I Am Poison To Most Trucking Companies

Topic 9054 | Page 2

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Sun King's Comment
member avatar

IF you really think that trucking companies can do no wrong, then you are in the wrong industry

Everybody makes mistakes Patrick, even myself. So do the companies, so does everyone who is human. It is how we deal with the situation that determines whether the outcome is helpful to oneself or harmful.

Can you change the actions of a company? No. Can you change how you handle dealing with said company? Yes.

Answers are found within the choices one makes.

Getting someone else or a company to change is pretty fruitless.

In all serious Patrick. I hope you find a solution.

That's an emphasis on you.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't believe you are asking these kinds of questions. I trusted the doctor completely until the next day when I called the X-ray technician. I had the injury cranking the landing gear up on the second day of work. When the X-ray technician told me that the X-rays were all clear, I then checked the Texas Medical Board to see the doctors credentials. I then discovered 10 years of disciplinary actions against the doctor for alcoholism and drug addiction. Then I looked up the medication he prescribed for me, and read that people who are allergic to penicilin should NOT take it. I specifically noted on my papers when I filled out the forms that I was allergic to penicilin. And as far as who is my trainer, the entire matter was right in front of me, and so was the blatant lack of decision making ability. Don't ask me ignorant questions. Workman's comp should have known the history of the doctors it sends drivers to.

I apologize for my lack of tact. That's the old claims brain kicking in - a work comp claim early in employment is always a red flag, that's all I was trying to say. 98% of the time, the injuries are legit, but the folks who work the system often "get injured" early on, so it draws more attention than a claim by someone who has been employed there for years without previous incidents.

So, if you find out after the fact that this work comp doctor is questionable, there are a number of things you can do . . . but quitting the company over it makes no sense. They don't hire the doctor, their insurer does. You could've gone back to the company and told them what you found out, and said, "Hey, guys, I really want to get back to work, but I have some questions about this doc that the insurance company sent me to. Here's what happened and here's what I found out. Is there anything you can do to help me get a different doctor?"

In the second case, you haven't made clear whether it was the trainer you objected to, or just that they hemmed and hawed on the decision. Did you have any input on this process, or were you just a bystander who got told something different five times? If it was the trainer, why couldn't you simply ask if there was someone else available?

It's interesting that they let you see them change their minds five times - that's poor management technique on someone's part - but I don't see it as a reason to quit the company. Once you've jumped through the hoops, boom! You're out on a truck making money, and the main relationship you have to manage is your dispatcher. Even if it was your dispatcher that couldn't decide, that is not a reason to quit. Some of us could even find ways to make that work to our advantage.

So again, I'm not going to agree with you that these were good reasons to quit. They simply aren't. There were other things you could have done to make those situations better, but you chose to quit. No one "made you" quit. You decided to take that course, and now the consequences of that bad decision are biting you in the ass. Own it. Stop blaming other people. It's all on you, and no one else, and until you can admit that, I don't see how any of us are going to be able to help you.

Despite my sharp tongue, I really want to help you. But first we have to deal with the real issue, and in this case, the real issue is you have quit eight jobs in two years. It's not the companies or the doctor or anyone else that can be blamed for that, it's you who are to blame. It sucks when you first figure out that you've made a mess of your plans, but until you swallow that pill, you're going to have a hard time.

Also, you need to stop lying. A good start will be to tell the truth about yourself. Your profile says you are 25, but another thread says you drove back in the early 2000s. How did you get a license when you were not even a teenager?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Patrick, please clarify: you called the x-ray technician? The person who took the x-rays? You should have spoken with the workman's comp Dr. (Even as a drug addicted alcoholic, he's the Attending Dr.) Or at least the radiologist.

As for your trainer, 5 trainers in 12 hours. Considering how fast you burn through companies that did hire (then fire) you, maybe each of them quickly decided they might be wasting their time.

In all of your postings here, Pat, you never allowed as to making a mistake. You have asked about special situations (glare of lights at night) of things not connected to doing your job (Trucker Churches). In five months that I've been active on TT, I have seen many entries by people who say "the company got it all wrong", but these people fail to realize the problem might be within themselves.

A famous Teacher once said, "Don't complain about the speck in someone's eye when you can't see the plank in your own!"

Patrick 's Comment
member avatar

I told the company about this doctor and they did not care. And when SRT changed their minds in front of me 5 times, that tells me they are not reputable. I did not quit from SRT, I was sent home because of my sarcastic remarks about their decision making abilities. They changed me from solo, to 100 hours with a trainer, to 50 hours with a trainer, to 3 loads with a local driver, to two loads out with a local driver, to 1 load out............and that is when I verbally questioned their managements ability to make decisions in a supposedly legitimate company. They did not like my comments and sent me home. But allow me to give you two other examples: The first company was CR England after I passed my CDL test in July 2013. They teamed me up with a trainer who was verbally abusive. I attempted to call my supervisor to ask for another trainer, and was told they had no other trainers and did not know when they would have another one available. I was stuck on the truck for another week and began having anxiety attacks due to his verbal abuse and yelling at me. I got sick and they sent me home. That is when Schneider called me and said they would hire me as a solo driver. I was with them one week when my wife was rushed to the hospital and was diagnosed with stage 3 kidney disease and neuropathy. The doctor wanted me to come of the road and help my wife. And my wife has priority over anything else. Neither one of these were MY fault. In fact the next company was USA Truck and after 5 weeks with a trainer he showed signs of a mental breakdown and I had to report him to safety, and they were very appreciative I reported him. But they took so long getting me a new trainer that Celadon called me and told me they would hire me without a trainer.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Patrick 's Comment
member avatar

