Flatbed Variety

Topic 4373 | Page 74

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Pat M.'s Comment
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I've often thought I'd like to do heavy haul, but those 100' beams scare me. I agree with G-Town - my hat's off to you!

I've seen a lot of wind turbine blades going down the road lately, and those look even scarier. I mean, they're designed to catch wind, right? And they deliver them to windy areas like the plains in Colorado and Wyoming, right? What could go wrong?

It is not as bad as it seems. Most of the time you have pilot cars that can stop traffic when you need them to. You do have to bring your A+ game every time. I can't even begin to describe how nervous I was with the first beams I pulled. Now a 100' beam to me is like you pulling your 48' trailer. It just takes more room to turn. I have had some close calls with people nearly hitting the dolly but nothing out of the ordinary. The thing that I have to keep in mind is to slow down on the interstate for some corners as I am much longer, higher and heavier than say a lowboy.

I actually hated hauling beams until we got these new 3 axle trailers. Now I love it as they are so much easier to turn and steer than the old 4 and 6 axle trailers are.

This being my first time hauling steel beams I had to get used to the beam wiggle. What I mean is that the beam will flex side to side in the middle and you can actually feel it in the truck.

Thursday I had two other trucks talking on the CB about how difficult it would be but cool too. Then I explained to them how I had a wireless remote in the cab with me to steer the trailer with. In the last 6 beams that I have hauled, I have only been checked for permits one time at the scale and that was on the third beam. But then we haul so many of them through that particular scale they pretty much know us.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

I've often thought I'd like to do heavy haul, but those 100' beams scare me. I agree with G-Town - my hat's off to you!

I've seen a lot of wind turbine blades going down the road lately, and those look even scarier. I mean, they're designed to catch wind, right? And they deliver them to windy areas like the plains in Colorado and Wyoming, right? What could go wrong?

By the way, most heavy haul outfits do not move bridge beams. They are not set up for it. It is good that you are scared, as long as it is not paralyzing it makes you a more alert driver.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

spare.jpg

I'm guessing this isn't the first one of these in this thread, but this guy's got a spare (although it isn't full size).

(I know the picture is bad, I took it while walking by).

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Still hauling bridge beams.... 23 down and 20 to go. IMG_20160629_103531446_HDR.jpgIMG_20160630_140248194.jpgIMG_20160630_140342053.jpgIMG_20160630_140346200.jpg

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok guys and gals, we need some more flatbed photos. Bud and a few others have been posting. My loads are not normal. We need some more normal loads for the new guys and gals to look at.

It does not matter if it is ugly, boring or otherwise. We need to see that securement and the wrapping paper.... (Tarps).

On to other things......

Because of the fact that I was hitting the road early all week, I happened to max out my 60 hours for the week. Yes I am on the 60/7 schedule because I get a reset every week. I was also the only driver to get 5 beams hauled this week. There have been 2 other drivers hauling beams also. We have moved 26 beams so far and I have hauled 10 of them. Two more than each of the other drivers. I think that the boss has taken notice. He actually hauled 2 last week. He beat me to the pickup so I helped him chain and get out the door. He was going to stay and help me but I told him to go ahead I would be about an hour behind him.

Well he had issues with the trailer he was pulling, it was his first time using that trailer, and I actually beat him back to the delivery by an hour and a half.

Today my pilot car driver brought his 8 year old son with him. This kid absolutely loves equipment of any kind. When I make my first turn in Helena it is from a 3 lane (my direction) to a 2 lane road. I only have one lane to turn into because there is a lot of traffic and I am 125' long. So what I do is stop in the right hand lane so that I can start the motor on the dolly and then I have the pilot shut down the road. I then proceed toward the turn but as I am doing that I put the trailer in the far left lane while the truck remains in the right lane. These are steerable dollies. The little guy was amazed that I had the load across 3 lanes of traffic while moving straight forward. He actually made his dad stay so that he could watch the crane unload the beam today.

Last Friday I had to pull a load of pipe on our 53' quad axle flatbed. I have been moving beams for so long this summer that it felt like I was pulling a pup trailer because the axles were so close to the cab.

