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What did you do before becoming a truck driver?

Topic 7924 | Page 18

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Tom L.'s Comment
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60 years old. Starting CDL school Dec 14th. I am in excellent health still work out etc.

Background: IT/Accounting professional ERP and CRM software system implementation for 25 years. Career was "offshored". Became mortgage originator just prior to the "Great Recession" Ooops.

Hoping to find company that will appreciate my clean driving record etc. and allow me to be home weekends!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
TreeTheTrucker's Comment
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I was/still am, a certified motorcycle mechanic.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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well, since this is the proper thread to post it, I just copied this from Mr. Escondido's thread, because I am just too lazy to type any more today.

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1) Where do all these folks come from?

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Born in Caro, MI, raised in Midland, MI ... I have lived in Grand Haven, MI, Highpoint, NC, Bay City, MI, Harlan, IA, and now West Columbia, SC

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2) What did they do before?

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I received an associates degree in General Studies, basically because I had no clue what I wanted to do, and didn't want to waste more money on college. Eventually, after finding my niche as rave DJ, I spent my late teens, and my 20's being paid to party, but I burnt out. Then I found my love for cooking, and became a chef, obtaining a degree in Hospitality Management. I have had the pleasure of working all aspects of jobs, in hotels, and restaurants. I have tried my hand at opening my own business, which ultimately led me to my current disposition. But damn, it was sure a helluva fun ride!

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3) Why on earth would any sane person want to be a Truck Driver? Think about it, life on the road, living out of your truck, away from family and friends, driver managers, shippers, dock workers, scales, highway patrol, and the worst, 4 wheelers.

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When I was 8 my parents took us on a cross country trip, on a lot of route 66, then up through California, and back. I remember being fascinated with the giant trucks, and everytime I did the "pull the horn sign" at a trucker, I was rewarded with a blast of the coolest sounding horn, ever! Truck drivers became my heroes. At every rest stop I would ask the first one I found, what it was like, and, I was regaled with some great stories of the trucking life. Ever since then, i knew that I would eventually drive a truck. In 2005, I did my research, or so I thought, and went to Tri Area Driving School, with pre-hires to several companies, USA Truck was my top choice. But even after I double check at the Secretary of State, when I walked in to do my test for the permit, I was denied, because I had to have been 3 years separated from my last suspension. I still had 8 more months before I could try again. I would have gone back, but I found a good job, elsewhere, and eventually it went onto the back burner again. So now, here I am.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Clyff A.'s Comment
member avatar

Was a professionally trained chef mostly fine dining specializing in French cuisine did that for about 10 years

Then I was a railroad conductor (Got laid off)

Then went back to cooking and was promptly reminded why I got out of it

So I tried out doing track maintenence for the railroad (got laid off again big surprise ha)

And now I'm doing this

Sunrise Driver's Comment
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I was a Mortgage underwriter and been in the Mortgage and lending business for 18 years. Made good money but once the economy took an arrow to knee so did the housing market. Got tired of the lay offs!

Bucket's Comment
member avatar

Great thread Errol, was wondering if one for (who you drive for, & what you haul) dry van , flatbed, reefer , etc. Just would like to know!

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Dixie Rose (Vicki)'s Comment
member avatar

I currently work as a cashier for the big W. I am also in grad school. Before that did customer service, fast food, homemaker, security etc. The whole jack of all trades master of none. My husband has been in the food industry since high school. He is burned out, I can see that so this is going to be a great way to refresh him. Glad to see that we are not alone in this and our new family is just as diverse as can be.

Jodi 's Comment
member avatar

I had 20 years in custom cabinets and granite countertops. Had a handy man business for about 5 years of that but the call of the open road was to much finally. I figured if this turns out not to be for me I can go back to woodworking. I made good money doing it and still have all tools so won't be hard to get back into it if needed.

Errol V.'s Comment
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This thread is for anyone signed on to TT. If you go back a page or two you should find a talley of everyone who has responded. We have quite a community here!

ChickieMonster's Comment
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I started at 16 in food service as a waitress. Worked a lot of fast food jobs, was a cook at a nursing home for awhile, and considered going to culinary school but decided that would just take all the joy out of it. I worked as a customer service rep for a major cell phone carrier and did various receptionist jobs. About 4 years ago, I rekindled my love for cars and all things with wheels and took a job selling auto parts (which I loved but the pay just wasn't there).

Most recently I worked for a major company that re-manufacturers engines and transmissions. I started out machining crankshafts until a shoulder injury nixed that. I then moved to rebuilding torque converters, then to rebuilding transmissions. I built Toyota, Ford, and Dodge transmissions. I absolutely loved this job and was trained in multiple areas, but it didn't work out for me.

After that I took a temp job putting sheet metal on the outside of rebuilt soda machines. After getting laid off 3 weeks before Christmas and having to go on unemployment I realized I really needed some schooling for a career. I looked into going to school for healthcare administration and management, but I didn't have 18 months to spare! My husband and I had tossed around the idea of driving a truck for years but always with him driving! He is disabled now and won't be able to drive so after seeing an ad in the local paper for CDL school I decided to take the plunge! Here I am 3 months later getting ready to go on the road with my trainer! It's been a crazy, nerve wracking, roller coaster of a ride but I honestly believe I am gonna love this new life!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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