Best Trucking Companies To Drive For??

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Note: "EveryDay" I deleted that link you posted on the top companies to work for because of this:

This report draws information from glassdoor.com and Hoover’s to match the companies with the sentiment of their employees who have freely and anonymously given their opinions of their employers. It is also relevant as to how many employees gave their opinions.

Asking for anonymous reviews from employees and citing websites like Glassdoor tells you nothing of value. First of all, if you're going to give a review of something you better be willing to stamp your name on it. I'm not going to base my life and career decisions on anonymous reviews that can't be substantiated in any way.

To give you an example of how useless that kind of information is, Wal-mart has one of the lowest rankings on that page based upon their Glassdoor.com rating. Well isn't that helpful. Wal-mart famously has one of the best paying and most desirable fleets to work for in the nation and has for a very long time. That's not even debatable. They pay great, they have awesome benefits, they have good equipment, you get home a lot, and you're treated well. You also need experience and a great record to work there.

Wow, too bad you have prejudged Swift. Their home is Phoenix, AZ. My son runs with Swift from Florida and has been in and out of Arizona multiple times over the last three month. He gets home every 3-4 weeks depending on when he wants home time.

See? Bummer, huh? One person hates the company, the next person loves em. That's why reviews of trucking companies based upon driver opinions instead of objective and quantifiable information isn't worth a hill of beans. Every company I worked for over the years treated me well and ran me so hard I couldn't beg for a short nap half the time. And yet every company I worked for had a long list of drivers that hated them. In fact, many times over the years I'd meet drivers that actually had the same dispatcher I did. They hated the company, hated the dispatcher, and couldn't get any miles. In the meantime I'm making great money, running great miles, and get along splendidly with my dispatcher.

Look at a company's pay, benefits, home time, opportunities with various fleets, running areas, equipment, and types of freight. That's how you pick a company to work for. Don't worry too much about what other people say. You're going to get the entire range of the spectrum on every company - from love to hate. The problem is you won't know the quality of the driver you're getting an opinion of and that is going to determine the driver's happiness and success far more than the quality of the company you're working for. A great driver will do well pretty much anywhere they work. A lousy one is going to be miserable pretty much anywhere they work. The best drivers get the most miles, the best runs, the best treatment, and the most favors when they need em. The lousy drivers get tossed any scraps that might be left over and otherwise spend half their time sitting in truck stops complaining.

That's the reality in this industry.

We have an excellent series of articles that will help you find the right truck driving job. Have a look through those and you'll understand your options better and learn what information is the most important when making a decision.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sandman's Comment
member avatar

If you're looking for some of the best companies then you need to go to a private truck driving school or college that offers cdl training. This can be more expensive but a lot of companies will pay you back tuition cost. If you don't have the money or don't qualify for any loans. Company Sponsored training is a lot less out of pocket. Bad thing and good things are said about these companies. Just remember, It is what you make it. Don't let others determine your experience with these companies. Get the year or how ever long done then move to a job that may better suit you. In my opinion is, the best trucking companies do not have company sponsored training. They either hire you from a cdl training program or you have experience already.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

truckersgirl53's Comment
member avatar

It's not a definite no and can't comment further.

Sandman's Comment
member avatar

Note: "EveryDay" I deleted that link you posted on the top companies to work for because of this:

double-quotes-start.png

This report draws information from glassdoor.com and Hoover’s to match the companies with the sentiment of their employees who have freely and anonymously given their opinions of their employers. It is also relevant as to how many employees gave their opinions.

double-quotes-end.png

Asking for anonymous reviews from employees and citing websites like Glassdoor tells you nothing of value. First of all, if you're going to give a review of something you better be willing to stamp your name on it. I'm not going to base my life and career decisions on anonymous reviews that can't be substantiated in any way.

