LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

By the way, we are indeed planning on adding a bunch of LTL carriers to TruckingTruth. I'm not sure if we're going to put them in a separate category or blend them in with the other companies but we're definitely going to add them to the list.

Because we're focused on new drivers we'll only add LTL companies that we can confirm are willing to hire students out of school or train people right off the street.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Bel A.'s Comment
member avatar

By the way, we are indeed planning on adding a bunch of LTL carriers to TruckingTruth. I'm not sure if we're going to put them in a separate category or blend them in with the other companies but we're definitely going to add them to the list.

Because we're focused on new drivers we'll only add LTL companies that we can confirm are willing to hire students out of school or train people right off the street.

That would be a good idea, confirming, that is.

We work out of an ODFL terminal that does not hire off the street, or put people through school. You can hire on as a dock worker first, and then apply for the driving school, but that's not a guarantee.

6 string was fortunate to catch the right company at the right time - some stunning growth in the company demanded a temporary change in policy to recruit more drivers. 8 years ago they wanted 2 years minimum and your first born child - the growth rate and driver retention crisis has warranted a different approach in SOME areas at SOME times.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
6 string was fortunate to catch the right company at the right time - some stunning growth in the company demanded a temporary change in policy to recruit more drivers. 8 years ago they wanted 2 years minimum and your first born child - the growth rate and driver retention crisis has warranted a different approach in SOME areas at SOME times.

Yeah, that's the concern I have. I don't want to send people on a wild goose chase and get their hopes up that they're going to come out of school making $60k+ and be home every night. In fact, 6 String is the first and only student I've ever come across that landed an LTL gig out of school. To this day I haven't heard from anyone else who has had any luck. But we'll dig around a bit and see what we can find out.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bel A.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

6 string was fortunate to catch the right company at the right time - some stunning growth in the company demanded a temporary change in policy to recruit more drivers. 8 years ago they wanted 2 years minimum and your first born child - the growth rate and driver retention crisis has warranted a different approach in SOME areas at SOME times.

double-quotes-end.png

Yeah, that's the concern I have. I don't want to send people on a wild goose chase and get their hopes up that they're going to come out of school making $60k+ and be home every night. In fact, 6 String is the first and only student I've ever come across that landed an LTL gig out of school. To this day I haven't heard from anyone else who has had any luck. But we'll dig around a bit and see what we can find out.

There's a few other LTL outfits that have lowered their entry requirements, and all experience seasonal shortages. Often it's a case of 'Johnny on the spot', not all are fortunate to be in the right place at the right time, or have the financial ability or patience to wait.

LTL can be a boring job for some. We're just leaving the company after 7 years, my only other option was to run solo with them - would have involved commuting 800 miles a week, and a dedicated run. Honestly a ddedicted run would have a gun to my head in about 2 weeks time, routine bores me to tears. Others like the security.

So, I bought my own truck cash, and will run open deck freight, leased on to a company's authority, mama can stay at the house and tend the garden.

I digress - YES, it's rare to land a 60k+ job straight out of school, BUT - it does reinforce the importance of paying for your own training and RESEARCHING (not just with a keyboard) your career.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Things to consider.

My home terminal is a break bulk terminal, and therefore provides more opportunity. It has its own in-house school, so not many OD terminals actually do hire off the street (meaning employees without a CDL A), unless if they have their own school or can shuttle the employee to a terminal nearby that has its own school. I'm not sure how that works, i.e. what criteria they use to determine whether it's feasible or viable to send an employee away to another terminal, perhaps distance between the two terminals?

The general hiring criteria across the board (at all terminals) for OD is that 12 months tractor trailer experience (notice not specifically OTR experience) is required OR completion of an approved driving school, or OD's own driver training program. Taken from the handbook:

Must have 12 months previous tractor trailer driving experience and/or be a graduate of a State Certified and Licensed truck driving school, acceptable to Old Dominion and/or have satisfactorily completed the Old Dominion truck driver training program (ODTDT 8/88)

For every LTL company, each terminal is almost like a 'mini company,' i.e. they have some policies specific to their individual terminals and hire according to need. General hiring policies still apply, but some have different opportunities. It's safe to say that an LTL terminal located in an area that is not as populated, relatively speaking, will not have as many opportunities or job openings, and competition will be more intense.

In my particular area of the Northeast, I had 1/2 dozen LTL companies to choose from, being a fresh graduate from a CDL driving school. Based on what other people have said, along with my own verification, I know that these following companies will hire student drivers with an existing CDL A. And some of these will have their own in-house training programs, depending on the individual terminal.

Old Dominion, Estes, Conway-Freight, ABF, Fed Ex Freight. There may be more. These are the ones I have verified. If a company terminal in a specific area is not hiring, it's not because they are in conflict with their general hiring requirements, it's because of the location.

Location, location, location. You have to be at the right place at the right time, but given how some of the country has a more dense population - think Northeast - there are enough opportunities out there for student or prospective commercial drivers to warrant a mention of LTL as a realistic opportunity. Mostly urban areas, locations along major freight lanes, and areas with a high population density, will offer prospective drivers the greatest opportunity. So, it's not necessarily limited to the Northeast, but the Northeast in general will offer a lot of opportunities for trucking jobs, LTL or truckload.

Brett, I think the inclusion of LTL companies is a great thing for this website, and that you can proceed to highlight these companies without wondering if you're misleading people. The key thing is location, and this needs to be explained. But given my argument that the locations where these opportunities exist will have a more dense population, you can be assured that an LTL job for a student driver is a realistic and attainable goal for a decent amount of prospective drivers, relative to the general population of the country.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you for such great information! I'm a newbie here, but husband is considering getting his CDL. We're only interested in LTL. We're currently in FL but want to move to NYC (I lived there awhile ago and want to go back). Know anything of opportunities there?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Amanda, I'll write more when I get home.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Brett, you do know of another TT member that's landed an LTL gig out of school ... mountaingirl. She's P&D.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for such great information! I'm a newbie here, but husband is considering getting his CDL. We're only interested in LTL. We're currently in FL but want to move to NYC (I lived there awhile ago and want to go back). Know anything of opportunities there?

Best thing to do is search each LTL company's website for terminals near your desired location. That'll get you started.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Jon R.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi All ..

In my 5 yrs instructing @ Sage Schools in Caldwell, Idaho , I knew many students who went directly to LTL / P&d from school .instead of going OTR with a major carrier , and there still doing the LTL & line haul gig . just depends on the preference of job you want in the industry ..

many went to work in the oil fields as well ( in 2007-8 ) .. and came back recently when those jobs dried up .. and went back to running 7- 8 west states .

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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