Trucking Takes Commitment

Topic 9225 | Page 3

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Chris the stick slinger's Comment
member avatar
"Now if you had stayed with the first company and gotten in that same fender bender they would have likely kept you. Why? Because for one they've already invested a lot of time and money training you and they'd like to recoup that money. For two, you have some experience there and hopefully you've shown good potential so they still believe in you."

Exactly my story Brett. Tail whipped a Silverado in a parking lot and was basically forgiven.

Except I managed to make it about 96 days into my career. Thank goodness for a company who understands that mistakes can happen and trusting me to do my best not to make them again.

Haven't really looked at it quite like you so eloquently put it Brett. As someone really opposed to it you have opened my eyes to company sponsored training.

.02

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

"Now if you had stayed with the first company and gotten in that same fender bender they would have likely kept you. Why? Because for one they've already invested a lot of time and money training you and they'd like to recoup that money. For two, you have some experience there and hopefully you've shown good potential so they still believe in you."

double-quotes-end.png

Exactly my story Brett. Tail whipped a Silverado in a parking lot and was basically forgiven.

Except I managed to make it about 96 days into my career. Thank goodness for a company who understands that mistakes can happen and trusting me to do my best not to make them again.

Haven't really looked at it quite like you so eloquently put it Brett. As someone really opposed to it you have opened my eyes to company sponsored training.

.02

See, now imagine you had left the first company after two months and got in that fender bender one month into your second job. You could easily have been fired from the second company and would not have been rehired by the first company. Not only that, but you would owe a ton of tuition to the first company for quitting before your contract was up and you'd have one heck of a time finding that third job. Talk about a whole different story! Instead you're cruising along just fine, gaining more experience with your first company.

Company-Sponsored Training is an awesome opportunity but most people don't understand the nature of it. It's more like a tryout than it is a school. You're constantly being monitored and tested, whether you realize it or not, to make sure you're putting in the time and effort the company expects. These companies want to help people get their career off to a great start but a lot of students that show up simply do not have their heart in it. They go in skeptical, lazy, or simply underestimate how difficult the task at hand really is.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

The Dude's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

"Now if you had stayed with the first company and gotten in that same fender bender they would have likely kept you. Why? Because for one they've already invested a lot of time and money training you and they'd like to recoup that money. For two, you have some experience there and hopefully you've shown good potential so they still believe in you."

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Exactly my story Brett. Tail whipped a Silverado in a parking lot and was basically forgiven.

Except I managed to make it about 96 days into my career. Thank goodness for a company who understands that mistakes can happen and trusting me to do my best not to make them again.

Haven't really looked at it quite like you so eloquently put it Brett. As someone really opposed to it you have opened my eyes to company sponsored training.

.02

double-quotes-end.png

See, now imagine you had left the first company after two months and got in that fender bender one month into your second job. You could easily have been fired from the second company and would not have been rehired by the first company. Not only that, but you would owe a ton of tuition to the first company for quitting before your contract was up and you'd have one heck of a time finding that third job. Talk about a whole different story! Instead you're cruising along just fine, gaining more experience with your first company.

Company-Sponsored Training is an awesome opportunity but most people don't understand the nature of it. It's more like a tryout than it is a school. You're constantly being monitored and tested, whether you realize it or not, to make sure you're putting in the time and effort the company expects. These companies want to help people get their career off to a great start but a lot of students that show up simply do not have their heart in it. They go in skeptical, lazy, or simply underestimate how difficult the task at hand really is.

Do you just naturally wake up at 4 a.m. to begin the day and start writing great 200 word replies to posts?

I'm in Reno and it's 1 a.m. after a very long day so I have an excuse to be up!

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Do you just naturally wake up at 4 a.m. to begin the day and start writing great 200 word replies to posts?

I'm in Reno and it's 1 a.m. after a very long day so I have an excuse to be up!

rofl-3.gif Yap. I've always liked getting up real early and I'm the type that jumps out of bed and hits the ground running.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Do you just naturally wake up at 4 a.m. to begin the day and start writing great 200 word replies to posts?

I'm in Reno and it's 1 a.m. after a very long day so I have an excuse to be up!

double-quotes-end.png

rofl-3.gif Yap. I've always liked getting up real early and I'm the type that jumps out of bed and hits the ground running.

Age is starting to creep up on you, that won't last for long!

rofl-2.gifshocked.png

classA's Comment
member avatar

Thank you, Old School.

The truth of your post stirred encouragement in me today.

As a rookie I have learned many things about the Truth of Trucking. Some of it has been rather trying. Especially this last week. And the last few days bouncing around the LA freeways had about discouraged me greatly.

I should be on my way home today, but I am sitting at a Company OC in French Camp, CA just beginning a 34-hr restart so I can even go towards home. The last few days alone I have driven literal thousands of miles to, from, and in the LA area.

Spent hours calculating ETA and NAT for loads that never happened pimarily due to no empty trailers.

All the while I have been reminding dispatch where I am, what my HOS are available and how important it is for me to get home. And what do they do? Send me repeatedly to LA for 3 days only to learn that what they wanted to do in theory was not possible. I could see it, why couldn't they?

Thankfully, since I could see this coming 2 days ago and as you stated,, already had determined in myself that I was going to honor my end of the agreement - drive to meet their needs. Even though it had cost me HOS, made me miss my scheduled home time, and been very frustrating, I have stuck it out. And I actually now feel better.

Now, to remembet it the next time I am sitting for the biggest part of 2 days at truck stops awaiting an assignment.

Likewise, I will have to remember my commitment to my meetiing the financial needs of my home.

Thank you again.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I'm bumping this up so more people can read this.

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