To give you an example of how useless that kind of information is, Wal-mart has one of the lowest rankings on that page based upon their Glassdoor.com rating. Well isn't that helpful. Wal-mart famously has one of the best paying and most desirable fleets to work for in the nation and has for a very long time. That's not even debatable. They pay great, they have awesome benefits, they have good equipment, you get home a lot, and you're treated well. You also need experience and a great record to work there.

double-quotes-start.png

Wow, too bad you have prejudged Swift. Their home is Phoenix, AZ. My son runs with Swift from Florida and has been in and out of Arizona multiple times over the last three month. He gets home every 3-4 weeks depending on when he wants home time.

double-quotes-end.png

See? Bummer, huh? One person hates the company, the next person loves em. That's why reviews of trucking companies based upon driver opinions instead of objective and quantifiable information isn't worth a hill of beans. Every company I worked for over the years treated me well and ran me so hard I couldn't beg for a short nap half the time. And yet every company I worked for had a long list of drivers that hated them. In fact, many times over the years I'd meet drivers that actually had the same dispatcher I did. They hated the company, hated the dispatcher, and couldn't get any miles. In the meantime I'm making great money, running great miles, and get along splendidly with my dispatcher.

Look at a company's pay, benefits, home time, opportunities with various fleets, running areas, equipment, and types of freight. That's how you pick a company to work for. Don't worry too much about what other people say. You're going to get the entire range of the spectrum on every company - from love to hate. The problem is you won't know the quality of the driver you're getting an opinion of and that is going to determine the driver's happiness and success far more than the quality of the company you're working for. A great driver will do well pretty much anywhere they work. A lousy one is going to be miserable pretty much anywhere they work. The best drivers get the most miles, the best runs, the best treatment, and the most favors when they need em. The lousy drivers get tossed any scraps that might be left over and otherwise spend half their time sitting in truck stops complaining.

That's the reality in this industry.

We have an excellent series of articles that will help you find the right truck driving job. Have a look through those and you'll understand your options better and learn what information is the most important when making a decision.

Where is your proof on Walmart having one of the best fleets? That hear say... once again someone judges before they know and from you that is shocking. I expected more from you. Walmart is notorious on bad practice with employment is all areas of the business. I worked for Walmart in shipping and I have seen first hand the poor treatment to the truck drivers. So if their rank is low, it was deserved. Plus most employees that still work for the company they are taking about don't want their information available for the employer to see. Guess what would happen? You would get fired. Then you would have to court just get anything out of the employer that they owed you or ect. Plus they also would have proof of slander, this would only work in some states.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sandman's Comment
member avatar

Note: "EveryDay" I deleted that link you posted on the top companies to work for because of this:

double-quotes-start.png

This report draws information from glassdoor.com and Hoover’s to match the companies with the sentiment of their employees who have freely and anonymously given their opinions of their employers. It is also relevant as to how many employees gave their opinions.

double-quotes-end.png

Asking for anonymous reviews from employees and citing websites like Glassdoor tells you nothing of value. First of all, if you're going to give a review of something you better be willing to stamp your name on it. I'm not going to base my life and career decisions on anonymous reviews that can't be substantiated in any way.

To give you an example of how useless that kind of information is, Wal-mart has one of the lowest rankings on that page based upon their Glassdoor.com rating. Well isn't that helpful. Wal-mart famously has one of the best paying and most desirable fleets to work for in the nation and has for a very long time. That's not even debatable. They pay great, they have awesome benefits, they have good equipment, you get home a lot, and you're treated well. You also need experience and a great record to work there.

double-quotes-start.png

Wow, too bad you have prejudged Swift. Their home is Phoenix, AZ. My son runs with Swift from Florida and has been in and out of Arizona multiple times over the last three month. He gets home every 3-4 weeks depending on when he wants home time.

double-quotes-end.png

See? Bummer, huh? One person hates the company, the next person loves em. That's why reviews of trucking companies based upon driver opinions instead of objective and quantifiable information isn't worth a hill of beans. Every company I worked for over the years treated me well and ran me so hard I couldn't beg for a short nap half the time. And yet every company I worked for had a long list of drivers that hated them. In fact, many times over the years I'd meet drivers that actually had the same dispatcher I did. They hated the company, hated the dispatcher, and couldn't get any miles. In the meantime I'm making great money, running great miles, and get along splendidly with my dispatcher.

