Comments By ButtonUp

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  • ButtonUp
  • Joined:
  • 9 years, 7 months ago
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Posted:  7 years, 9 months ago

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Thinking about driving a big rig but don't want to live on the road forever?

I think the bottom line is that for individuals who possess the determination and ability, and are qualified with respect to health, driving, and legal histories, there are many options in the trucking industry besides living in a truck for months at a time. That's why I started... A lot of it depends on where you live, or are willing to relocate to, but the opportunities are there, as many of us here can verify since we're working home daily gigs.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Are you really sure that this is what you want?

I would never.encourage anyone to quit, but those that can't stick it out and make the necessary adjustments that DO quit probably made the roads safer by doing so.

As for training, I remember how scared I was riding with my first trainer, so the thought of trying to sleep while a new student is driving is terrifying. The additional danger pay would have to be quite substantial to entice me.

Hats off to Red Gator!

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Can't get hired...

Were these accidents in your personal vehicle?

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Pre-Trip Inspection - My Way! A must see!

Wish there was something like this when I was in CDL School!

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Getting very frustrated...

The peterbilt and kenworth are similar... Try turning the cruise on, then press set, then hold resume for a second or so. if it has a cummins i set it at 1000 because the manual said if idling for long periods to be at least 1000 rpm.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Getting very frustrated...

What kind of truck do you have? There are some tricks that work on some trucks. For instance, in the international and kenworth I could turn the cruise on and bump it up a little and it would run constantly. If you're hooked to a trailer you can try setting your trailer brakes and releasing the tractor brakes. Be sure to test the brakes well beforehand.

I still haven't figured out how to keep my Volvo running...

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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I passed my road test!!!!!

Awesome!

Yeah, when it happens...

... it happens FAST!

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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CB Radio

I have thought about putting a sideband radio in the rig, but honestly I don't know how much I would really use it. I use the CB in the truck to mainly keep track of local stuff, although I have had some long conversations with drivers going the same way, or taking the same detour. If I wanted to do some long distance work I would put one of my amateur radios in there, but I am afraid that would be too distracting.

Something to think about!

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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CB Radio

Yeah, for the times it comes in handy it's worth having. I was in Florida as a new trainee and saw a 5 or 6 car pileup when a heavy utility pickup entered the highway too fast and slid into a car causing a chain reaction right in front of our truck. What is it with the drivers down there? Sounds worse than Houston. The CB couldn't have helped avoid that situation, but it definitely let the drivers behind us know what was ahead of them.

I will be taking my son out with me for the first time soon, and that's one of the things that bugs me a little is some of the language on the radio. He is old enough he's heard it before, but it's still sad that you've got all the radio Rambos mucking up the airwaves. But, you hear it anywhere there's people nowadays it seems. Can't even eat a meal at a restaurant without hearing the f*bomb.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Leaving for Swift school this Sunday in Corsicana Texas.

Hey there. I used to live in Spring. Don't get a lot of winter weather there, do ya? I think it was in '95, maybe '96 that winter it got below freezing and everyone freaked out lol! The traffic signals were hanging down into the intersections, trees were touching the ground from the weight of the ice. I lived there from new years day '95 to about march of '99.

Are you going to school locally, or somewhere there's going to be actual winter weather?

If you've lived there all your life and haven't dealt with snow and the like, you actually might be better off in that you'll be more likely to take it slow and easy, and not have the bravado a lot of drivers have from dealing with winter weather all their lives that ends up leaving them in the ditch, or heaven forbid, killing someone.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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High road training

just wondering,is there a time limit for using the program on this fantastic site,I`m going to get my permit in 3 months,I want to get all of my endorsements in the same month,so I`m planning on studying all of them for that time period. thank you everyone

I've been driving now 2.5 years and I still get on the training program sometimes, so you shouldn't have a problem.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Mountain Driving Without Engine Brake

...which also makes me realize that although I had remembered the basics of UP HIGH / DOWN LOW, I was incorrect in stating you wanted the power to pull uphill and the torque downhill... it's about having enough room to accelerate downhill if you need to whilst NOT being in the high torque range, and being above torque range going uphill.

Also, when I said...

" As for dry roads, it doesn't seem to matter what the rpm's are, you just want to be in a low enough gear. If you are heavy enough you are going to use the brakes."

... this is in regard to NOT using the JAKE brake. Higher RPM does affect the jake brake.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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CB Radio

If the oil fields didn't make us have one.. I probably wouldn't use it. Lucky for me I'm never on channel 19. Oil fields do different channels. We just have to have them because a lot of our back roads are barely wide enough for one truck.. got to know when the road is open. Hahahah

That's some real truckin' lol! And sounds like you're going to be doing the winter road version as well. Good luck man! Doubt you need more hair on your chest but sounds like you're gettin' it!

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Mountain Driving Without Engine Brake

Here's a few things from the winter driving handbook I got in CDL school:

Before going down a grade in winter...

Make sure the power divider (axle lock) is released going downhill. A free rolling wheel that is not receiving power or braking is less likely to slide.

