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Security Guard VS HoS

Topic 676 | Page 4

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Richard D.'s Comment
member avatar

Not to sound like a grump or anything but im going go be very blunt here. 5 years as an armed security officer and body guard. If the post orders tell me that nobody is allowed to park on property, im probably running you off and idc about your HOS issue, prob should have planned for it. Goodbyeeeee or im calling the police. Lol

Property rules and trespassing are really serious, theres no pity for an accidental HOS violator sadly

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

Not to sound like a grump or anything but im going go be very blunt here. 5 years as an armed security officer and body guard. If the post orders tell me that nobody is allowed to park on property, im probably running you off and idc about your HOS issue, prob should have planned for it. Goodbyeeeee or im calling the police. Lol

Property rules and trespassing are really serious, theres no pity for an accidental HOS violator sadly

First off if we show up on time and only have 3 hours of drive time and takes the company 4 hours to get us loaded not our fault. that's what appointments are for and that's why that company now has to pay for the driver to sit

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

I was told that running out of hours at a shipper is poor trip planing, but at the same time I was told to only plan for at most 2 hours at a shipper because at that point SWIFT gives detention pay. You really are screwed. My solution would be to call my DM and get info from them just to cover my butt.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jinx's Comment
member avatar

Now that is just messed up. Is it the case that even if you planned till you were blue in the face, you are still considered at fault even if it was the fault of the company? I am a new guy. But as I see it the options are limited and all of them are not good at all.

1. Find a place to shut down before you get to the shipper. So you can load/unload in the morning with a full clock and be VERY late. 2. Get the cops called on you for trespassing because they took to long to load/unload. 3. Drive illegal in clear violation of your HOS.

Seriously, what is a trucker to do? Warp time itself? Good luck with that.

What if it was a team truck? Couldn't the other driver just hop in the seat and get you to a place to shut down?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Snappy's Comment
member avatar

Not to sound like a grump or anything but im going go be very blunt here. 5 years as an armed security officer and body guard. If the post orders tell me that nobody is allowed to park on property, im probably running you off and idc about your HOS issue, prob should have planned for it. Goodbyeeeee or im calling the police. Lol

Property rules and trespassing are really serious, theres no pity for an accidental HOS violator sadly

Eight years of security here, including six years as a director over 14 line officers. My solution was always that the lot directly across the street was well-lit, less than a mile on the odometer, and just as safe as ours. Every once in a blue moon a driver would say he was out of hours. My reply was always that I could get a cop to come out and sort it out, since we had that Catch-22. No driver ever had a problem moving after that offer... never called a police officer as a result.

Now the one guy who always arrived at 3:00 to unload at 5, he got to stay. None of the other drivers were even delivering to us.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris M's Comment
member avatar

About 2 months ago I got to a shipper at 1 hour prior to my appointment time and was told there computers had crashed and they were behind as a result. I wound up being there 11 hours. I was in the sleeper the whole time so I got a reset but my point is that just saying if your hours run out then it was poor trip planning is very unfair.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah whoever thinks running out of hours is poor trip planning has absolutely no idea what they're talking about. Refrigerated shippers/receivers are infamous for taking a while to unload and there's always the unexpected.

Imagine this. You drive 6 hours to your reciever and deliver your load, your next load is 270 miles away and the appointment is today. So you drive 5 more hours and barely make it to your appointment on time. You just ran out of hours. How is that poor trip planning? You did great but that's just how your day went and you have to roll with it.

Also, calling your DM can be risky too. Remember, he can deny telling you anything over the phone but if you send a QC message then it's recorded. He could tell you to just drive and you'll get a violation. Next day Logs Departments will call you and ask you why. You'll tell them your DM told you to. Fearing for his job because he told a driver to do something illegal, he could easily deny it and now you're even more screwed.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Andy C.'s Comment
member avatar

Heh... Today was my day. Arrive at shipper , early too. Two and a half hours away from my delivery. Five hours left on my 14, sweet deal, time to drop hook, move on to next load. Well, shipper took their time. Ok. Two hours left on clock, I'll just cook over to flying j's forty minutes away. Not. After all said and done, I've got fifteen minutes left after being loaded. Long story. I am sitting in the dock door, an hour left on my ten reset. After sitting here for six, what's another four between friends? Lol . They are kool with it...

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Max E.'s Comment
member avatar

Threads like this make me happy I run paper logs.. however rumor is they are wanting to switch everyone to E logs. But who knows. Only time I wish I had E logs is when I'm adding up all my hours and figuring out resets and all that. That's a pain.

Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

They are going to make e-logs required soon IMO just to further regulate stuff...

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