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Out of logbook hours but told to drive

Topic 676 | Page 2

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Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Even tho I know its hard to find a place to park...I would never park on a fuel island...Its a real picky subject to truckers, for alot of good reasons. But for me, all I can think of is the danged place catching fire, and there I am, right in the middle of the grill. OR someone pulling my 5th wheel pin as they walk by, and me not knowing. And...do you do your pre trip parked on the fuel island ?? Its just a thing for me...I can always manage to find a spot in the dirt or mud...and I will admit...I have parked on the CAT scale to sleep...but I cleared it with the fuel desk first...

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Even tho I know its hard to find a place to park...I would never park on a fuel island...Its a real picky subject to truckers, for alot of good reasons. But for me, all I can think of is the danged place catching fire, and there I am, right in the middle of the grill. OR someone pulling my 5th wheel pin as they walk by, and me not knowing. And...do you do your pre trip parked on the fuel island ?? Its just a thing for me...I can always manage to find a spot in the dirt or mud...and I will admit...I have parked on the CAT scale to sleep...but I cleared it with the fuel desk first...

I cleared it with the fuel desk first and trust me had their been anywhere else to park I would have and when I say their was no place to "make" a spot there really wasnt. I was in London, OH. No spots at the TA, Pilot, Speedway or behind McDonalds. I could barely maneuver around the parking lots to even look for spots to park because of all the made spots. It was the only option. I slept there a few hrs and moved into a spot in the morning.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Oh and ps it was next to the fuel island and not blocking a pump. I was right next to the 1st pump and the door.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Using the 2 hour safe haven rule is an excellent way to handle that! I hadn't considered that option. That's why it's so important nowadays to know those logbook rules. With electronic logs you need every advantage you can get.

My heart almost stopped when you said you were sleeping in the fuel island, but as long as you weren't blocking any pumps then you're fine. But seriously, people get extremely upset about that sort of thing and there are drivers out there that will pull your 5th wheel pin or cut air lines or all sorts of things to make a point about that.

And Starcar made an excellent point about safety - you're sitting in a very dangerous place.

Believe me, I fully understand the parking thing after 15 years out there but don't block fuel islands for your own safety if nothing else.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David's Comment
member avatar

David, is your system setup where you can drive a certain number of miles at a very slow speed as "off duty driving" or something to that effect? I know a lot of people have mentioned that their company has policies that will allow them to do something like that for the exact reason we're talking about. Maybe you just have to drive two miles to the nearest truck stop but you're out of hours. So you can flip it into "off duty driving" and drive either a limited distance or at a limited speed to get where you need to go.

We can drive for 3/4 mi before it pops into driving. really sucks. Swift drivers are pretty limited with that..

We too don't get the off duty driving line (Line 5) but O/O do.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

I actually had this discussion with another driver one night at the Petro in W. Memphis. His hours ran out being unloaded one night, and security told him to leave or they'd call the police. He told them to go ahead, so they did. When the cop showed up and asked why he was refusing to leave, he showed the cop his log and said "if I leave, I'll be in violation." The cop said " you're right," turned to the security guard, and said "he's staying."

Mind you, I'm not suggesting this as a recommended course of action for this situation. Being belligerent rarely actually pays off.

Troubador222's Comment
member avatar

Heh, in my mind, better the fuel island than the entrance or exit, like I have seen trucks parked. I have by passed truck stops because someone was parked in the entrance and the turn was so tight I was worried I would hit something.

We rarely face that situation on hours and being at a shipper with teams. We manage our time so that one of us always has hours. One advantage to teams.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Using the 2 hour safe haven rule is an excellent way to handle that! I hadn't considered that option. That's why it's so important nowadays to know those logbook rules. With electronic logs you need every advantage you can get.

My heart almost stopped when you said you were sleeping in the fuel island, but as long as you weren't blocking any pumps then you're fine. But seriously, people get extremely upset about that sort of thing and there are drivers out there that will pull your 5th wheel pin or cut air lines or all sorts of things to make a point about that.

And Starcar made an excellent point about safety - you're sitting in a very dangerous place.

Believe me, I fully understand the parking thing after 15 years out there but don't block fuel islands for your own safety if nothing else.

Trust me I circled all the parking lots I mentioned 3 times before I finally had no option but to ask. Ive heard the stories bout these drivers doing nutty things out here. Which is why at minimum I always check my airlines, 5th wheel, tandums, seal and lights. I was surprised noone bothered me and I woke up at 8:30am! Guess I lucked out.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
crazy rebel's Comment
member avatar

We have a line 5 on our e logs itscalled driving off duty we can use it when mty only and to get to a safe haven anything over an hr is in violation and results in a write up

Tesserae's Comment
member avatar

We have 'personal drive time''. Can't be under a load or even assigned a load to use it. If you have the right dm , and you're empty, you can have them temporarily remove a load assignment so u can use personal drive time.

If at shipper/receiver and run over 14 and can't stay, we are told to call safety to get a tow out.

If under 45 mph and less than 3 miles, can run on line 1 without triggering qc to line 3. Very helpful when u have to get through gate at the customer, get the bills, and hook up all without starting your 14. Of course I nor any other drivers have behaved thataway.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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