Look at a company's pay, benefits, home time, opportunities with various fleets, running areas, equipment, and types of freight. That's how you pick a company to work for. Don't worry too much about what other people say. You're going to get the entire range of the spectrum on every company - from love to hate. The problem is you won't know the quality of the driver you're getting an opinion of and that is going to determine the driver's happiness and success far more than the quality of the company you're working for. A great driver will do well pretty much anywhere they work. A lousy one is going to be miserable pretty much anywhere they work. The best drivers get the most miles, the best runs, the best treatment, and the most favors when they need em. The lousy drivers get tossed any scraps that might be left over and otherwise spend half their time sitting in truck stops complaining.

That's the reality in this industry.

We have an excellent series of articles that will help you find the right truck driving job. Have a look through those and you'll understand your options better and learn what information is the most important when making a decision.

What about this link? http://www.thetrucker.com/News/Stories/2014/9/17/Wal-MarttruckdriversgrantedclassactionstatusinCaliforniaminimumwagelawsuit.aspx

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

Sorry my comment warranted getting deleted. That was not my intent to unhelpful.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Where is your proof on Walmart having one of the best fleets?

Compare their pay, benefits, home time, equipment, and job duties to other fleets. That has always been one of the most coveted jobs in trucking. If anything has changed recently I haven't heard anything of it.

What about this link?

It's the same thing that's been going on for decades in trucking. A group of drivers is trying to sue because of the pay structure of the company. Here's a quote from the article:

Tasks including fueling, washing, and weighing trucks are not separately paid

Almost nobody in trucking gets paid for those things.

Another quote....

As to the waiting time issue, drivers are not separately compensated for all time spent waiting.

Again, drivers are often times not compensated for waiting time. That's how the industry has always worked. Some companies pay detention, some don't, and most get away with the least amount possible. Personally I never felt like I needed to be paid while I'm sleeping in my bunk waiting to be loaded. Maybe I have an old-school mentality and the world has passed me by but I don't expect to be paid when I'm not working. But others will sue you for it.....

Another quote...

Drivers were paid $42 for 10-hour layover periods. A layover is earned when taking a mandatory DOT break and is not paid in conjunction with any other type of pay

So by law you have to take a 10 hour break after 14 hours on duty. Wal-mart drivers not only get paid for the work they do but then get paid for their mandatory 10 hour break. Must be nice...that's the first time I've ever heard of anyone getting paid for their mandatory off-duty time break.

I could go on all day. This is an attempted money grab by former drivers who were organized by teams of lawyers looking to make a quick buck off a giant corporation. It happens a thousand times a day. It's called blackmail when lawyers aren't doing it. Pay us or else....

Compare their pay, benefits, home time, job duties, equipment, and working environment to any trucking company in the nation. You'll almost never find a better fleet to work for.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Sorry my comment warranted getting deleted. That was not my intent to unhelpful.

No, yours didn't warrant it but you were responding to another comment that did. So it would have been confusing if I deleted the comment you were responding to but not your comment. People would think you were talking to ghosts!

rofl-3.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

Ahhh makes total sense Brett. It would have looked ridiculous.

I also have to say that I've heard nothing but great things about driving for Wal-Mart. Even my instructor at my school says that if he had his choice he would work for them in a heartbeat because they offer the total package to drivers.

Now if they could only treat the rest of their employees the same way. But that's a topic for a different discussion.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Now if they could only treat the rest of their employees the same way. But that's a topic for a different discussion.

Exactly. I think that goes for corporate America in general though. Corporations have the largest amount of cash and the highest profits in history as noted by CNBC and various articles around the Web. And yet blue collar wages haven't kept up in many, many years. I don't think Walmart is any different that the rest of em. There definitely needs to be changes made if we want to have a strong, healthy economy in this country.

But none of that has anything to do with driving for Wal-mart. That's a great company to drive for.

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