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What did you do before becoming a truck driver?

Topic 7924 | Page 15

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Beth S.'s Comment
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I've been a Machinist for about 20 years in Houston, making parts for the Oil Industry. Did pretty well sometime and not so much other times, right now the Industry is completely died. I'm tired of the ups and mostly downs of my present career, I'm 49 years old and need some stability in my life. Trucking looks like exactly like what I'm looking for.

Everybody in west Texas seems to have forgotten about the bust part of the boom & bust cycle, but it's starting.

Brad P.'s Comment
member avatar

I have not started driving yet. I am scheduled to start my company driving school in November. I have been a car salesman for 6 yrs. I have drove local back when I was 18 yrs old and off and on through the yrs. I had to give up my CDL when I moved to Illinois because I did not have access to a tractor at the time. The reason for the decision to go OTR is that I am tired of having to deal with the public in a retail setting. The newer people working with me think I have a sign saying "Tell me your problems" on my office door. I just want to be out on the road and not having to talk or listen to anyones problem.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Well I worked as a secretary and then later an office manager.. so office work for about 10 years. Then I quit to go to college to become a registered respiratory therapist. Worked in hospitals in critical care and trauma for almost 20 years then got completely burned out on that. The last several years in healthcare, I worked travel contracts and that was enjoyable. Needed to settle down a while so i tried selling insurance for a while but really didn't have the capital to start my own agency and got tired of being cheated by a dishonest broker... not to mention the dirty old men.. some crazy stories there for sure. Took a job with Amazon just til I could figure out what's next.. training new employees etc. Still there and its ok most days, but anxious to get my cdl and get out of there lol. I grew up around trucks. my dad and my ex drove and owned trucks as did my stepfather. I always loved going out on the truck when I could escape from the hospital. I actually had my CDL-A permit about 15 years ago but never bothered getting the license as our trailers were always loaded and I was still enjoying health care at the time.

I'm 53 today actually and can't wait to get through with this class and get started on my next adventure.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jerry Escondido's Comment
member avatar

Some people were chiming in on Laura T.'s "I hate Nursing" topic about what they did before they became interested in trucking. I put the question in the title for others to tell what they did "before".

I taught middle school math and science for eleven years. Finally I "had it" with both student attitude and administration pressure to get my students to pass the annual testing.

Also, rookie truckers make just about as much as rookie teachers do, without all that college!

So, what did you do in your "previous life"?

Hi there Buddy, I started a threa he same as yours here by accident, Mea culpa. I just finished reading all of he posts here on your thread and one thing came to mind, diversity!! We truck drivers come from every walk of life. I have even heard of doctors, lawyers, engineers, CEOs of million dollar companies, Etc. that burned out on their first career and just wanted a change. I'll tell you what I think. With the combined strength, numbers, knowledge, and drive of truck drivers, there is nothing we could not accomplish. Think about that???

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jerry Escondido's Comment
member avatar

Some people were chiming in on Laura T.'s "I hate Nursing" topic about what they did before they became interested in trucking. I put the question in the title for others to tell what they did "before".

I taught middle school math and science for eleven years. Finally I "had it" with both student attitude and administration pressure to get my students to pass the annual testing.

Also, rookie truckers make just about as much as rookie teachers do, without all that college!

So, what did you do in your "previous life"?

Hi there Buddy, I started a threa he same as yours here by accident, Mea culpa. I just finished reading all of he posts here on your thread and one thing came to mind, diversity!! We truck drivers come from every walk of life. I have even heard of doctors, lawyers, engineers, CEOs of million dollar companies, Etc. that burned out on their first career and just wanted a change. I'll tell you what I think. With the combined strength, numbers, knowledge, and drive of truck drivers, there is nothing we could not accomplish. Think about that???

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rob S.'s Comment
member avatar

"With the combined strength, numbers, knowledge, and drive of truck drivers, there is nothing we could not accomplish. Think about that???"

Alrightee then, let's get that union formed so that we can make the same or more as truckers did in 1993, not less!

Oh and my story ... I've always loved trucks and I remember the first time I saw an American rig, I was mesmerized. For some reason I never pursued trucking until now. I was in the banking/investment industry since getting my B.A. degree. In the beginning it was exciting as I kept learning on the job, but over the last few years I realized that being stuck in an office for the rest of my life seems akin to being a zombie. I could slowly feel the life being drained out of me, I guess I need change. The only thing that generates any kind of buzz in me is trucking. I can't wait to get my license and hit the road. I plan on hauling cars in a few years.

The Shiva's Comment
member avatar

I was a warehouse manager for 9 years and have worked in warehouses for over 20 years

Kieran L.'s Comment
member avatar

Worked in retail sales and management, new car and truck sales, worked my way up in the restaurant business for many years doing nearly every job (dishwasher, delivery driver, server, cook, kitchen expediter, bartender, shift manager, general manager), warehouse work (hand loading/unloading tractor trailers on the docks all day), landscaping, waterscaping, automotive repair, IT/computer technician, automotive pinstriping, new home finishing work (installing fixtures, shelving, mirrors, blinds, etc.), and customer service/sales at a vaping (e-cig) shop.

I am not afraid of hard work, I crave adventure and changes of scenery, I always enjoyed traveling and driving and especially anytime I got paid to drive for some aspect of my job, so I figured getting paid to drive a truck all over the country would be fun! :)

Jerry Escondido's Comment
member avatar

Jesus you guys are young 1993 Brett? Damn I just realize how old I was. I was in special forces out of school came back from Nam, jumped in a truck with a friend who taught me how to drive the year was 1875, felt like it 1975, no schooling learned how to grind gears very well. Here one for you, I learned how to drive on a 18 speed double stick. Anyone know what that is? If so tell me, if you want to know ask me. Always been around these rigs, now I own some and repair large construction equipment and cranes up to 400 tons, well I do not my guys do, I just run the place. Most repairs are handled by insurance companies so getting paid is no problem.

Yes I do. We called them suicide tranny here in southern California. I remember having to reach through the steering wheel to shift the front tranny stick with left hand and then shift rear tranny with right hand. Was a pain in the a*% when trying to shift in a turn.

Jerry Escondido's Comment
member avatar

Jesus you guys are young 1993 Brett? Damn I just realize how old I was. I was in special forces out of school came back from Nam, jumped in a truck with a friend who taught me how to drive the year was 1875, felt like it 1975, no schooling learned how to grind gears very well. Here one for you, I learned how to drive on a 18 speed double stick. Anyone know what that is? If so tell me, if you want to know ask me. Always been around these rigs, now I own some and repair large construction equipment and cranes up to 400 tons, well I do not my guys do, I just run the place. Most repairs are handled by insurance companies so getting paid is no problem.

Yes I do. We called them suicide tranny here in southern California. I remember having to reach through the steering wheel to shift the front tranny stick with left hand and then shift rear tranny with right hand. Was a pain in the a*% when trying to shift in a turn.

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