Profile For B. Scott

B. Scott's Info

  • Location:
    OR

  • Driving Status:
    Rookie Solo Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    4 years, 8 months ago

B. Scott's Bio

Certified Welder/fabricator/mechanic/gal friday in a truck shop for a helicopter company. Now a CDL A, Tanker, Combo, Air brakes and HAZMAT endorsed driver as well (THANK YOU TRUCKING TRUTH!)

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Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

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Just passed my CDL pre trip and driving test

Congrats!

That deserves one of these....

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Congrats! I hope to be saying the same thing in a couple of weeks!

Thanks guys:)

Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

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Just passed my CDL pre trip and driving test

I'm really happy, the only trailer in our fleet that isn't placarded is a 48' flat bed with a 10' spread axle and I was worried I would end up jumping a curb or over shoot the alley dock, but I got it. Not a perfect score (87%), I think if I had gone through a driving school I could have scored higher, but I'm still happy all the same!

Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

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Just passed my CDL pre trip and driving test

Just passed my CDL pre trip and driving test. Would have never made it this far if I hadn't used the High Road Training Program. Thank you!

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

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Hazard lights at railroad crossings

Here is the info from the PA CDL Manual

RaIlRoad CrossIng Before reaching the crossing, all commercial drivers should: • decelerate, brake smoothly and shift gears as necessary. • Look and listen for the presence of trains. • check traffic in all directions. do not stop, change gears, pass another vehicle or change lanes while any part of your vehicle is in the crossing. If you are driving a bus, a school bus or a vehicle displaying placards, you should be prepared to observe the following procedures at every railroad crossing (unless the crossing is exempt): • As the vehicle approaches a railroad crossing, activate the 4-way flashers. • Stop the vehicle within 50 feet but not less than 15 feet from the nearest rail. • Listen and look in both directions along the track for an approaching train and for signals indicating the approach of a train. If operating a bus, you may also be required to open the window and door prior to crossing the tracks. • Keep hands on the steering wheel as the vehicle crosses the tracks. • do not stop, change gears or change lanes while any part of your vehicle is proceeding across the tracks. • Four-way flashers should be deactivated after the vehicle crosses the tracks.

Awesome! Thank you Tman, This is the information I was looking for!

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

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Hazard lights at railroad crossings

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Also if you have only a permit you should not be driving with a Hazmat you only get a Hazmat when you apply and send in fingerprints and and pass your final road test not to mention written test at the DMV its a Homeland Security Background check and that would be my evidence since I got a Hazmat cost about $160 I hope your not driving without one and your hauling Jet A fuel you get caught you can kiss your permit goodbye and get a hefty fine and probably lose your chance at getting your license for quite sometime dont mean to be so harsh but tell your company you might save them some money

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Thank you for the quick response. No, I'm not driving any HAZMAT vehicles personally yet, just a flatbed with air brakes. Like I said, I've heard people say that hazard lights need to be on, but I haven't been able to find anywhere that actually says I have to do it. Doesn't cost me anything to throw the switch, I was just wondering if it was actually required.

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In the training program offered by this site. It has all the details for hasmat loads. I would suggest studying it. It will only help give you the right info. Operate as if you are in the strictest state at all times. It will only help you be safer. Other drivers info may be wrong, its not always their intent to be wrong. Information just get twisted. One of my highschool teachers taught us this by telling the first person in the class the homework assignment. When it got to the end it was way off. He didn't warn the class on what he was doing. It started as a 500 word essay on a historical figure of your choice. It ended by being a 600 word essay with historical significants. As being the last one to hear this.....my simple thought was WTF!? Still remember that to this day as how information can get twisted without someones intention to twist it.

I have used the highroad twice- the first time I got my HAZMAT endorsement- as well as my permit, tanker, combo, and air brakes. The second time after they lapsed. It is not mentioned in the HAZMAT section, but it also warns "The hazardous material transportation information in this section reflects all revisions as of October 2009. This section contains partial information relative to the hazardous material requirements. The purpose of this section is to prepare an individual for the CDL hazardous material test. It should not be used for the hazardous material recurrent training. For detailed hazardous material transportation information, consult the regulations."

I agree with what you've said about viva voce which is why I came directly to the place where the pros are. I didn't know if it had been updated since 2009 or if it may have been something that was not covered in this partial review. I didn't read anything about it in my states manual either, it was a curiosity and I thought maybe someone on this site would have a definitive yes or no with proof as to weather this was required, a common practice, or if anyone had even heard of it at all. I suppose I'll look up the regulations, but I suspect, given the lack of proof, that throwing hazard lights sits somewhere between "common practice" and "never heard of it".

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

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Hazard lights at railroad crossings

Hazard lights are to warn traffic behind you, that you are coming to a stop (thereby CREATING a hazard yourself). HM loads and Passenger (bus) both seem to be required to do this.

Wisconsin, Texas and other states I've taken a cursory look at - call for a 60 day suspension for railroad grade violations. Wisconsin mentions something of the order of 3 YEARS if you're carrying HM in a CMV.

Interestingly enough - the "hazard lights requirement", is NOT actually spelled out in FMCSA 392.10, which is the regulation regarding railroad crossings.

So -I honestly couldn't say if the hazard lights are truly a LEGAL REQUIREMENT - none of the states I've look at actually had it IN THE STATUTE (and it isn't spelled out specifically in 392.10.

On the other hand, every bus and placarded vehicle I've seen at a RR X-ing DOES IT (hazards), it was taught to do it at the county CDL school I attended - so I would treat it as GOSPEL ANYWAY (whether or not you can be cited for it).

Here's an interesting booklet from Operation Lifesaver on Highway-Rail Grade Crossing Training for Professional Truck Drivers, that covers CMV Railroad Crossings - which also doesn't mention hazard lights.

Help this helps, though my research and the lack of statutes/regs specifically mentioning hazard lights lead me to believe it's not part of any regulation/law - but I'd advise using them anyway in the case of placarded HM loads and Passenger Buses.

Regards,

Rick

Thank you Rick, that was very insightful

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Hazard lights at railroad crossings

I believe any hazmat load, you stop at R/R crossing, toss 4 ways on listen for any sound of train, and then proceed on.

Thank you for the quick reply David

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Hazard lights at railroad crossings

Also if you have only a permit you should not be driving with a Hazmat you only get a Hazmat when you apply and send in fingerprints and and pass your final road test not to mention written test at the DMV its a Homeland Security Background check and that would be my evidence since I got a Hazmat cost about $160 I hope your not driving without one and your hauling Jet A fuel you get caught you can kiss your permit goodbye and get a hefty fine and probably lose your chance at getting your license for quite sometime dont mean to be so harsh but tell your company you might save them some money

Thank you for the quick response. No, I'm not driving any HAZMAT vehicles personally yet, just a flatbed with air brakes. Like I said, I've heard people say that hazard lights need to be on, but I haven't been able to find anywhere that actually says I have to do it. Doesn't cost me anything to throw the switch, I was just wondering if it was actually required.

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Hazard lights at railroad crossings

Where I work has a lot of differing opinions about what is and is not correct and being very new to this (only have my permit), I've been trying to weed through some of the opinion and get to the facts.

Which leads me to this question: Are HAZMAT tankers (JET-A specifically) required to use their hazard lights when they come to a stop at a railroad? I had one driver tell me that if you don't you can have your license pulled for 6 months and while I've been trying to google it nothing has come up.

Any of the pros on here have the real answer with evidence to back it up? Thank you in advance :)

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