LTL Trucking - My Linehaul Job

Topic 4501 | Page 22

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J. Snow's Comment
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6 string was fortunate to catch the right company at the right time - some stunning growth in the company demanded a temporary change in policy to recruit more drivers. 8 years ago they wanted 2 years minimum and your first born child - the growth rate and driver retention crisis has warranted a different approach in SOME areas at SOME times.

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Yeah, that's the concern I have. I don't want to send people on a wild goose chase and get their hopes up that they're going to come out of school making $60k+ and be home every night. In fact, 6 String is the first and only student I've ever come across that landed an LTL gig out of school. To this day I haven't heard from anyone else who has had any luck. But we'll dig around a bit and see what we can find out.

I called one of the two schools (TDI-Sanford) here today and he said he has 7 LTL companies that he places brand new drivers with. We shall see. I'm speaking with my family this week and assuming all goes well I'll interview with the school next week and start school the following week. This site-and this thread in particular have been awesome to give me the information I need. What was holding me back was trying to figure out if I could handle the OTR lifestyle change. I'm single-but being home is important to me for my pets and my friends and my adult kid. I don't need to be home every night-but being home weekly is totally doable. I'll start a new 'newbie' thread with details once I finally get started. Again-Thanks guys! #cheers

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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I'll be excited to hear about your updates.

Marcus K.'s Comment
member avatar

Great thread . I never paid any attention to line haul job offers until now . I always assumed they were like dry van P&D running around in the cities delivering to stores .

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

A few 2016 Freightliner Cascadias have made their way into our yard. I've taken two different 2016 trucks for a spin the past two nights. The majority are to arrive around March. Our terminal uses tractors only up to two years old. It's great working for an LTL that has fantastic equipment - too many LTLs out there that are running some crusty looking stuff. Of course if it gets the job done, that's what counts, but I often see the same companies' crusty trucks stranded on the side of the road. Old Dominion has a preventative maintenance every 30 days for all equipment - tractors, trailers and dollies. I'm sure that's why an OD truck on the side of the road is not that common.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Great thread . I never paid any attention to line haul job offers until now . I always assumed they were like dry van P&D running around in the cities delivering to stores .

Yep, P&D is only 1/2 the LTL story. I love linehaul. Fits me like a glove. Glad you enjoyed the thread.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Jon R.'s Comment
member avatar

And 6 string ,

diversity is what trking co. are looking for on a resume , Yes there looking for time "more that 3 yrs w/ one carrier " but diversity " if you have done a little LTL / some OTR , that's what attract's them to a perspective driver ..

and I've seem my share of new road testees who have done their time OTR then did some line haul ,, then back to regional OTR ,, for past 15 yrs ,, then settled back back into sole LTL / and line haul w/ a local co . so for A week or two they will do local P&D .. the fill in for line haul guy pulling doubles & tripples ...then back to P&D ...I did that for 15 yrs ...then did some regional casual " & some ..instructing ,,,

but diversity is great ..

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

J. Snow's Comment
member avatar

Checked the OD website today and the only positions they are hiring for in FL are P&D. At the moment. :)

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Checked the OD website today and the only positions they are hiring for in FL are P&D. At the moment. :)

Don't go by the website. Often it's not updated according to specific terminal needs. Call them.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

And 6 string ,

diversity is what trking co. are looking for on a resume , Yes there looking for time "more that 3 yrs w/ one carrier " but diversity " if you have done a little LTL / some OTR , that's what attract's them to a perspective driver ..

and I've seem my share of new road testees who have done their time OTR then did some line haul ,, then back to regional OTR ,, for past 15 yrs ,, then settled back back into sole LTL / and line haul w/ a local co . so for A week or two they will do local P&D .. the fill in for line haul guy pulling doubles & tripples ...then back to P&D ...I did that for 15 yrs ...then did some regional casual " & some ..instructing ,,,

but diversity is great ..

I know Jon, you keep preaching diversity. I think you've said it like three times already. I understand what you're trying to say, but I'm not looking to build a good looking resume. One and done for me.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

J. Snow's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Checked the OD website today and the only positions they are hiring for in FL are P&D. At the moment. :)

double-quotes-end.png

Don't go by the website. Often it's not updated according to specific terminal needs. Call them.

Will do. Not sure it would be a good fit as it looks like their closest terminal is in JAX and I'm in Orlando.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

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