Flatbed Variety

Topic 4373 | Page 42

Page 42 of 109 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Here's the steel load that took me 19 straps, 45 edge protectors, 4 moving pads, 3 tarps, and 3 hours to secure in the Phoenix heat. If I get a chance, I'll snap a pic of it untarped when I deliver on Monday, although really it's not that interesting - just lots of bundles of 8' and 10' steel channels.

load of steel strapped tarped and secured on flatbed trailer

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Blade was only supposed to be 12'3" wide. It turned out to be 13'6" so I had to wait 2 hours for a pilot to get there. Anything over 12'6" on 2 lane roads here require a pilot car in front. Made it to the delivery 15 minutes before sundown.

Extra-wide CAT excavator loaded and chained on flatbed trailer

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Anything over 12'6" on 2 lane roads here require a pilot car in front. Made it to the delivery 15 minutes before sundown.

Hey guys....besides the Rand McNally Motor Carriers Atlas which lists the length, height, and weight restrictions by state are there other sources of information you guys use to determine the specific laws by state for flatbed including oversize or overweight loads or any specifics related to cargo securement?

We have those two new sections in the High Road Training Program for Cargo Securement and the New York State Coil Endorsement but I'd love to add more materials if I can get my hands on some. As complicated as the various rules can get I'd like to give people the opportunity to learn as much as possible the easy way. It's a whole lot easier kicking back and learning it online whenever you like than it is learning it out in the field on-demand.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Anything over 12'6" on 2 lane roads here require a pilot car in front. Made it to the delivery 15 minutes before sundown.

double-quotes-end.png

Hey guys....besides the Rand McNally Motor Carriers Atlas which lists the length, height, and weight restrictions by state are there other sources of information you guys use to determine the specific laws by state for flatbed including oversize or overweight loads or any specifics related to cargo securement?

We have those two new sections in the High Road Training Program for Cargo Securement and the New York State Coil Endorsement but I'd love to add more materials if I can get my hands on some. As complicated as the various rules can get I'd like to give people the opportunity to learn as much as possible the easy way. It's a whole lot easier kicking back and learning it online whenever you like than it is learning it out in the field on-demand.

Brett, every state I have looked at has one of these Trucker Handbooks available online. The forum will not let me post a link to the PDF file. But if you google say truckers handbook montana you will get something like this.

https://www.mdt.mt.gov/publications/docs/manuals/truckers_handbook.pdf

There is another book that we have in the office that has all the states in it. I will have to take a look and see what it is. It even gives you the permitable weight based on axle spacings per group.

The other thing and this is the bible is your individual permits. If you deviate from what that permit states then you can get into some trouble especially if you are off route.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Picked these up yesterday and delivered this morning 500 miles away .... and I was still in the same state! 60 feet long track sections and grossing just over 91k pounds.

IMG_20150804_154548596.jpg

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

The last 2 days have been very hectic. My 1/2" chains got a workout. In 2 days I moved a JD 824 Loader, CAT 972 loader, CAT 980 loader, Komatsu 200LC Loader, 2013 KW dump truck and a grader. That was my first time in a grader and had it moving towards the trailer in less than a minute. Setting the blade on the deck was another story. Man there are a lot of levers on that thing that move the blade any direction imaginable. Now I have to go load a 350 JD excavator for delivery Monday morning. This one is a monster that requires the 8 axle trailer to move.

So this week I moved a total of 6 pieces of equipment and the RR tracks in 5 days. Spent as much time out of my truck as I did inside it. All in all, I can say that I slept good last night.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Just finished loading the John Deere 350 for Monday delivery. The machine itself weighs 77k add that to the 67k that the truck and trailer weigh and you have a gross of 144k. Not the heaviest load I have moved but it is enough to get your attention. If you notice the jeep is pulled out from under the trailer neck. This is so that it is easier to pick it all back up on Monday because it is loaded. What I will do first is pick up the jeep that connects to the 5th wheel on the truck and then back that under the neck of the trailer. because the ramp on the jeep is so long and tapered, it makes it very easy to pick up a load like this off of the ground. Had I just left the trailer connected to the jeep, I would have had to pickup all the weight at one time with the truck and those ramps are much steeper. The last time I had to pick up a trailer left like that I had to use the winch to pull the truck under the trailer. Not a fun thing at all.

Anyhow, I did remember to get a photo of the 350 on the trailer.

IMG_20150808_164114621.jpg

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett, I found something that may work for you. It is a 450+ page PDF that has every state listed. Now this is only a reference and all info should be double checked by the carrier/driver and reviewed on your permit.

http://permits.scranet.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/SCRA_PM_1012.pdf

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Slinky coils, Pueblo CO to Pompano Beach FL. These are heavier than they look, 4600 lbs. each. I was contemplating that yesterday and today when two different four wheelers cut in front of me literally less than 5 feet off my front bumper at 65 mph so they could win whatever race it is they think they're in. Yeah, they got the air horn, but that may not save them or the driver next time. Just hope they think about it and stop doing that.

flatbed trailer with metal slinky coils strapped to it in Pueblo CO en route to Pompano Beach, FL

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Brett, I found something that may work for you. It is a 450+ page PDF that has every state listed. Now this is only a reference and all info should be double checked by the carrier/driver and reviewed on your permit.

http://permits.scranet.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/SCRA_PM_1012.pdf

Excellent! Thanks! I'm gonna have a look at that.

Page 42 of 109 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Choosing A Trucking Company Flatbed Load Securement Photos
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More