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Flatbed Variety

Topic 4373 | Page 13

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Robert McD.'s Comment
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I want to get into flatbed but images like this scare me a little. Ogb4nom.jpg Seems like making those kindof mistakes could get really expensive fast.

Transporting loads of cars would scare the ba-jesus out of me! rofl-3.gif

Thanks you all for posting your pictures and giving us plenty of ideas on how flatbedding actually works. I think the most aggravating part might be tarping in near zero weather, to say nothing of cargo securement.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Pat, this has been a great thread - thanks for starting it!

I got a kick out of you saying your truck was blushing when you pulled onto the scale - that's funny!

Hey Bud, love the photos, especially the beard-cicles, have had a few myself here lately. I love how the flat-beds get loaded and unloaded in record time. The other day while reefer drivers all across the country were waiting six and seven hours to get loaded, I pulled into a shipper for a load of brick pavers - my appointment was for 0600 - I roll in about five thirty in the morning, and before I could even get my brakes set the fork-lift operator was racing toward me with the first of 14 pallets. I had my load secured and ready to roll before the sun was really above the horizon. Here I am ready to roll from Hanover, Pennsylvania down into Monroe, Louisiana.

loaded strapped and tarped flatbed at sunrise

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Well today started with dropping a load of scrap..... you thought I was going to leave the S off didn't you... LOL

flatbed loaded with scrap metal

Then I dropped the trailer and picked up a beam trailer to haul this bridge beam that will deliver tomorrow.

beam trailer loaded with bridge beam

From the end of my beam trailer to the front bumper I am 94 feet long.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh and this is my first time using a steerable trailer. I have a remote in the cab that I can turn the tires on the trailer with.

gyppo logger's Comment
member avatar

Well today started with dropping a load of scrap..... you thought I was going to leave the S off didn't you... LOL

IMG_20150202_090429131.jpg

Then I dropped the trailer and picked up a beam trailer to haul this bridge beam that will deliver tomorrow.

IMG_20150202_130050082.jpg

From the end of my beam trailer to the front bumper I am 94 feet long.

Now that's driving! It's great your getting pictures of this stuff, I didn't get any of my first 10 years. That thing looks heavy, are your air lines on top of the beam?

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Well today started with dropping a load of scrap..... you thought I was going to leave the S off didn't you... LOL

IMG_20150202_090429131.jpg

Then I dropped the trailer and picked up a beam trailer to haul this bridge beam that will deliver tomorrow.

IMG_20150202_130050082.jpg

From the end of my beam trailer to the front bumper I am 94 feet long.

double-quotes-end.png

Now that's driving! It's great your getting pictures of this stuff, I didn't get any of my first 10 years. That thing looks heavy, are your air lines on top of the beam?

They are hanging from a cable along side the beam. You stretch out the cable and connect it then you use a strap and a winch to pull the cable tight by connecting it to a ring on the cable about every 10 feet or so. total weight of the beam was 62k and we were watching the crane outriggers come off the ground when he was setting them.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Pat, this has been a great thread - thanks for starting it!

I got a kick out of you saying your truck was blushing when you pulled onto the scale - that's funny!

Hey Bud, love the photos, especially the beard-cicles, have had a few myself here lately. I love how the flat-beds get loaded and unloaded in record time. The other day while reefer drivers all across the country were waiting six and seven hours to get loaded, I pulled into a shipper for a load of brick pavers - my appointment was for 0600 - I roll in about five thirty in the morning, and before I could even get my brakes set the fork-lift operator was racing toward me with the first of 14 pallets. I had my load secured and ready to roll before the sun was really above the horizon. Here I am ready to roll from Hanover, Pennsylvania down into Monroe, Louisiana.

20150129_070939_zps023881ae.jpg

Not a problem at all. We at least get to see what we are hauling... LOL

Gotta love that attention that you get. People are always happy to see us... The shippers to get the product out and the customer so they can finish their job.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

The Dude's Comment
member avatar

Old School, I noticed you crank them all to the driver's side. Was wondering if you'd shed some light as to why you prefer that rather than alternating.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Dude, I'm impressed that you noticed! Only a true flat-bedder would notice such small but important things.

I actually prefer alternating the winches, but for some strange reason all the trailers this company has ordered were ordered specifically to have all the winches on one side - the other side doesn't even have the rail on it for the winches. These guys are kind of new to the flat-bed side of the business, and there's still a few things they haven't quite figured out yet.

I agree with the idea that alternating the winches is always the best way to secure your load though.

The Dude's Comment
member avatar

Dude, I'm impressed that you noticed! Only a true flat-bedder would notice such small but important things.

I actually prefer alternating the winches, but for some strange reason all the trailers this company has ordered were ordered specifically to have all the winches on one side - the other side doesn't even have the rail on it for the winches. These guys are kind of new to the flat-bed side of the business, and there's still a few things they haven't quite figured out yet.

I agree with the idea that alternating the winches is always the best way to secure your load though.

Thanks! That means a lot to me. I've been trying to be a good flat-bed scholar.

That surprises me that your company did that. Bad advice? Do they even give you ratchet straps to alternate or do they really just want you to 100% tie down on driver's side?

I don't know if you work a local gig where you have a different trailer every day, but I might just be inclined to pop some tools out and install some of those winches on the other side of the trailer for them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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