TruckingTruth logo

Security Guard VS HoS

Topic 676 | Page 3

Page 3 of 7 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
If at shipper/receiver and run over 14 and can't stay, we are told to call safety to get a tow out.

What?????? Wow, that's an unbelievably expensive solution! I can't imagine a company paying to have the truck towed for that reason. Wow.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tesserae's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

If at shipper/receiver and run over 14 and can't stay, we are told to call safety to get a tow out.

double-quotes-end.png

What?????? Wow, that's an unbelievably expensive solution! I can't imagine a company paying to have the truck towed for that reason. Wow.

I totally agree. I was in dfw newly solo. Ran out of hrs and couldn't sit at shipper for 10 so I left to find safe haven. Big mistake. Resulting conference call involved logs,safety, and dm. I've talked to 1 other driver that has invoked the tow thing and received no backlash for doing it, but u gotta figure there goes any profit for the next 3 loads. Best to be a company driver in that scenario!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Andy C.'s Comment
member avatar

I'd like to rehash this subject if i may... I'm still having a tough time with the hours of service rules. I think i understand the drive nine hours idea, I'll be trying that. More times than not I've wound up over the past two weeks with 5 or. Six hours to get to my consignee , but an hour or so short on my clock. I've driven myself to the point where i am on the side of the road with 5 minutes or less on my drive clock and its only 7 or 8 am. Lemme tell ya, after two times on the 322 or 22 in southern PA, not a stop in sight, staying on the side of the road for 15-16 hours, i do not want to fall into that position again... Can someone help me understand that a little better? My trainer didn't really cover it very well unfortunately. I find it a little confusing still....

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

I'd like to rehash this subject if i may... I'm still having a tough time with the hours of service rules. I think i understand the drive nine hours idea, I'll be trying that. More times than not I've wound up over the past two weeks with 5 or. Six hours to get to my consignee , but an hour or so short on my clock. I've driven myself to the point where i am on the side of the road with 5 minutes or less on my drive clock and its only 7 or 8 am. Lemme tell ya, after two times on the 322 or 22 in southern PA, not a stop in sight, staying on the side of the road for 15-16 hours, i do not want to fall into that position again... Can someone help me understand that a little better? My trainer didn't really cover it very well unfortunately. I find it a little confusing still....

Honestly it depends on the situation. Learning how to manage your clock there are no right or wrong answers here. There are place you go to that you can guarentee will take FOREVER to unload you ie Shelbyville, IN Kroger just spent 8 1/2 hrs there. So either you are driving in off duty or doing an 8/2 like I did. If you need specific trip planning I can help you with that. Just shoot me a pm.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

David's Comment
member avatar

1 thing I do for my HOS , log what you do...

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

1 thing I do for my HOS , log what you do...

Yep Log what you do and do what you log. Follow that and you hardly ever go wrong.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

Could you have another driver with HoS left on his clock drive your truck to a safe place rather than be towed? Seems like a more cost efficient option?

Phil

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

This happen to me when I worked for central and my DM said that there is a one hour deal type thing like DOT really won't mess with you if its under a hour pass your 11 that's what my DM said not sure and also heard a trucker say it to

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ricky A.'s Comment
member avatar

Is it possible to go off duty while waiting at a shipper to conserve the hours?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Thumper's Comment
member avatar

I didn't read all the replies. That being said I ran a yard at an amazon for 2 years ending this past July. If a man was out of hours with electronic logs I told him he could stay in my bobtail lot. If he had paper logs I sent him 1.5 miles up the road to the truck stop.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Page 3 of 7 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Driver Responsibilities First Solo Months On The Road Hard Lessons Learned Life On The Road Logbook Questions Truck Driving Stories
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More