LTL Trucking - My Linehaul Job

Topic 4501 | Page 20

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6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Enjoying my last day off this weekend (or rather night off).

The more I go into Jersey City and through the expressways of NY's 5 boroughs, the more I get comfortable. There are a couple of different ways to get to the same place. My route always takes me into Jersey City, but I can also wind up going over the Bayonne Bridge, George Washington Bridge, Tappan Zee Bridge, or possibly the Throgs Neck Bridge, depending on my next dispatch. The Goethals Bridge is my alternate route to get into Brooklyn if the Bayonne Bridge is shut down for construction. When I'm heading to Connecticut, it's either the GW or I'm heading out of my way a bit to go across the Tappan Zee into CT. Both bring you to 95 N. Throgs Neck is my way into Long Island.

A golden rule with NJ and NY - generally speaking, you can't drive a truck on the parkways, just the expressways. This is something to keep in mind for any of you guys going into the metro area for your first time. I've never made that mistake, but it does happen. Just putting it out there.

Here's another tip - listen to the radio. Every night before I reach Jersey City, I'm listening to Jersey 101.5. For any of you traveling into Jersey City or the 5 Boroughs, this is a good resource since they give traffic updates every 15 minutes on what bridges might be shut down due to construction, traffic, or accidents. It's always good to know a couple different ways to get to the same place when driving up here.

I still get a little "on guard" when I'm driving into the big city, but as with anything, it gets easier the more you do it. I usually try and spend a little time on Google Maps each weekend just to familiarize myself more and more with the area. All the expressways start to fit together like a puzzle.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Oh, and it baffles me as to why nobody in the Big Apple deems it a priority to remove that sign on the one underpass that reads 12'10" clearance. It's an underpass on the Cross Bronx Expressway ( I-95). I remember the first time I saw it, even though I knew I was on a truck route, my stomach lurched and I had my foot over the brake pedal. Ridiculous why nobody has taken that down yet. Laziness or red tape?

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

LTL Paid Training

Not sure if I've included this info already. I did a quick scan throughout my thread and didn't see anything. Anybody researching trucking as a career will eventually realize that there are lots of companies willing to pay for CDL A training. As with most things trucking, most people new to the industry are just aware of the major truckload companies. Some companies only pay for student training, meaning that you already have to have a CDL A from a trucking school (e.g. Crete / Shaffer or Schneider). Other companies will pay for your time when earning your CDL A, plus the training period (e.g. Prime).

Most of the truckload companies don't actually pay for your time while earning your CDL A. Most of them pay you a smaller amount during your training.

Believe it or not, there are LTL companies that will hire prospective drivers off the streets, pay them during the time it takes to earn their CDL A, and then train them. A lot of veteran drivers still think it takes a few years to even get their foot in the door as an experienced driver. This is not the case anymore. I'll repeat that as often as I need to - times have changed. There are LTL companies that will hire student drivers with their CDL A, and people off the street that don't even have a CDL A yet.

I know of two companies that will hire people off the street to earn their CDL A. ABF and Old Dominion. There might be more. I thought that was important info to share, since most folks are only aware of the truckload companies and their company-sponsored schooling. LTL has it too, and like all things LTL, you've just gotta be in the right location where there's a terminal nearby.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

Conway freight does to but depends on the terminal. I mean hire you off the street without a cdl a and pay you while you get your cdl

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Conway freight does to but depends on the terminal. I mean hire you off the street without a cdl a and pay you while you get your cdl

Thanks for the info Scott. I wasn't sure if they did that or not.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Here's another thought for folks that aren't keen on OTR , but don't have any job openings at a nearby LTL terminal. I know of guys at my terminal that will travel across the state for their wild bag position. Here's how it breaks down.

At my company, a wild bag is a 5 day work schedule, and you're possibly out for 4 days before returning home. Some drivers might have a closer terminal, but they aren't hiring. With the longer commute to and from a terminal that is a greater distance away, it's basically like a regional OTR gig, or a weekly gig, but you're paid a much higher wage at an LTL company. It's worth the commute for some drivers, as long as they are staying out for 4 days - basically like a weekly or regional truckload gig, but you're getting paid more.

So, if a local LTL terminal isn't hiring, consider one that might be the next closest location, and see if they have openings that allow you to stay out for the better part of a week, then it makes the commute worth while.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rainmaker's Comment
member avatar

6 string rhythm, I can not thank you enough for the time and effort you have put into this thread. I have learned a great deal from you as well as have discovered an option to going OTR when I graduate. LTL for a newbie? Who would have thought an opportunity like that existed for someone like me with no experience. Keep up the awesome job! One day our paths may cross on that wide open highway and when they do....Dinner is on me!

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

6 string rhythm, I can not thank you enough for the time and effort you have put into this thread. I have learned a great deal from you as well as have discovered an option to going OTR when I graduate. LTL for a newbie? Who would have thought an opportunity like that existed for someone like me with no experience. Keep up the awesome job! One day our paths may cross on that wide open highway and when they do....Dinner is on me!

The pleasure is all mine. Glad the thread helped.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brazuca D.'s Comment
member avatar

LTL Paid Training

Not sure if I've included this info already. I did a quick scan throughout my thread and didn't see anything. Anybody researching trucking as a career will eventually realize that there are lots of companies willing to pay for CDL A training. As with most things trucking, most people new to the industry are just aware of the major truckload companies. Some companies only pay for student training, meaning that you already have to have a CDL A from a trucking school (e.g. Crete / Shaffer or Schneider). Other companies will pay for your time when earning your CDL A, plus the training period (e.g. Prime).

Most of the truckload companies don't actually pay for your time while earning your CDL A. Most of them pay you a smaller amount during your training.

Believe it or not, there are LTL companies that will hire prospective drivers off the streets, pay them during the time it takes to earn their CDL A, and then train them. A lot of veteran drivers still think it takes a few years to even get their foot in the door as an experienced driver. This is not the case anymore. I'll repeat that as often as I need to - times have changed. There are LTL companies that will hire student drivers with their CDL A, and people off the street that don't even have a CDL A yet.

I know of two companies that will hire people off the street to earn their CDL A. ABF and Old Dominion. There might be more. I thought that was important info to share, since most folks are only aware of the truckload companies and their company-sponsored schooling. LTL has it too, and like all things LTL, you've just gotta be in the right location where there's a terminal nearby.

6 string rithym, I'd like to add another LTL company that have their own driving school " A Duie Pyle" I work for them as a P&D driver I attended their school in West Chester, PA. They paid for my hotel, the gas I spent going back and forth from Massachusetts where I live and work and still got a $500 weekly paycheck for 8 weeks. It's a great program for anyone willing to work hard as local P&D driver. If anyone need more info let me know. Sorry! I didn't mean to hijack your thread 6 rithym.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

6 string.... coming up your way on I81 to Mehoopany, PA / Procter & Gamble mill.... Let me know where you are cruising...

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