LTL Trucking - My Linehaul Job

Topic 4501 | Page 23

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Scott D's Comment
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Wow! What a great thread! 6 string you have done a great job here - and congratulations on finding a job in the industry that works so well for your situation. So much outstanding information here that was contributed by everyone. Thanks so much for taking the time! Getting ready for school in the spring so all of the info is very helpful. Thanks for paying it forward. (Rainmaker - great pic/avatar). One question - does anyone have any more info/specifics how team driving in the LTL arena works? Thanks again for the superb thread!

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Hey ScottandMaggie. Glad you've enjoyed the thread.

Teaming in LTL is pretty similar to truckload, except that you usually are home weekly and get paid more. I can only relay info from my company, Old Dominion. Typically you're out 6 days in a row until you take your time off at home. The truck is always moving. The company does lay you over at hotels on occasion. Being a team truck, you'll have a sleeper cab, but the trucks still don't quite have the amenities as some of these other truckload carriers. But what you would like more, a fancy truck or fat paycheck?

Pay is definitely over .60 cpm. Might be closer to mid 60s. I'm not sure. Team drivers will certainly gross 80k plus per each driver. If you're a husband and wife team, you can bank on having a dual income for the household that is six figures - NET (meaning AFTER all taxes and deductions). Truckload companies don't pay team drivers close to that - just like solo drivers. I don't know what LTL companies have teams, but I know Old Dominion does. Also, nice thing about it, is that if you don't live close to a terminal , you can always commute, since you'll be driving distances anyhow and not coming home every day. I have a buddy in MO that used to team with his wife for OD. They commuted to a Kansas terminal. Not a big deal since they weren't coming home everyday.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Scott D's Comment
member avatar

Thanks again 6string

Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

A friend I went to truck school with started at Estes doing P & D fresh out of school starting at $21.55 per hour. Does P & D pay hourly and line haul by the mile? Thanks for your input and thread!

P & D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Jon R.'s Comment
member avatar

Out here in Boise Id . the Estes terminal . here & in Salt lake Ut. / Portland Or .they do pay by the hr. if you return to the same terminal that day , if you run to Portland take 10 off & return , then some times they will pay by the mi. + pay for the motel & Per diem( food ) .. and if ya have to chain & hook /un hook that BTH .. I did that for 10 + yrs .. from Boise Id to portland Or.. Boise, Id Seattle Wa. (Fred meyers & other Co's ) ,,and Boise, Id . salt lake, Ut. T/ A . all line haul tripples / summer (all d/h )...doubbles winter ..1990- 2002 .. then back to regional , then to instructing , now casual ..

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Jon R. I'm in Columbus, Ohio and thinking of stopping by the terminal tomorrow to talk with them about a career. Not making much OTR! Think I could use more home time at this point also.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jon R.'s Comment
member avatar

Eric S. I hear ya . after doing OTR from 80-91 ,I got tired of the OTR thing to so that's why went to the line haul GIG as well .. home time ..etc.. "started w/ Yellow freight in Boise Id. / then UPS . seasonal .. then some area freight co.'s ..for 10 + yrs . then went back to regional when I couldnt physically hook/ & push / pull dollies any more .. I'm not the young buck any more !

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

Yea I'm filling out an application tomorrow. Can't wait to see what happens. .52/starting point sounds pretty good to me and she told me P & D was $22.40 an hour to start. Those figures make more sense to me for all I have done and gone through to get into this line of work. Just want to be paid a fair wage. Fingers crossed!

P & D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainmaker's Comment
member avatar

Wow! What a great thread! 6 string you have done a great job here - and congratulations on finding a job in the industry that works so well for your situation. So much outstanding information here that was contributed by everyone. Thanks so much for taking the time! Getting ready for school in the spring so all of the info is very helpful. Thanks for paying it forward. (Rainmaker - great pic/avatar). One question - does anyone have any more info/specifics how team driving in the LTL arena works? Thanks again for the superb thread!

Well thank you!

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Eric S. I hear ya . after doing OTR from 80-91 ,I got tired of the OTR thing to so that's why went to the line haul GIG as well .. home time ..etc.. "started w/ Yellow freight in Boise Id. / then UPS . seasonal .. then some area freight co.'s ..for 10 + yrs . then went back to regional when I couldnt physically hook/ & push / pull dollies any more .. I'm not the young buck any more !

Those dollies are bears, especially when a tire gets stuck in a pothole or even a small rock. I always grab one with super singles instead of duelies - easier to steer with your hands.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Super Singles:

A single, wide wheel substituted for a tandem (two wheel) assembly. The main benefit of a super single is a reduction in weight and lower rolling resistance which provide better fuel economy. The disadvantage is the lack of tire redundancy (or a 'backup tire' in case of a blowout) from which tandem wheels benefit. A tire blowout is more dangerous with a super single and can not be driven on.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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