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LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

Topic 4501 | Page 33

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Mike J.'s Comment
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6 string thank you very much for all of the time and effort that you put into this thread. I read all 32 pages and received more answers to my questions then from any other source that I have access to.

I followed your Old Dominion link to their website. I then searched by state and under Colorado service centers this is what it listed. Denver, CO. Colorado Springs, CO. Grand Junction, CO. Cheyenne, WY. Farmington, NM. Vernal, UT. Moab, UT. I was wondering as a Colorado driver if these are the terminals that I would be driving to and from? My reason for asking is that I noticed that 4 of them are from states other then Colorado. I assume each terminal has an assigned area that they cover for pickup and deliveries.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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Hi Mike.

I'm not familiar with runs from CO. I'm only familiar with the northeast. From what I've been told, the distance between meet points / terminals is greater in the west and midwest compared to the northeast, which makes sense. When I type in PA, I can see they list terminals in 3 other states - NY, DE, and OH. Oddly enough, out of all the service centers under "PA," the only one I haven't been to is actually in PA, the Erie terminal.

So I think it can vary according to terminal and region. As far as scheduled runs, they're only gonna send you out as far as you can make it back to complete a turn. If you're bagging out, you can go a lot farther.

Pickup and delivery will be a smaller radius compared to linehaul. Our P&D drivers might do 150 miles a day. In linehaul , we're doing from upper 300 to close to 700 miles a day.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

I was thinking about updating the other week since I just recently passed my two year anniversary at Old Dominion. I'm loving the job more and more. With more seniority I'm getting even better options when it comes to bidding for runs. We recently got a raise too. OD linehaul top rate is now .637 cpm. That means on a run that's about 2500 miles a week, a driver could gross at least $75k a year. Most of the runs at my barn are 500 miles a day or more. We have some as low as 2000, and some as high as 3200 a week.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Hey, congrats on the two year anniversary!

6 string rhythm's Comment
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Thanks Brett, I appreciate that. This website / forum had a big part to play in the beginning of my trucking career.

Heavy C's Comment
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This guy is jealous....

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Brett, I appreciate that. This website / forum had a big part to play in the beginning of my trucking career.

Well you've been our undisputed king when it comes to helping people understand the LTL side of the industry so thank you for that!

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
G-Town's Comment
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Congratulations on completing 2 years 6 String!

SBL's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

It's amazing how much info you have gathered on both types of trucking.

It's hard to believe you are just starting out!! lol... How did you come across all this knowledge without being in the field ?

double-quotes-end.png

LOL. Lot's of reading, talking with drivers on the phone, meeting drivers at truck stops, and constantly thinking about options. As a stay-at-home-Dad, I used to take my toddler on road trips to terminals and truck stops, partly because I had no idea what to do with her anymore, partly because I wanted to soak it all up. I've been self-employed the past few years so I had the freedom to do this.

During my eight weeks at trucking school, I asked question upon question. My one instructor was a driver for 25 plus years. There's a lot of knowledge and wisdom to be gained from the internet forums and other drivers in person, if you can chew up the meat and spit out the bones. The positive and successful drivers who love their profession are almost always saying the same things, so are the complainers and slackers ;)

Keep in mind I've also been reading about trucking and researching for about three years. Much to the chagrin of my wife, I spent a lot of time on these forums, trying to educate myself with the facts and learn from others' experiences. I needed to see if this was the career for me and my family. My wife fully supports me, and that's a plus. I get to go drive a truck and be a man, she gets to stay at home and be a home-maker. We'll be like a typical 50's family, sort of like the Cleavers ... smile.gif

I'm happy to share all the info I've absorbed. It's threads like these, I hope, that might give prospective drivers the freedom of options.

Are you a Owner Operator? I'm an OTR driver w/ an LLC. Thinking about running LTL my question is how do I keep my LLC. If I'm hired to an LTL company I don't own my own truck. If I'm hired as a Linehaul driver what do I need to do to keep my business name if I'm not hired as a lease driver.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar
Are you a Owner Operator? I'm an OTR driver w/ an LLC. Thinking about running LTL my question is how do I keep my LLC. If I'm hired to an LTL company I don't own my own truck. If I'm hired as a Linehaul driver what do I need to do to keep my business name if I'm not hired as a lease driver.

Though 6 String hasn't posted in awhile - he is an "employee" (W2 Company Driver).

From a business standpoint here (as we don't really discuss lease or O/O stuff on this forum)...

You probably won't be able to get a company that hires you to drive their equipment (company driver), to pay you as a corporate entity (Sub-S/LLC). OTOH - they might consider it, since it saves them taxes, health insurance, etc.

The problem is TWO FOLD.

Companies that use drivers/subcontractors to operate their equipment under the same hours, rules, etc. - as company drivers, have been SUED (by the drivers) and found to have "misclassified" these "company drivers" as contractors. Technically (legally) unless you own or lease the equipment and are "under contract" - you are a "company employee" in the eyes of labor law and IRS Regs.

So while you "might" be able to get them to hire you are a 1099/sub-contractor and pay your LLC with no withholding taxes/etc. - if you say got injured or something and went against their WC or PIP/BI coverage - it could open up a whole other can of worms for them.

If you are currently an LLC - then you are likely leasing from your current company. If you are not leasing and driving their equipment - then "legally" you should be a W2 Company Driver and should not be getting paid as an LLC.

Out of curiosity - aside from minimizing your personal income (on paper) as an LLC - what advantage do you see continuing to run as one?

Rick

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
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