Whoever the famous teacher was, I think he was mentally ill.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
I did not quit from SRT, I was sent home because of my sarcastic remarks about their decision making abilities.

My work is done here.
smile.gif

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Whoever the famous teacher was, I think he was mentally ill.

Actually, he had the only truly sound mind of anyone who has walked the earth.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

I told the company about this doctor and they did not care. And when SRT changed their minds in front of me 5 times, that tells me they are not reputable. I did not quit from SRT, I was sent home because of my sarcastic remarks about their decision making abilities. They changed me from solo, to 100 hours with a trainer, to 50 hours with a trainer, to 3 loads with a local driver, to two loads out with a local driver, to 1 load out............and that is when I verbally questioned their managements ability to make decisions in a supposedly legitimate company. They did not like my comments and sent me home. But allow me to give you two other examples: The first company was CR England after I passed my CDL test in July 2013. They teamed me up with a trainer who was verbally abusive. I attempted to call my supervisor to ask for another trainer, and was told they had no other trainers and did not know when they would have another one available. I was stuck on the truck for another week and began having anxiety attacks due to his verbal abuse and yelling at me. I got sick and they sent me home. That is when Schneider called me and said they would hire me as a solo driver. I was with them one week when my wife was rushed to the hospital and was diagnosed with stage 3 kidney disease and neuropathy. The doctor wanted me to come of the road and help my wife. And my wife has priority over anything else. Neither one of these were MY fault. In fact the next company was USA Truck and after 5 weeks with a trainer he showed signs of a mental breakdown and I had to report him to safety, and they were very appreciative I reported him. But they took so long getting me a new trainer that Celadon called me and told me they would hire me without a trainer.

OK, two weren't your fault. I'll give you that. Still not giving you the first two. Obviously you recovered from your injuries, so the doctor is out as an excuse, and he's not an employee of the company, so it's still not a reason to quit if the company "didn't care," whatever that actually looked like. And I probably would have let you go after the sarcastic remarks, too. You were a new driver. I wouldn't want sarcastic commentary on how I run my business from someone who's been there a few days, and neither would you if you were in their position.

What about the other four? Can you whittle it down below six jobs in two years?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Wait, USA Truck is off the hook too. You didn't want to wait. Not a valid reason for quitting unless it was some truly unreasonable amount of time. So what about the other three?

Patrick 's Comment
member avatar

O.K. here goes. And to Errol V. it sounds like you are talking about that Jesus person, and I don't need the religious garbage. There other four and why I left them. Celadon- I was an owner operator with them and loved it. A brand new truck just weeks old. I drove for about a month and after one home time, I developed a depth perception problem while still in San Antonio. I informed my dispatcher and he told me to see my doctor, which I did that same day. My doctor fixed the problem, which was nothing more than a large buildup of wax that was effecting my depth perception. However the doctor refused to sign a medical release until I saw a specialist. My insurance had a deductible that I could not afford, so I was left unemployed. My doctor asked me if I could borrow the money from family or friends, for the specialist, and I told him that I did not have family or friends. Neither did my wife. Covenant Transport--I was with a team driver and we got along great, and then on one 30 minute DOT break I went into a truck stop to get a snack and as I was returning to the truck I slipped on some dirt near a tree, and strained my spine. Workman's comp sent me to a doctor in Gallup, N.M. and he said I needed a day of recover from the strain. Then for some reason Covenant decided that they wanted me to fly to Chattanooga to see another doctor. When I did my strain had already had time to heal, and I went back to see how to meet up with my truck to get with all my belongings. THEN I was brought into a conference room to be questioned about the circumstances surrounding the accident, which I completely understood. HOWEVER, they not only questioned me about the incident, they also questioned me about my job history, my marriage and my relationship with my wife, which I told them was non of their f......king business. I guess they did not appreciate my language because I was sent home. Navajo was the last company I worked for, and when I was finished with home time after being out for 3 weeks, I had a sudden loss of 70% of my hearing and informed the dispatcher. I saw my doctor and he sent me to a specialist, but that appointment wasn't for 2 weeks, so that ended my employment with Navajo because they towed the truck away. The specialist gave me a prescription and in just 3 days my hearing was completely restored. I found out it was due to an inflammation in my inner ear due to having the flu. However, when I faxed all the documentation to Navajo with the doctors letter and everything, they said I was not rehireable. I still don't know why.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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