Anyhow, let's see some more loads. They are never boring when you show them to the world as you travel to your destination.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

A couple days ago I got behind two lowbowys hauling Tanks. I really wanted a picture for this thread but I left my phone in the sleeper.. When you have a cannon facing you it kinda detours tailgating.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I agree with pay there. I don't pull a flatbed but if like to see some other loads. I know the super long and big ones are cool but so are the regular one. I know every time I go to a hard I always check out the flatness and admire thier loads. If I wasn't too lazy to want to be out there in the heat to strap or tarp a load I would do it. Winter and cold don't bother me but I can't stand heat. Anything over 70 is too hot lol.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Airborne's Comment
member avatar

http://www.truckingtruth.com/truckers-forum/includes/smileys/embarrassed.gif

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Why are they called suicide coils?

double-quotes-end.png

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http://www.truckingtruth.com/truckers-forum/includes/smileys/embarrassed.gif

OUCH, I bet the driver had a tad bit of a headache after that screwup!!!! embarrassed.gifembarrassed.gifembarrassed.gif http://www.truckingtruth.com/truckers-forum/includes/smileys/embarrassed.gif

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Airborne's Comment
member avatar

The West Pennsylvania Ice Storm

I was securing the load of lumber I just got and while I was doing that, it started to snow. Once secured and tarped, I hit the road. Once on the Interstate , the ice storm hit. I could see it forming on the mirrors and antennas, as well as wiper arms. The thought went through my mind about black ice on the road. However, I did worry because the tires kept throwing mist. As long as the mist kept flying, I was confident. But the wiper arms were getting caked with ice and wouldn't wipe the windshield very good. It was about time for a load check/tire check (LCTC) and I found a rest area to conduct the inspection, and fix the wiper arms. When I got out to look, this is what I saw.....

336120150303_151248%20resized.jpg8064620150303_151255%20resized.jpg8347620150303_151310%20resized.jpg7391520150303_151351%20resized.jpg5034020150303_151411%20resized.jpg8895820150303_151527%20resized.jpg9549120150303_151538%20resized.jpg6969220150303_151601%20resized.jpg654420150303_151613%20resized.jpg2638520150303_151704%20resized.jpg853920150303_151721%20resized.jpg

Once I got into Ohio a ways, the ice began falling off and went away. This is OJT at its best.

I bet that ice added weight to the load and truck also!!!

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Airborne's Comment
member avatar

So today I learned that I made a dumb rookie mistake when securing my most recent load. I'm posting a pic to illustrate why the angle of the straps is so important, not to rat myself out.

On an indirect tiedown, the book says the straps should be at a >45°angle when viewed from the end. This is to ensure that there is enough downward pressure to increase the friction and to secure the cargo. Vertical securement requirement is 20% of the weight of the item.

This piece weighs only 1000 pounds. I had two straps on it for a WLL of 10,800, so I figured I was good to go. Since the piece is short, the strap angle is only about 30°, but my quick math said I was still ok. (You all remember trigonometry, don't you?)

Hauled this 1700 miles, and everything was cool until the last 100. Then it rotated a little, about three inches, which is thtee inches too much for my comfort. The straps were still tight, too. I had noticed about 150 miles out when I stopped that it had rotated about a half inch, so I tried to crank the straps but they were as tight as I could get them. I think it probably happened on some really rough roads in Tennessee.

About 50 miles later, another flatbedder called me on the CB and told me it had rotated. I thanked him and told him I had seen it, but decided to check again and saw that it had rotated more. Scared the crap out of me. I threw another strap on it and checked it twice in the last 100 miles.

The other pieces weigh almost 3x as much, but haven't budged with only 2 straps. The angle on those is about 60°.

The lesson for me is, either find another way to secure these when the straps are going to be at a low angle to the deck, or use 32x the required securement on them. (No, I don't have any friction pads. That's on my list of things to buy.)

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Again, not trying to get myself in trouble, just hoping someone else can learn from my dumb mistake.

you might try to belly wrap those type of loads, that may prvent them from moving around like they are. And also use a 3rd strap in the middle that goes over top.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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