry-level driver.

0469053001518483717.jpg

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I am going to throw my 2 cents into the arena. As others already alluded to, the home daily is absolutely grueling!!! Long hours, tight quarters, impatient and ignorant 4-wheelers, etc... starting out local as a rookie is playing Russian roulette with a semi automatic pistol and fully loaded clip. Pray for a misfire.

TBH, your BEST option to start with the most hometime is a regional account. Even a dedicated Regional would work. Just understand that your 'weekend' is going to be between 34 hrs and 60 hrs. More than likely averaging closer to the 40hr mark. Understand that income potential in a regional gig is theoretically close to OTR. Like a local gig it will all be about hustle and maximizing every single day out, leaving nothing on the table. Your first year will be grossing somewhere between 35k and 50k. Dependent how quickly you figure it all out.

Honestly, Regional would be your best chance at success with good hometime.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jason K.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry to hitch off of his post here, but I have no real advice other than what everyone else is saying. Matches what I have researched.

...although I am Walmart Dedicated through Swift;

G-town can you email me if you don't mind regarding Swift I'd like to ask you a few questions.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jason requests:

G-town can you email me if you don't mind regarding Swift I'd like to ask you a few questions. ----------------

Jason not trying to be evasive, but perhaps your questions are relevant to others seeking similar answers. We try to keep it open on the forum. Hope you understand.

What can I help you with?

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Jim, I have no idea about US Xpress's "home daily", but I have experience in that type of assignment as Swift. Mine was certainly not a Walmart business, but "in-house" for Swift, a Shuttle route. Much like LTL Line driving.

I drove daily from Memphis to a truck stop near St Louis, swapped trailers with a driver coming from Kansas City, and returned. A 512 mile round trip. Paid by the mile.

Now about the "home daily" part. I was gone from home about 12 hours, including the 10-11hours for the daily trip. Along with some sleep time, I had about 3 "usable" hours per day. Yes, home daily, but four days out of six, I was more or less useless at home or for anything else. Four on, two off, so I got more "weekends" than the average person. But I was very limited in what I could do for four days.

There is also a "weekends off" which basically means you do a 34 hour break at home. Example: get off your truck Saturday afternoon, be at work early Monday morning. I also had experience in a weekends off, but mine was more an actual weekend. (A different policy than the one I just described.)

My point is, for your own benefit, do not take "home daily" without getting a more accurate description from the recruiter.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
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