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Got into an accident today, do you think this will be going on my record?

Topic 3254 | Page 2

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dirtrocker's Comment
member avatar

I got in my first accident. In the receivers yard. My trailer scraped the corner of a dropped trailer. The receiver said it was between my company and the trailers company. It was a non roadway accident with only the two companies involved no dot involved. Does this go on my cdl or is this just on my company record?

Did this happen today at the LOWES yard in Hagerstown MD?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

(Unrelated, sort of): Saturday in Chicago a John Deere combine removed itself from its flatbed host and lay on its side in the middle of the road; not even on a curve... scarily, it was on an overpass! I can't figure out why a John Deere combine was in the city limits of Chicago.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

I can't figure out why a John Deere combine was in the city limits of Chicago.

Just passin' thru.

Back to the original question, as G-Town said, no company is likely to fix cosmetic damage to a trailer. Take a closer look at the rubrails of some flatbeds next time you walk through a truck stop and count how many have wavy looking rails. Bonus if they have yellow paint on them.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately I process a lot of such claims G-Town.... if the 2 companies agree not to report it then everything will be ok.... if the other company wanna be nasal about it then they will report it just to get money especially the smaller companies... so I hope it was one of the big boys that was hit who will disregard it. Since I always have to request loss history from companies before I can offer them a quote I do see a lot of docks hits and trailers claims

Cornelius wrote this in response to Rick's post:

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It will go on your company record and on it will also be reported on their insurance so might show on your record

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I got in my first accident. In the receivers yard. My trailer scraped the corner of a dropped trailer. The receiver said it was between my company and the trailers company. It was a non roadway accident with only the two companies involved no dot involved. Does this go on my cdl or is this just on my company record?

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Cornelius I respectfully disagree. You stated an opinion...an opinion that is purely speculative at this point.

If the damage to the trailer was considered incidental and agreed as such by both carriers involved (which we don't really know yet, but sounds like that was the case), there will BE NO REPAIR needed. So there will be nothing reported. It was a corner strike...one of the toughest parts of a trailer, and for the very reason Rick shared, it gets hit, a lot. Unless there is a puncture or slice to the side sheets (exposing the interior to the elements), or structural damage; no carrier is going to waste their shop resources or place a trailer OOS to repair a cosmetic ding, dent or scratch. Good grief Cornelius...do you say these things to scare the sh** out of newbies?

To reiterate what I already said, many times carriers WILL NOT report something incidental to a driver's MVR or make a record of it in their company driver file.

Rick,...buddy, if you are still with us, shake it off. It happens, and is expected from rookie drivers. Learn from it (G.O.A.L.), move on and try NOT to let it happen again.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Cornelius wrote:

Unfortunately I process a lot of such claims G-Town.... if the 2 companies agree not to report it then everything will be ok.... if the other company wanna be nasal about it then they will report it just to get money especially the smaller companies...

No doubt in my mind, that's your job. Overall isn't that basically what I stated in my reply to you though?

Here is the deal. We are here to help newbies, students and rookie drivers...most of the time they do not concern themselves with their trucking company's insurance. Your reply to Rick likely elevated his already heightened level of concern and fear. He was worried about what will be reported on his DAC and/or filed in "his" company employee record and has no earthly idea or reason to consider the insurance implications. You arbitrarily tied those two things together, which not only isn't necessary, is again speculation on your part. Basically Rick's question could have been easily addressed (and was) without insurance being spun into it.

Many times interjecting insurance information is relevant, makes sense, and is appreciated, but not for Rick's post. I know you are trying to help and that's great...just try to pick your spots and try to understand and put yourself in the shoes of the driver first and foremost.

Thanks.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

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I got in my first accident. In the receivers yard. My trailer scraped the corner of a dropped trailer. The receiver said it was between my company and the trailers company. It was a non roadway accident with only the two companies involved no dot involved. Does this go on my cdl or is this just on my company record?

double-quotes-end.png

Did this happen today at the LOWES yard in Hagerstown MD?

No happened in aurora, Illinois

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

I guess that was my way of telling him that it is a common occurrence not to feel too bad about himself .

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