Select a speed and gear that gives you the ability to go slow enough to stay in control and yet have the ability should you need it to let off the brakes or accelerate slightly to pull a sliding trailer back in behind you.

The important question is where are your RPM? Are they high in the range or low in the range? This is what you need to know when you are going down a grade. Once you are at a safe, manageable speed, then you need to think about whether or not you have torque.

You have high torque in the low to mid rpm range, and high horsepower in the high rpm. If you are in the high torque range, you have the ability to PULL, so if the trailer happened to get out of line and you were in high rpm the only thing you could do to speed up and get out in front of the trailer would be to upshift, and you would not want to upshift if your trailer is trying to push you off the road. If you push in the clutch to shift at this point, or brake, you lose the pull on your trailer and can make the trailer skid worse. That is why when going down a grade you keep your RPM in the mid range so you always have the ability to pull when you need it without having to upshift. Be careful not to go too low (below approximately 1000 rpm) in the torque range when going downhill with a heavy load as this could also cause a skid. Some engines have a lower torque range so make sure to look at the manual for the vehicle you are driving.

Going Uphill

In order to understand the proper technique for going up grades on a slick road, you first need to know what causes a drive axle skid. This is the most common type of skid drivers experience when pulling a slick grade. When you understand what CAUSES it, then learning how to PREVENT it will make more sense.

To prevent a drive axle skid you need to stay out of the torque range when going up a grade. To stay out of the torque range, keep RPM high. When going uphill, staying high in the RPM range also helps to keep your engine from overheating by allowing it to draw air through the radiator and cool.

Remember these techniques by thinking UP HIGH and DOWN LOW.

At first it may feel funny pulling a grade at high RPM. However, you are using that extra fuel to prevent an accident. It is a very small price to pay for the benefit.

Ok I won't copy the whole thing. I should mention that different engines have different no load governed rpm's, but the rpm's used in the example showed about 1400 being in the torque range and downshifting before going up the grade to maintain about 1800 rpm.

I hadn't read this since school, so I didn't remember the exact rpm's it mentioned. I usually maintain about 1500-1600 going uphill, so I might have to change that. The main thing is that you want to be in control of your vehicle, whatever that means for the individual driver.

As for dry roads, it doesn't seem to matter what the rpm's are, you just want to be in a low enough gear. If you are heavy enough you are going to use the brakes.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Mountain Driving Without Engine Brake

double-quotes-start.png

I disagree, you want low rpm going uphill. There's a much greater chance of sliding and/or losing control climbing a mountain with high rpm.

double-quotes-end.png

So what you're saying is that at lower rpm's with more torque and less horsepower you're more likely to break loose?

I just want to make sure I am understanding you correctly as it is totally opposite what I have read and was taught in driving school.

I got that backward... It should be So what you're saying is that at lower rpm's with more torque and less horsepower you're less likely to break loose?

I didn't catch it on the preview...

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Mountain Driving Without Engine Brake

I disagree, you want low rpm going uphill. There's a much greater chance of sliding and/or losing control climbing a mountain with high rpm.

So what you're saying is that at lower rpm's with more torque and less horsepower you're more likely to break loose?

I just want to make sure I am understanding you correctly as it is totally opposite what I have read and was taught in driving school.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Truckers Health

I've seen bikes and such strapped to the back of the tractor, but some companies frown on that. As for the passenger seat, my first two trucks did not have a passenger seat.

Walking does wonders for health. Try to walk 20 minutes a day at least.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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Mountain Driving Without Engine Brake

Generally you want high rpm going uphill (for power in case trailer starts to slide you can pull it), and low rpm downhill (so you have torque to pull forward in case trailer starts to slide). At least that's the way I understand it. Also, I lock the axle's going uphill, unlock going down. It's the way I was taught.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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CB Radio

Thanks ButtonUp. Was in Walmart looking for the Cobra. My WM didn't have it, but they had those. I won't waste the money on that. Thanks again!

Well, I was a little overboard with my comments about getting cooked, but it would take more than legal power to get 30 miles.

I have a Cobra 19 I got cheap and use in the truck. If someone steals it I got a drawer full of replacements at home. That being said, the 29 sounds like a good deal. I highly recommend something that has auto noise level/filter, and a mic gain adjustment.

Posted:  7 years, 10 months ago

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CB Radio

Does a 23channel Cobra walkie talkie w/32 mile range serve the same purpose or is the CB radio still used for general comms by enough truckers (e.g. accident, construction, weather warnings) to justify the added cost and installation?

Thanks!

Ummm...

A 23 channel Cobra CB walkie talkie? I doubt that thing is going to have a 32 mile range, especially if you are transmitting from inside the cab. A CB walkie talkie can work but I would connect it to an external antenna.

Max legal power is 5 watts input, 3 watts out if I remember right. 32 mile range... you're gonna cook yourself with the wattage transmitting AM... at that's if the solar activity allowing that kind of propagation hasn't already killed everyone on Earth, lol.

A good legal CB will get you 5 miles or so in optimal conditions. A few miles is more accurate.

Bottom line, a hand held portable CB will work fine if you hook it to an external antenna, or stick the portable antenna out the window, but I wouldn't recommend that.

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