Got Into An Accident Today, Do You Think This Will Be Going On My Record?

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Justin N.'s Comment
member avatar

I was in Shreveport today just entering the on ramp to i49 south. I was still speeding up when this flatbed comes along besides me and his load tips over to the right, and right into my truck and trailer. Neither of us were in each others lane or anything. It is just that there was a slight curve going left and he took it fast enough that these big old john deer pieces he was carrying tilted over far enough that the things hit me.

Problem now is he either did not notice it or he purposely just kept going. I did not get his number or even his company, he was too far ahead to see anything after I got enough sense to look. My jb hunt truck was governed at 61 mph and his was not so there was no hope to catch up with him.

There was no damage to my truck, just a big scrape on the trailer, nothing too serious. I called my company's safety department and they had me file a police report for the hit and run. I have another load tomorrow so I am still employed and all but was not told how this will be classified. Even if it is considered as a non preventable accident I still do not even want that to go on my record.

Anyone have an experience like that? How did it end up?

Chief's Comment
member avatar

I was in Shreveport today just entering the on ramp to i49 south. I was still speeding up when this flatbed comes along besides me and his load tips over to the right, and right into my truck and trailer. Neither of us were in each others lane or anything. It is just that there was a slight curve going left and he took it fast enough that these big old john deer pieces he was carrying tilted over far enough that the things hit me.

Problem now is he either did not notice it or he purposely just kept going. I did not get his number or even his company, he was too far ahead to see anything after I got enough sense to look. My jb hunt truck was governed at 61 mph and his was not so there was no hope to catch up with him.

There was no damage to my truck, just a big scrape on the trailer, nothing too serious. I called my company's safety department and they had me file a police report for the hit and run. I have another load tomorrow so I am still employed and all but was not told how this will be classified. Even if it is considered as a non preventable accident I still do not even want that to go on my record.

Anyone have an experience like that? How did it end up?

Based on what you've stated it is not a DOT reportable event and as long as you weren't issued a citation it should not show on either your MVR or your CSA score. How JB Hunt decides to classify it in their files and on your DAC is anyone's best guess.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

I can speak a bit about this. While I was driving for JB Hunt I had a driver take out my passenger side mirror while parked and I was in the truck stop. Since there was nothing I could have done I reported it and heard nothing else about it.

As you should have seen by now you know that JB Hunt works on their trailers all the time so it should not be an issue.

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

It might go on your DAC , but since it was NOT your fault, it should be listed as a NONPREVENTABLE accident, if they do list it.

Dave

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I got in my first accident. In the receivers yard. My trailer scraped the corner of a dropped trailer. The receiver said it was between my company and the trailers company. It was a non roadway accident with only the two companies involved no dot involved. Does this go on my cdl or is this just on my company record?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rick S wants to know:...

I got in my first accident. In the receivers yard. My trailer scraped the corner of a dropped trailer. The receiver said it was between my company and the trailers company. It was a non roadway accident with only the two companies involved no dot involved. Does this go on my cdl or is this just on my company record?

A non-reportable accident, if preventable which this definitely is, may be reported to your DAC by your company. I suggest asking them how they intend to report it.

G.O.A.L. once, twice as many times as it takes. Ounce of prevention,...etc., etc.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

It will appear on your MVR as a not at fault accident since a police report was file and it will also show on your companies insurance even if they repaired it their self. All the companies that do their own repairs still have to report the accidents to their insurance carriers.

I was in Shreveport today just entering the on ramp to i49 south. I was still speeding up when this flatbed comes along besides me and his load tips over to the right, and right into my truck and trailer. Neither of us were in each others lane or anything. It is just that there was a slight curve going left and he took it fast enough that these big old john deer pieces he was carrying tilted over far enough that the things hit me.

Problem now is he either did not notice it or he purposely just kept going. I did not get his number or even his company, he was too far ahead to see anything after I got enough sense to look. My jb hunt truck was governed at 61 mph and his was not so there was no hope to catch up with him.

There was no damage to my truck, just a big scrape on the trailer, nothing too serious. I called my company's safety department and they had me file a police report for the hit and run. I have another load tomorrow so I am still employed and all but was not told how this will be classified. Even if it is considered as a non preventable accident I still do not even want that to go on my record.

Anyone have an experience like that? How did it end up?

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

It will appear on your MVR as a not at fault accident since a police report was file and it will also show on your companies insurance even if they repaired it their self. All the companies that do their own repairs still have to report the accidents to their insurance carriers.

double-quotes-start.png

I was in Shreveport today just entering the on ramp to i49 south. I was still speeding up when this flatbed comes along besides me and his load tips over to the right, and right into my truck and trailer. Neither of us were in each others lane or anything. It is just that there was a slight curve going left and he took it fast enough that these big old john deer pieces he was carrying tilted over far enough that the things hit me.

Problem now is he either did not notice it or he purposely just kept going. I did not get his number or even his company, he was too far ahead to see anything after I got enough sense to look. My jb hunt truck was governed at 61 mph and his was not so there was no hope to catch up with him.

There was no damage to my truck, just a big scrape on the trailer, nothing too serious. I called my company's safety department and they had me file a police report for the hit and run. I have another load tomorrow so I am still employed and all but was not told how this will be classified. Even if it is considered as a non preventable accident I still do not even want that to go on my record.

Anyone have an experience like that? How did it end up?

double-quotes-end.png

So as not to confuse with the most recent post by Rick, Cornelius was responding to the original post...the one from three years ago regarding a hit and run accident.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

It will go on your company record and on it will also be reported on their insurance so might show on your record

I got in my first accident. In the receivers yard. My trailer scraped the corner of a dropped trailer. The receiver said it was between my company and the trailers company. It was a non roadway accident with only the two companies involved no dot involved. Does this go on my cdl or is this just on my company record?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Cornelius wrote this in response to Rick's post:

It will go on your company record and on it will also be reported on their insurance so might show on your record

double-quotes-start.png

I got in my first accident. In the receivers yard. My trailer scraped the corner of a dropped trailer. The receiver said it was between my company and the trailers company. It was a non roadway accident with only the two companies involved no dot involved. Does this go on my cdl or is this just on my company record?

double-quotes-end.png

Cornelius I respectfully disagree. You stated an opinion...an opinion that is purely speculative at this point.

If the damage to the trailer was considered incidental and agreed as such by both carriers involved (which we don't really know yet, but sounds like that was the case), there will BE NO REPAIR needed. So there will be nothing reported. It was a corner strike...one of the toughest parts of a trailer, and for the very reason Rick shared, it gets hit, a lot. Unless there is a puncture or slice to the side sheets (exposing the interior to the elements), or structural damage; no carrier is going to waste their shop resources or place a trailer OOS to repair a cosmetic ding, dent or scratch. Good grief Cornelius...do you say these things to scare the sh** out of newbies?

To reiterate what I already said, many times carriers WILL NOT report something incidental to a driver's MVR or make a record of it in their company driver file.

Rick,...buddy, if you are still with us, shake it off. It happens, and is expected from rookie drivers. Learn from it (G.O.A.L.), move on and try NOT to let it happen again.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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