McElroy Truck Lines

Topic 2878 | Page 10

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Frank R.'s Comment
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Parrothead66, So how was Cuba?

Parrothead66's Comment
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Cuba was fine...Everybody was helpful, serious about the job as should be but they also try to make it fun...Bruce Moore is your main instructor, great guy with a lot of knowledge and stories...Shawn does the simulator and CBT's (computer based training) and we had another driver trainer that was helping out named Terry Edwards, another good guy...Again they are serious about the job but also willing to poke fun and make it enjoyable...Got my first load assignment today so spending the night in Philadelphia............Mississippi not PA and head home tomorrow for weekend and deliver in Frisco TX Monday morning....when you go to Cuba if you drive your truck or they have yours there assigned already then be sure to take some cleaning supplies and you can clean the inside of your truck that week.....Road test with Bruce, you'll write directions off Qualcomm and then use them to follow your route. Basically just don't hit anything, he knows you'll prob grind some gears but just keep control of your rig and trailer. If you miss a turn he'll tell you, just don't freak out, find a good turn around spot to pull in and turn around. If it's a tight right turn use a button hook. You'll do 2-3 trip plans, simple short hand with mileage and show a fuel stop. On the backing skills just take your time, get out and look...as many times as you need, pull up if you need to..looking and pulling up are free...just be in control of your trailer...The S back is kinda tight and the serpentine is 3 cones...I stopped and looked 4-5 times just to make sure my trailer was setting up right and they'd rather you do that then pull a bumper off.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Frank R.'s Comment
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Well Congrats on pass all the events at Cuba. I talk to ReformedSquid the other day at the Lowes DC and he told me the same thing that his truck was very dirty and had he had to do a lot of cleaning of the interior. So I will plan on taking some cleaning supplies with me to Cuba. That is funny how you mention that "pull ups are free" I was backing into that tight squeeze at Fletcher, OK and John told me the same thing. LOL

RedBeard's Comment
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Cuba was fine...Everybody was helpful, serious about the job as should be but they also try to make it fun...Bruce Moore is your main instructor, great guy with a lot of knowledge and stories...Shawn does the simulator and CBT's (computer based training) and we had another driver trainer that was helping out named Terry Edwards, another good guy...Again they are serious about the job but also willing to poke fun and make it enjoyable...Got my first load assignment today so spending the night in Philadelphia............Mississippi not PA and head home tomorrow for weekend and deliver in Frisco TX Monday morning....when you go to Cuba if you drive your truck or they have yours there assigned already then be sure to take some cleaning supplies and you can clean the inside of your truck that week.....Road test with Bruce, you'll write directions off Qualcomm and then use them to follow your route. Basically just don't hit anything, he knows you'll prob grind some gears but just keep control of your rig and trailer. If you miss a turn he'll tell you, just don't freak out, find a good turn around spot to pull in and turn around. If it's a tight right turn use a button hook. You'll do 2-3 trip plans, simple short hand with mileage and show a fuel stop. On the backing skills just take your time, get out and look...as many times as you need, pull up if you need to..looking and pulling up are free...just be in control of your trailer...The S back is kinda tight and the serpentine is 3 cones...I stopped and looked 4-5 times just to make sure my trailer was setting up right and they'd rather you do that then pull a bumper off.

yea bruce and shawn a great guys congrats on being solo, but about terry edwards not sure you got to know him to well cause we all call him meathead and thats what he goes by. Did you see his picture on the training wall with a mullet its the best he said he is going to grow it back out.

oh good point about the s curve that thing was tough sorry i have not been on here to tell you about it, its tough on the road mainly cause of ajusting to lifestyle when your with the trainer its kinda of like having a good cushion but being solo its hard having to find the consignee while doing your scans and setting up for those tight corners. I know its looks like i am just whining and complaing but i am trying to just telling its gets very exhausting out there. The funny thing is my instructor told me i would be but didnt believe him oh i do now so all i can say is get your rest at home and during the week.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Parrothead66's Comment
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Yes Red he does go by Meathead & the mullet photo is something else. Yeah I missed the last turn in Philadelphia to the consignee and had to make the block at the downtown square so fyi if you go there when you turn onto Range Ave go the 3/10 mile and turn left at the BLUE STORAGE BUILDINGS, there is no store there at the turn they tore it down, then just follow that to end of the road

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

SAMUEL C.'s Comment
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Welcome to the MTL family, hope to see you all on the road.

Tyler M.'s Comment
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Yes I have been working with Anita and she has taken excellent care of me. Chris was the recruiter who came by the school I went to he also was very straight forward and everything I have heard from either of them has been backed by their drivers. I was very impressed by that; especially coming from the military and knowing how recruiters are.

How do you like it at mcelroy. I'm straight out of school and just got pre hired. How many miles you average and weekly pay average would be great too

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

DISCO's Comment
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Hey y'all!! Read all pages of this and enjoyed it. I'm rounding the three month mark with "A" company and really looking at MTL. I've known my calling is flatbed and not van. I like the small company atmosphere as well. I live near Florence, SC and was hoping someone of y'all that drive for em can tell me a few things.. 1. What would my training be like since I have otr exp. But no flatbed? 2. What the dedicated and/or reg. Map look like for the SE? I wish their site was more informative but TT will always come through. Thanks again and in advance. Be safe out there!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Eric P.'s Comment
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Good morning guys just read this whole thread I loved all the input, I'm new to the trucking industry trying to get my foot in the door. I'm about to weeks away from getting my cdl so if everything goes well I should pass my driving and skills test in Chicago. Anyways, a recruiter from McElroy came to my school and I really liked the whole pitch especially because I was looking at working with Schneider but seeing how McElroy guarantees weekends at home and they start at about .10cpm more it seemed like a better way to go. My only concern is the mileage in the Illinois area those anybody know if I would be averaging good miles and to where I would be heading? Since I know the recruiter said that they're starting up big up here in the Midwest so I wanted to know what my mileage would be like if I pass all my tests and get hired on by McElroy. Thanks in advance guys

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Frank R.'s Comment
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Well guys at Cuba for my final week . Let's see how this goes?

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