A Duie Pyle

Topic 22279 | Page 1

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CT Trucker 's Comment
member avatar

Good Evening everyone,

So took everyones advice and staying a company driver, recently had a interview with A. Duie Pyle seems like a very good company and very excited to get started. Would love any input on this company if anyone knows by word of mouth or worked here.

Now I have to make a tough decision to do P&D or Linehaul , did some reseach on both but wouldnt mind some feed back from the group.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Good Evening everyone,

So took everyones advice and staying a company driver, recently had a interview with A. Duie Pyle seems like a very good company and very excited to get started. Would love any input on this company if anyone knows by word of mouth or worked here.

Now I have to make a tough decision to do P&D or Linehaul , did some reseach on both but wouldnt mind some feed back from the group.

Been around for a long time, have grown consistently and steadily every year. They have the MAB paint contract in Philly, also Wegmans contract.

Unless your backing and close quarter maneuvering skills are top-notch, I'd steer clear of P&D.

Good luck.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I'd never even heard of A Duie Pyle until now, but I run linehaul for Old Dominion personally I prefer linehaul over P&D as generally we make more than the P&D drivers and we dont have to worry about finding and backing into different customers which are usually in city/ suburban areas. But running to the same locations as Line Haul does can get boring for some but personally I prefer routine and repetition.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

I'd never even heard of A Duie Pyle until now, but I run linehaul for Old Dominion personally I prefer linehaul over P&D as generally we make more than the P&D drivers and we dont have to worry about finding and backing into different customers which are usually in city/ suburban areas. But running to the same locations as Line Haul does can get boring for some but personally I prefer routine and repetition.

I see their trucks quite a bit, mainly in the northeast which is where I spend the majority of my time. I do notice they seem to run a lot of Hazmat. Well the ones I have paid attention to do anyway.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Icecold24k wrote:

I see their trucks quite a bit, mainly in the northeast which is where I spend the majority of my time. I do notice they seem to run a lot of Hazmat. Well the ones I have paid attention to do anyway.

Makes sense; they are based in West Chester PA, a western suburb of Philly.

The Hazmat placards are for their paint contracts with MAB. You'll also notice body heaters on many of their dry vans to keep it above freezing for the paint.

Good outfit.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

Icecold24k wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

I see their trucks quite a bit, mainly in the northeast which is where I spend the majority of my time. I do notice they seem to run a lot of Hazmat. Well the ones I have paid attention to do anyway.

double-quotes-end.png

Makes sense; they are based in West Chester PA, a western suburb of Philly.

The Hazmat placards are for their paint contracts with MAB. You'll also notice body heaters on many of their dry vans to keep it above freezing for the paint.

Good outfit.

Ahh yes that would make sense. Good info!

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I see a lot of their trucks in the northeast, also, whenever I'm north on 81 or 95.

CT Trucker 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys for all the feed back. They seem like a great company from what I see, I recently talk to a few drivers and they love this place and a lot of old timers been there for 10+ years. I am heading to West Chester PA Monday for orientation so ill make sure I post the details so everyone has the info.

Its been a while since I have backed up a trailer 1 year 6 months to be accurate but just need some practice and ill be fine, during my driving test with them had to alley dock and got it in there in 2 shots hahaha. Need to practice my shifting going from a 8 speed back to a 10. I will keep you all up to date.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Cool..i live just across the river in the west deptford area. please keep us posted thnx kirs

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Interested to hear how you like driving a Mack. They have a lot of them...might end up with one.

Good luck!

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