LTL Trucking - My Linehaul Job

Topic 4501 | Page 34

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G-Town's Comment
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6-String...took this in Galesburg Illinois while attending their annual Railroad Days event. Thought it would be a welcome addition to your thread.

1499797172.3677.jpg

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Cool brother! Great pic!

I saw a Wal-Mart trailer pulled off by the A&W convenience store / gas station on US 30 in Bedford this evening - only to see a Schneider truck pulling it. Was I mistaken or do you get out to that Bedford Wal-Mart as part of your route? Where are you usually running? I'm always on the hunt for Old School on the turnpike or 81. My head snaps every time I see a grey SAPA Volvo pulling a flatbed.

Hey, you'd look good in a green polo shirt!

smile.gif

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

6-String wrote:

Cool brother! Great pic!

I saw a Wal-Mart trailer pulled off by the A&W convenience store / gas station on US 30 in Bedford this evening - only to see a Schneider truck pulling it. Was I mistaken or do you get out to that Bedford Wal-Mart as part of your route? Where are you usually running? I'm always on the hunt for Old School on the turnpike or 81. My head snaps every time I see a grey SAPA Volvo pulling a flatbed.

Hey, you'd look good in a green polo shirt!

smile.gif

Rarely west of York/Harrisburg/Williamsport. Anything east of those three locations is where I spend the majority of my time. My jaunts on WB76 exit at either West Shore, East Shore or RT72. I've been to the Bedford DC area only a couple of times during blitz week (the week before Thanksgiving).

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

New linehaul raise brings top rate up to .6568 cpm.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Christian R.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey 6 string just wanted to add myself to the list, I have been working for an Otr company that I won’t bad mouth and things didn’t live up to what was promised. I applied at Old dominion and now a rookie with 6 months Otr exp got a contingent offer of employment pending background and drug test. Which I have my twic and I don’t do drugs so I’ll be fine on that stuff. I’ll let you know if anything goes sideways but as of right now I’ll Be your neighbor in the east working out of the Allentown terminal. See you around hopefully.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Hi Jared.

Yes, most linehaul jobs are the same, save for the fact that some companies want their L/H drivers to work the dock too. Not sure if Fed Ex requires that, I know Con-Way Freight does, but they've been bought out by XPO, so we'll see if their policy changes. OD doesn't make their L/H drivers work the dock, unless you're at a small terminal that needs everybody to be a jack of all trades.

In regard to pay, most L/H gigs pay relatively the same, union or non-union. Top rate at OD is currently around .62 cpm for L/H drivers. It takes two years to reach top rate. At our terminal, we have some guys that are raking down 100k plus a year, but they've got the bigger runs. Most drivers are between 70k - 90k. It all depends on the miles.

My miles have been fluctuating, simply because I've been running wild or extraboard - by choice. I enjoy the variety, but really chose to run wild because that's all I can get right now to run days. I prefer days for the family. I can have a schedule if I run nights. Daylight schedules take a few years at my terminal, so if I wanna run days, I gotta go wild. Even still, running wild, I pretty much average 2500 miles a week, 10k a month. WIth all my accessory pay in addition to miles, I'm routinely grossing at least $1,500 a week, sometimes around $1,700. Not bad for getting to run daylight linehaul and being home every night. smile.gif

Biggest challenges? Getting to know some of the terminal locations in the metro NYC area. Getting used to running nights. Adapting to a demanding work schedule - pretty much the type of schedule most trucking jobs require, it's long hours.

But I love this job. Love this company. Love being a linehaul driver.

I'll write more later ....

Hey 6 string, after reading this thread and when my 1st year is up at CRST I might consider a move to an LTL company also. I was thinking in order from top to bottom: UPS, FedEx, XPO Logistics, and after reading your thread here, Old Dominion. I want to see if first CRST has any LTL dedicated routes with any of those 4 companies. If so I could stay with the same company and still move up. I would want to move either to Cupertino CA or Bloomington MN before I do make that change though. Are there any great LTL opportunities with those 4 companies out of either one of those cities that would pay good money?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I would want to move either to Cupertino CA or Bloomington MN

Where on Earth did you come up with those two choices?

Enjoy the cost of living in Cupertino if you go that route. omg.......

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I would want to move either to Cupertino CA or Bloomington MN

double-quotes-end.png

Where on Earth did you come up with those two choices?

Enjoy the cost of living in Cupertino if you go that route. omg.......

The greatest tech company ever is based in Cupertino: Apple Inc. Also for Bloomington: Ready access to anything I need and still not far from CRST. Cupertino is more of a pipe dream of mine. Bloomington is more realistic and either one is still several years down the road for me.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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